Confronting Injustice: Moral History and Political Theory

OUP Oxford
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The essays presented in this volume challenge both theorists and citizens to confront grave injustices committed in the United States. David Lyons encourages us to take a fresh look at the beginnings of America, including the colonists' early adoption of race-based slavery even though it was unlawful and why those who rebelled against English oppression were responsible for greater injustices against their Native American neighbors. Confronting injustice requires us to consider how delegates to the 1787 constitutional convention readily embraced increased protections for chattel slavery, why the federal government later abandoned Reconstruction, and why the nation allowed former slave owners to establish a new system of racial oppression called Jim Crow. It requires us to ask why America's official rejection of white supremacy is combined with an unwillingness to address continuing racial stratification. Confronting injustice calls upon political theorists to test their views in the crucible of social history. It challenges those who debate abstractly the idea of an obligation to obey the law to consider the implications of grievous injustices. It calls upon those who assume that their society is now 'reasonably just' to ask when that transformation occurred, despite the fact that children who are black or poor are denied equal opportunity.
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About the author

David Lyons is Professor of Philosophy and Professor of Law at Boston University. He has been awarded numerous fellowships and awards over his career, and is a member of the American Philosophical Association; the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy (and past Vice-President thereof); the American Political Science Association; the American Section of the International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy; and the Association of American law Schools. He serves on several journal editorial boards.
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Additional Information

Publisher
OUP Oxford
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Published on
Jun 13, 2013
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9780191639555
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Americas (North, Central, South, West Indies)
Law / Ethics & Professional Responsibility
Law / Legal History
Philosophy / Ethics & Moral Philosophy
Philosophy / Political
Political Science / History & Theory
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This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Martin Luther King, Jr., may be America’s most revered political figure, commemorated in statues, celebrations, and street names around the world. On the fiftieth anniversary of King’s assassination, the man and his activism are as close to public consciousness as ever. But despite his stature, the significance of King’s writings and political thought remains underappreciated. In To Shape a New World, Tommie Shelby and Brandon Terry write that the marginalization of King’s ideas reflects a romantic, consensus history that renders the civil rights movement inherently conservative—an effort not at radical reform but at “living up to” enduring ideals laid down by the nation’s founders. On this view, King marshaled lofty rhetoric to help redeem the ideas of universal (white) heroes, but produced little original thought. This failure to engage deeply and honestly with King’s writings allows him to be conscripted into political projects he would not endorse, including the pernicious form of “color blindness” that insists, amid glaring race-based injustice, that racism has been overcome. Cornel West, Danielle Allen, Martha Nussbaum, Robert Gooding-Williams, and other authors join Shelby and Terry in careful, critical engagement with King’s understudied writings on labor and welfare rights, voting rights, racism, civil disobedience, nonviolence, economic inequality, poverty, love, just-war theory, virtue ethics, political theology, imperialism, nationalism, reparations, and social justice. In King’s exciting and learned work, the authors find an array of compelling challenges to some of the most pressing political dilemmas of our present, and rethink the legacy of this towering figure.
Oxford Legal Philosophy publishes the best new work in philosophically-oriented legal theory. It commissions and solicits monographs in all branches of the subject, including works on philosophical issues in all areas of public and private law, and in the national, transnational, and international realms; studies of the nature of law, legal institutions, and legal reasoning; treatments of problems in political morality as they bear on law; and explorations in the nature and development of legal philosophy itself. The series represents diverse traditions of thought but always with an emphasis on rigour and originality. It sets the standard in contemporary jurisprudence. This book shows that civil disobedience is generally more defensible than private conscientious objection. Part I explores the morality of conviction and conscience. Each of these concepts informs a distinct argument for civil disobedience. The conviction argument begins with the communicative principle of conscientiousness (CPC). According to the CPC, having a conscientious moral conviction means not just acting consistently with our beliefs and judging ourselves and others by a common moral standard. It also means not seeking to evade the consequences of our beliefs and being willing to communicate them to others. The conviction argument shows that, as a constrained, communicative practice, civil disobedience has a better claim than private objection does to the protections that liberal societies give to conscientious dissent. This view reverses the standard liberal picture which sees private 'conscientious' objection as a modest act of personal belief and civil disobedience as a strategic, undemocratic act whose costs are only sometimes worth bearing. The conscience argument is narrower and shows that genuinely morally responsive civil disobedience honours the best of our moral responsibilities and is protected by a duty-based moral right of conscience. Part II translates the conviction argument and conscience argument into two legal defences. The first is a demands-of-conviction defence. The second is a necessity defence. Both of these defences apply more readily to civil disobedience than to private disobedience. Part II also examines lawful punishment, showing that, even when punishment is justifiable, civil disobedients have a moral right not to be punished.
This is a book about people learning there are three sides to the truth; What you say; What they say; The facts of what happened.

Alan Da'vide is the hero. He is just a guy out to make his corner of the Universe a little better. He is helped by his best friend Mia, who happens to be an AI (Artificial Intelligence). They have shared many adventures in the past. This story is the most recent. In this adventure they discover Earth- full of Humans and Dolphins not at war with each other. How this is possible? Everybody knows Dolphins hate Humans! Alan and Mia also locate an ancient moon base, vacant of inhabitants. Here they meet an ancient AI who shares the history the race of Humans that originally built the moon base. They uncover the real history of the Universe, and discover how the Dolphins have twisted the truth, while trying to kill or enslave all the Humans in the Universe.

The book is woven together with New Age thinking good old common sense,-a road map on how to interact and respect people when living your life everyday. The story also show you a way to love yourself, and change the way you look at the bigger picture of life (In any century).

With the majestic Universe as our background for this adventure Alan and Mia spin you along with them as they travel through time and space-meeting new friends as they uncover the truth of the Universe and the untold truth of the beginnings of the Human civilization on Earth. It's a fun story for all teens and adults. A small book with a big message.

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