Post-Traumatic God: How the Church Cares for People Who Have Been to Hell and Back

Church Publishing, Inc.
1
Free sample

After traumatic events, many (especially young people) turn away from the Church; Post-Traumatic God presents a path home, providing a way back to a God who can be trusted, loved, and worshipped. Today, the church is sometimes viewed (even from within) as a place apart, which may create a barrier of understanding for those who have experienced trauma. Post-Traumatic God grew out of Peters’ own experience as a chaplain in Iraq and later as an Episcopal priest, and from his subsequent work with an organization he founded, Episcopal Veterans for Peace, which helped him identify the need for this quite-different book to bridge that gap. In it, Peters explores three related themes: history (the early church itself was a post-traumatic community); theology (especially building on Tillich's World War I experiences and the theology he subsequently developed); and ecclesiology (how church can offer community to trauma survivors. Post-Traumatic God equips the Church to heal the unseen wounds of the soul. War is Hell. For many who go to war, Hell is a place they can come back from. But others find, on their return, that Hell has come back with them. This was true for David Peters. As a chaplain in Iraq, he saw things he couldn’t unsee. He experienced things that would stay with him for the rest of his life. He came home, suffering from the effects of traumatic stress, to a failing marriage, a fractured faith, and an unknown future. Post-Traumatic God tells the story of how he put his life and faith back together—and how we can help others do so as well. The first Christians, he says, were themselves traumatized by Jesus’s crucifixion. The New Testament, he argues, is a post-traumatic book written by a post-traumatic people. Paul Tillich, the great twentieth-century theologian traumatized during World War I, developed new ways of understanding God that helped Peters recover his sense of the sacred—and can help others. In his work with veterans that now defines his vocation as an Episcopal priest, Peters has learned that we don’t need to “help” veterans—we need to listen to them and pray with them as they learn not to expect more trauma around the next corner. “Veterans do not need more barbeques, picnics, or trips to amusement parks,” he writes. “What we do need is community, connection to ourselves, to each other, and to God. The Church is the best organization to do this.”
Read more
5.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Church Publishing, Inc.
Read more
Published on
Sep 1, 2016
Read more
Pages
160
Read more
ISBN
9780819233042
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Religion / Faith
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
If you're not daring to believe God for the impossible, you may be sleeping through some of the best parts of your Christian Life.
 
This book is not a Snuggie. The words on these pages will not go down like Ambien. I’m not writing to calm or coddle you. With God’s help, I intend to incite a riot in your mind. Trip your breakers and turn out the lights in your favorite hiding places of insecurity and fear. Then flip the switch back on so that God’s truth can illuminate the divine destiny that may have been lying dormant inside you for years. In short, I’m out to activate your audacious faith. To inspire you to ask God for the impossible. And in the process, to reconnect you with your God-sized purpose and potential.
—STEVEN FURTICK, from Sun Stand Still

“Steven Furtick challenges all of us—from the missionary in the third world to the family in the suburbs—to believe God for the impossible and begin living a life of faith beyond the ordinary.”
—ANDY STANLEY, senior pastor, North Point Community Church

“I don’t know anyone better positioned to challenge you to rise above mundane living and embrace faith-filled audacity than Steven Furtick.”
—CRAIG GROESCHEL, senior pastor, LifeChurch.tv

“For too long Christians have embraced a miniscule vision of faith.… Steven Furtick reminds us that the God who accomplished the impossible through the great heroes of faith still desires to do the same through us today.”
—JENTEZEN FRANKLIN, senior pastor, Free Chapel

“This book will show you that your hopes and expectations are truly just the beginning of what God can do.” 
—ED YOUNG, senior pastor, Fellowship Church



From the Trade Paperback edition.
What if our beliefs were not what divided us, but what pulled us together In Have a Little Faith, Mitch Albom offers a beautifully written story of a remarkable eight-year journey between two worlds--two men, two faiths, two communities--that will inspire readers everywhere. Albom's first nonfiction book since Tuesdays with Morrie, Have a Little Faith begins with an unusual request: an eighty-two-year-old rabbi from Albom's old hometown asks him to deliver his eulogy. Feeling unworthy, Albom insists on understanding the man better, which throws him back into a world of faith he'd left years ago. Meanwhile, closer to his current home, Albom becomes involved with a Detroit pastor--a reformed drug dealer and convict--who preaches to the poor and homeless in a decaying church with a hole in its roof. Moving between their worlds, Christian and Jewish, African-American and white, impoverished and well-to-do, Albom observes how these very different men employ faith similarly in fighting for survival: the older, suburban rabbi embracing it as death approaches; the younger, inner-city pastor relying on it to keep himself and his church afloat. As America struggles with hard times and people turn more to their beliefs, Albom and the two men of God explore issues that perplex modern man: how to endure when difficult things happen; what heaven is; intermarriage; forgiveness; doubting God; and the importance of faith in trying times. Although the texts, prayers, and histories are different, Albom begins to recognize a striking unity between the two worlds--and indeed, between beliefs everywhere. In the end, as the rabbi nears death and a harsh winter threatens the pastor's wobbly church, Albom sadly fulfills the rabbi's last request and writes the eulogy. And he finally understands what both men had been teaching all along: the profound comfort of believing in something bigger than yourself. Have a Little Faith is a book about a life's purpose; about losing belief and finding it again; about the divine spark inside us all. It is one man's journey, but it is everyone's story. Ten percent of the profits from this book will go to charity, including The Hole In The Roof Foundation, which helps refurbish places of worship that aid the homeless.
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.