Challenging Humanism: Essays in Honor of Dominic Baker-Smith

University of Delaware Press
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Dominic Baker-Smith has been a leading international authority on humanism for more than four decades, specializing in the works of Erasmus and Thomas More. The present collection of essays by colleagues throughout Europe, Canada, and the United States examines humanism in both its historic sixteenth-century meanings and applications and the humanist tradition in our own time, drawing on his work and that of scholars who have followed him. Contributors include Andrew Weiner, Elizabeth McCutcheon, and Germaine Warkentin. Arthur F. Kinney is Thomas W. Copeland Professor of Literary History at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Ton Hoenselaars is Associate Professor of English at the University of Utrecht.
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About the author

Dominic Baker-Smith is a professor emeritus of English Literature at the University of Amsterdam.

Arthur F. Kinney is Copeland Professor of Literary History at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and Director of the Massachusetts Center for Renaissance Studies. He is the editor of "Renaissance Drama: An Anthology of Plays and Entertainments" (Blackwell, 1999"), A Companion to Renaissance Drama" (Blackwell, 2002) and of the journal "English Literary Renaissance." His other works include "Elizabethan Backgrounds" (Second Edition, 1994), "Rogues, Vagabonds and Sturdy Beggars" (Second Edition, 1995), "Humanist Poetics" (1986), and "Lies Like Truth: Shakespeare, Macbeth, and the Cultural Moment" (2001).

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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Delaware Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2005
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Pages
335
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ISBN
9780874139204
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Criticism / European / English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Literary Criticism / European / General
Philosophy / Movements / Humanism
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This content is DRM protected.
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