Memories of Post-Imperial Nations: The Aftermath of Decolonization, 1945–2013

Cambridge University Press
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Memories of Post-Imperial Nations presents the first transnational comparison of Great Britain, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Portugal, Italy and Japan, all of whom lost or 'decolonized' their overseas empires after 1945. Since the empires of the world crumbled, the post-imperial nations have been struggling to come to terms with the present, and as recall sets in 'wars of memory' have arisen, leading to a process of collective 'editing'. As these nations rebuild themselves they shed old characteristics and acquire new ones, looking at new orientations. This book brings together varying perspectives with historians and political scientists of these nations attempting to bind memory and its experience of different post-imperial nations.
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About the author

Dietmar Rothermund is Emeritus Professor at Heidelberg University, Germany. He taught and conducted research at the South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University, from 1968 until his retirement in 2001. He received the state decoration, the Officer's Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany, in 2011. His books include India: The Rise of an Asian Giant; An Economic History of India; The Routledge Companion to Decolonization; The Global Impact of the Great Depression: 1929–1939; and Contemporary India: Political, Economic and Social Development since 1947.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
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Published on
May 14, 2015
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Pages
220
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ISBN
9781316569825
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Modern / 20th Century
History / World
Political Science / Comparative Politics
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This content is DRM protected.
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