Marines In Combat: 20 True Heroic Tales of U.S. Marines at War, Volume 1: 1918-1945

Pacifica Military History
1
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Marines in Combat

 20 True Heroic Tales of U.S. Marines at War

Volume 1

1918-1945

 by Dick Camp

In twenty hard-hitting, action-packed true, heroic stories—from Marines attacking at Belleau Wood in World War I to patrolling the Dominican Republic between the world wars, and from sea-going Marines under attack at Pearl Harbor to Marine airmen in the attack at Midway, then on to Marine Raiders battling the Japanese at Guadalcanal in 1942 to Marines storming Peleliu in 1944—retired USMC Colonel Dick Camp chronicles the making of the modern U.S. Marine Corps in this first volume of magazine article reprints and excerpts from his growing list of authoritative Marine Corps history books.

Marines in Combat will prove to be inspiring to Marines, former Marines, friends of the U.S. Marine Corps, and any other reader of military history who wants to know what war looks like from the bottom up.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Pacifica Military History
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Published on
Nov 17, 2015
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Pages
375
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ISBN
9781890988876
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / United States
History / Military / World War I
History / Military / World War II
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Kate Moore
A New York Times, USA Today, and Wall Street Journal Bestseller!

"the glowing ghosts of the radium girls haunt us still."—NPR Books

The incredible true story of the women who fought America's Undark danger

The Curies' newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War.

Meanwhile, hundreds of girls toil amidst the glowing dust of the radium-dial factories. The glittering chemical covers their bodies from head to toe; they light up the night like industrious fireflies. With such a coveted job, these "shining girls" are the luckiest alive — until they begin to fall mysteriously ill.

But the factories that once offered golden opportunities are now ignoring all claims of the gruesome side effects, and the women's cries of corruption. And as the fatal poison of the radium takes hold, the brave shining girls find themselves embroiled in one of the biggest scandals of America's early 20th century, and in a groundbreaking battle for workers' rights that will echo for centuries to come.

Written with a sparkling voice and breakneck pace, The Radium Girls fully illuminates the inspiring young women exposed to the "wonder" substance of radium, and their awe-inspiring strength in the face of almost impossible circumstances. Their courage and tenacity led to life-changing regulations, research into nuclear bombing, and ultimately saved hundreds of thousands of lives...

Dick Camp
One of the bloodiest battles in Marine Corps history, Operation Stalemate, as Peleliu was called, was overshadowed by the Normandy landings.  It was also, in time, judged by most historians to have been unnecessary; though it had been conceived to protect MacArthur’s flank in the Philippines, the U.S. fleet’s carrier raids had eliminated Japanese airpower, rendering Peleliu irrelevant.  Nevertheless, the horrifying number of casualties sustained there (71% in one battalion) foreshadowed for the rest of the war:  rather than fight to the death on the beach, the Japanese would now defend in depth and bleed the Americans white.

 

Drawing extensively on personal interviews, the Marine Corps History Division’s vast oral history and photographic collection, and many never-before-published sources, this book gives us a new and harrowing vision of what really happened at Peleliu--and what it meant.  Working closely with two of the 1st Regiment’s battalion commanders--Ray Davis and Russ Honsowetz--Marine Corps veteran and military historian Dick Camp recreates the battle as it was experienced by the men and their officers.  Soldiers who survived the terrible slaughter recall the brutality of combat against an implacable foe; they describe the legendary “Chesty” Puller, leading his decimated regiment against enemy fortifications; they tell of Davis, wounded but refusing evacuation while his men were under fire; and of a division commander who rejects Army reinforcements.  Most of all, their richly detailed, deeply moving story is one of desperate combat in the face of almost certain failure, of valor among comrades joined against impossible odds.

Barbara W. Tuchman
Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best nonfiction books of all time

The Proud Tower, the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Guns of August, and The Zimmerman Telegram comprise Barbara W. Tuchman’s classic histories of the First World War era

In this landmark, Pulitzer Prize–winning account, renowned historian Barbara W. Tuchman re-creates the first month of World War I: thirty days in the summer of 1914 that determined the course of the conflict, the century, and ultimately our present world. Beginning with the funeral of Edward VII, Tuchman traces each step that led to the inevitable clash. And inevitable it was, with all sides plotting their war for a generation. Dizzyingly comprehensive and spectacularly portrayed with her famous talent for evoking the characters of the war’s key players, Tuchman’s magnum opus is a classic for the ages.
 
Praise for The Guns of August
 
“A brilliant piece of military history which proves up to the hilt the force of Winston Churchill’s statement that the first month of World War I was ‘a drama never surpassed.’”—Newsweek
 
“More dramatic than fiction . . . a magnificent narrative—beautifully organized, elegantly phrased, skillfully paced and sustained.”—Chicago Tribune
 
“A fine demonstration that with sufficient art rather specialized history can be raised to the level of literature.”—The New York Times
 
“[The Guns of August] has a vitality that transcends its narrative virtues, which are considerable, and its feel for characterizations, which is excellent.”—The Wall Street Journal


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Dick Camp

ECHO AMONG WARRIORS

A Novel of Marines In the Vietnam War

 by Dick Camp

Echo Among Warriors is a fictional account of gut-level combat as seen through the eyes of American and North Vietnamese participants. The setting is the dense jungle of the Khe Sanh plateau, where the author experienced the brutality of war as a Marine company commander during the North Vietnamese Army’s (NVA) build-up to the 1968 Tet offensive. His company regularly patrolled the grass-covered ridgelines and jungle-canopied valleys surrounding the Khe Sanh Combat Base (KSCB), the western anchor of a series of strongpoints that stretched across northern South Vietnam. The objective of these installations was to close the infiltration routes, but the effort resulted in ceding freedom of movement to the NVA while fixing American troops in position. Khe Sanh was a prime example. It was located on a major infiltration route that ran from the Laotian border east to the Ba Long and Ashau valleys and south to the population-rich coastal lowlands of South Vietnam.

The hills and valleys surrounding KSCB became a vicious, no-holds-barred slug fest, costing hundreds of lives on either side. In the spring of 1967 there were a series of engagements in what became known as the Hill Fights, which were focused on the four major heights northwest of KCSB—Hill 950, Hill 881 North, Hill 881 South, and Hill 861. By the fall of the year, Marines were reporting an increasing concentration of NVA troops and military equipment around the base. Intelligence reports placed the NVA 325C and 304 divisions, a total of approximately twenty thousand men, in the area. Opposing them were three infantry battalions of the 26th Marine Regiment, a battalion of the 9th Marine Regiment, and an Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) Ranger battalion totaling some six thousand men. By the time of this story, September 1967, KSCB had become a tempting target for destruction.

Echo Among Warriors is a story of close combat in a life-and-death struggle between two opposing, equally committed adversaries. It represents just one of perhaps thousands of deadly encounters that reflect the reality of battle—a mind-numbing, intensely personal experience that forever changes the participant. This powerful narrative makes it possible for the reader to experience both sides of the battle. The same battle sequence will roll forward like a movie scene and then be replayed from the opposite viewpoint—through the eyes of the Marines and sequentially through the eyes of the North Vietnamese. The bullet fired from a Marine’s M-16 at a silhouetted enemy solider crouched on the jungle path will in the next chapter tear into the flesh of that crouched NVA trooper. The story unfolds from the initial contact to the final horrific ending. In war, every action has a beginning and an end.

There has been no intention to portray gratuitous violence or profanity. War veterans know that words are insufficient to describe the destructive power of weaponry and the resulting, horrific wounds, the pain of a lost comrade, and the sudden realization that it could have been him. War causes a visceral, emotional impact on those who fight it. Profanity is like combat humor—both an integral part of the real and fictional combat picture. Veterans will already be familiar with war terminology—“Arty, Arty, Arty,” “Shot”, “Corpsman”—the greenhorn can refer to the glossary. Nor has there been any intention to depict any similarity between the characters and any veteran of the war. Each character is a composite from the author’s sometimes fallible memory. They are rather like a kaleidoscope reflecting a million pieces of colored glass—no one in particular, yet everyone together.

Combat is not for the faint of heart . . . and neither is this book!

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