U.S. Army Guerrilla Warfare Handbook

Sold by Simon and Schuster
Free sample

They can be swift, silent, and deadly. That's why armed guerrillas are feared by even the largest, best-equipped fighting forces. No tank, rocket-propelled grenade, or infantry battalion can match the guerrilla team's ability to exact brutality with precision, instill fear in enemy hearts, and viciously deflate morale. From the snows of Korea to the jungles of Southeast Asia to the mountains of Afghanistan, the U.S. Army has employed guerrilla tactics to deadly effect. Those tactics and techniques, being used today by U.S. soldiers, are laid out in the U.S. Army Guerrilla Warfare Handbook.

Employing small, heavily-armed, and well-oiled fire teams, guerrilla warfare has played an invaluable role in the success of nearly every U.S. campaign for decades. Here, its methods are detailed: raids and ambushes, demolition, counterintelligence, mining and sniping, psychological warfare, communications, and much more. This is an inside look at the guerrilla strategies and weapons that have come to be feared by enemies and respected by allies. Not another outside perspective or commentary on unconventional warfare, this is the original—of use to soldiers in the field and to anyone with an interest in military tactics.
Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Jan 27, 2009
Read more
Collapse
Pages
264
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781626366282
Read more
Collapse
Features
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
History / Military / Special Forces
History / Military / Strategy
History / Military / United States
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Dr Heilbrunn has already established himself as a historian of irregular warfare. But the subject is not merely a matter of past history, because the so-called ‘nuclear stalemate’, which has made total warfare improbable, has at the same time made limited warfare the only kind that the world can afford to risk. One hopes, naturally, that the risk will be avoided; but since even a conventional war of the traditional, pre-nuclear kind might easily lead unintentionally up to a total war between great powers and is therefore also likely to be avoided, there remains the residual danger of what may be called ‘sub-conventional’ warfare in marginal areas, which the great powers would be free to support or disown, to fan up or suppress, according to their immediate interpretation of their own interests. Such are the outbreaks which we have seen in recent years in Malaya, Vietnam, Algeria, Cyprus, Cuba, Laos and elsewhere. These are also, if Korea proves, as we hope, to have been the last conventional war between major powers, the kinds of war we must expect to see renewed in the future.

The Resistance during the Second World War was the prelude to this new kind of warfare. It was not, of course, a new invention between 1940 and 1945: one remembers, on the contrary, the Spanish resistance during the Napoleonic Wars, which gave us the word guerrilla to add to our language, and the exploits of Lawrence and others during the Arab Revolt of 1917. But these were side-shows (Lawrence’s own word) in support of a major conventional war, without which they would have achieved practically nothing. Since the Second World War, the corresponding outbreaks of irregular warfare have stood on their own as the major, if not the only, armed conflicts in their particular struggle, not a side-show in support of a major war elsewhere. The Spanish Civil War of 1936-8 is their archetype. Irregular warfare has accordingly become more professional and highly organized. It has had to acquire a sense of strategy, not merely of tactics. Perhaps eventually it will drop the epithet ‘irregular’. Even by 1945 the ‘partisans’ of southern Europe and the Balkans had ceased to so describe themselves, and adopted instead the nomenclature of regular armies.

Those who fought with the partisans of the Second World War will find that already there have been profound changes in the evolution of partisan warfare since 1945. But thanks to Dr Heilbrunn’s keen sense of the continuity of that evolution, they will also recognize their own side-shows as forming an integral part of the history of this fascinating subject. He does us the honour of frequent quotation from our accounts of war-time experience; and it is encouraging to find that the lessons of that experience have been confirmed by later application elsewhere. His book is perhaps the first comprehensive study of the theoretical aspects of partisan warfare, at least in the English language. It is firmly grounded in practice, and likely to serve for a long time as a standard work.
This manual provides detailed explanation of manufacturing munitions from seemingly innocuous locally available materials. As an official army manual, it was primarily intended to increase the potential of Special Forces and guerrilla troops, however, "Improvised Munitions Handbook" represents perfect reading for all arms enthusiasts, as well as civilians considering their safety. This edition offers simple instructions, enriched with a large number of illustrations, on various techniques for constructing many different weapons and devices made of materials that can be bought in a drug or hardware store or found in a junkyard. The instructions are presented in a way that even people normally not familiar with making and handling munitions can use them. Table of Contents: Explosives and Propellants Plastic Explosive Filler Improvised Black Powder Carbone Tet- Explosive Methyl Nitrate Dynamite Urea Nitrate Explosive Sodium Chlorate and Sugar or Aluminum Explosive… Mines and Grenades Nail Grenade Wine Bottle Cone Charge Coke Bottle Shaped Charge… Small Arms Weapons and Ammunitions Pipe Pistol for 9 mm Ammunition Shotgun (12 gauge) Carbine (7.62 mm Standard Rifle Ammunition) Rifle Cartridge… Mortars and Rockets Shotgun Grenade Launcher Fire Bottle Launcher 60 mm Mortar Projectile Launcher… Incendiary Devices Chemical Fire Bottle Gelled Flame Fuels Improvised White Flare Improvised White Smoke Munitions… Fuses, Detonators & Delay Mechanisms Electric Bulb Initiator Fuse Igniter from Book Matches Delay Igniter from Cigarette Watch Delay Timer Can-Liquid Time Delay Detonator… Miscellaneous Mousetrap Switch Knife Switch Rope Grenade Launching Technique Bicycle Generator Power Source Improvised Battery Armor Materials… Primary High Explosives Secondary High Explosives
When the U.S. military invaded Iraq, it lacked a common understanding of the problems inherent in counterinsurgency campaigns. It had neither studied them, nor developed doctrine and tactics to deal with them. It is fair to say that in 2003, most Army officers knew more about the U.S. Civil War than they did about counterinsurgency.

The U.S. Army / Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual was written to fill that void. The result of unprecedented collaboration among top U.S. military experts, scholars, and practitioners in the field, the manual espouses an approach to combat that emphasizes constant adaptation and learning, the importance of decentralized decision-making, the need to understand local politics and customs, and the key role of intelligence in winning the support of the population. The manual also emphasizes the paradoxical and often counterintuitive nature of counterinsurgency operations: sometimes the more you protect your forces, the less secure you are; sometimes the more force you use, the less effective it is; sometimes doing nothing is the best reaction.

An new introduction by Sarah Sewall, director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, places the manual in critical and historical perspective, explaining the significance and potential impact of this revolutionary challenge to conventional U.S. military doctrine.

An attempt by our military to redefine itself in the aftermath of 9/11 and the new world of international terrorism, The U.S. Army / Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual will play a vital role in American military campaigns for years to come.

The University of Chicago Press will donate a portion of the proceeds from this book to the Fisher House Foundation, a private-public partnership that supports the families of America’s injured servicemen. To learn more about the Fisher House Foundation, visit www.fisherhouse.org.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.