Water 4.0: The Past, Present, and Future of the World's Most Vital Resource

Yale University Press
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Turn on the faucet, and water pours out. Pull out the drain plug, and the dirty water disappears. Most of us give little thought to the hidden systems that bring us water and take it away when we’re done with it. But these underappreciated marvels of engineering face an array of challenges that cannot be solved without a fundamental change to our relationship with water, David Sedlak explains in this enlightening book. To make informed decisions about the future, we need to understand the three revolutions in urban water systems that have occurred over the past 2,500 years and the technologies that will remake the system.div /DIVdivThe author starts by describing Water 1.0, the early Roman aqueducts, fountains, and sewers that made dense urban living feasible. He then details the development of drinking water and sewage treatment systems—the second and third revolutions in urban water. He offers an insider’s look at current systems that rely on reservoirs, underground pipe networks, treatment plants, and storm sewers to provide water that is safe to drink, before addressing how these water systems will have to be reinvented. For everyone who cares about reliable, clean, abundant water, this book is essential reading./DIV
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Additional Information

Publisher
Yale University Press
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Published on
Jan 28, 2014
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Pages
349
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ISBN
9780300199352
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Language
English
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Genres
Architecture / Urban & Land Use Planning
Business & Economics / Urban & Regional
Nature / Natural Resources
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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