Bringing Up Oscar: The Story of the Men and Women Who Founded the Academy

Pegasus Books
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The untold story of the innovative pioneers who helped make movies the preeminent art form of the twentieth century.

The founders of the now infamous Academy were a motley crew as individuals, but when they first converged in Hollywood, then just a small town with dirt roads, sparks flew and fueled a common dream: to bring artistic validity to their beloved new medium.

Who were these movers and shakers who would change movies forever? And what about Oscar, their famous son? He is fast approaching his hundredth birthday and is still the undisputed king of Hollywood. Yet with such dynamic parents, what else could we expect?

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About the author

Debra Ann Pawlak has spent over ten years writing about Hollywood history and is a frequent contributor to The Mediadrome. She is the author of Farmington and Farmington Hills, for Arcadia’s “Making of America” series, and has written a screenplay about Clara Bow. She lives in southeastern Michigan.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Pegasus Books
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Published on
Jan 12, 2012
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Pages
336
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ISBN
9781605982168
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Language
English
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Genres
Performing Arts / Film / History & Criticism
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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