Mexican-Origin Foods, Foodways, and Social Movements: Decolonial Perspectives

University of Arkansas Press
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Winner, 2018 ASFS (Association for the Study of Food and Society) Book Award, Edited Volume

This collection of new essays offers groundbreaking perspectives on the ways that food and foodways serve as an element of decolonization in Mexican-origin communities.

The writers here take us from multigenerational acequia farmers, who trace their ancestry to Indigenous families in place well before the Oñate Entrada of 1598, to tomorrow’s transborder travelers who will be negotiating entry into the United States. Throughout, we witness the shifting mosaic of Mexican-origin foods and foodways in the fields, gardens, and kitchen tables from Chiapas to Alaska.

Global food systems are also considered from a critical agroecological perspective, including the ways colonialism affects native biocultural diversity, ecosystem resilience, and equality across species, human groups, and generations.

Mexican-Origin Foods, Foodways, and Social Movements is a major contribution to the understanding of the ways that Mexican-origin peoples have resisted and transformed food systems. It will animate scholarship on global food studies for years to come.
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About the author

Devon G. Peña is a professor of American ethnic studies and anthropology at the University of Washington.

Luz Calvo is a professor of ethnic studies at California State East Bay.

Pancho McFarland is an associate professor of sociology at Chicago State University.

Gabriel R. Valle is an assistant professor of environmental studies at California State University, San Marcos.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Arkansas Press
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Published on
Sep 1, 2017
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Pages
503
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ISBN
9781610756181
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / Agriculture & Food Policy
Social Science / Agriculture & Food
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Social Science / Emigration & Immigration
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Hispanic American Studies
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies
Social Science / General
Social Science / Indigenous Studies
Social Science / Minority Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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