Hardball Retrospective: Evaluating Scouting and Development Outcomes for the Modern-Era Franchises

Tuatara Software, LLC
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 Would your favorite baseball team make the playoffs if player X had not been traded? Imagine your team’s roster from any particular year. Remove all of the players that your team acquired through trades and free agency. Would you be able to field a competitive team? All right, let us re-populate the roster with every player that the organization originally drafted and signed. Yes, we will include undrafted free agents and foreign players who signed with their first Major League team, as well. How does the team stack up now? Is the club better or worse than the squad that you imagined at first?

In Hardball Retrospective, I placed every ballplayer in the modern era (from 1901-present)  on their original teams. Using a variety of advanced statistics and methods, I generated revised standings for each season based entirely on the performance of each team’s “original” players. I discuss every team’s “original” players and seasons at length along with organizational performance with respect to the Amateur Draft (or First-Year Player Draft), amateur free agent signings and other methods of player acquisition.  Season standings, WAR and Win Shares totals for the “original” teams are compared against the real-time or “actual” team results to assess each franchise’s scouting, development and general management skills. 

Edited by Marianne Landrum. Foreword by Don Daglow.

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Tuatara Software, LLC
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Published on
Jan 30, 2015
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Sports & Recreation / Baseball / Essays & Writings
Sports & Recreation / Baseball / General
Sports & Recreation / Baseball / History
Sports & Recreation / Baseball / Statistics
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