Black Domers: African-American Students at Notre Dame in Their Own Words

University of Notre Dame Pess
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Black Domers tells the compelling story of racial integration at the University of Notre Dame in the post–World War II era. In a series of seventy-five essays, beginning with the first African-American to graduate from Notre Dame in 1947 to a member of the class of 2017 who also served as student body president, we can trace the trials, tribulations, and triumphs of the African-American experience at Notre Dame through seven decades.

Don Wycliff and David Krashna’s book is a revised edition of a 2014 publication. With a few exceptions, the stories of these graduates are told in their own words, in the form of essays on their experiences at Notre Dame. The range of these experiences is broad; joys and opportunities, but also hardships and obstacles, are recounted. Notable among several themes emerging from these essays is the importance of leadership from the top in successfully bringing African-Americans into the student body and enabling them to become fully accepted, fully contributing members of the Notre Dame community. The late Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, president of the university from 1952 to 1987, played an indispensable role in this regard and also wrote the foreword to the book.

This book will be an invaluable resource for Notre Dame graduates, especially those belonging to African-American and other minority groups, specialists in race and diversity in higher education, civil rights historians, and specialists in race relations.

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About the author

Don Wycliff, Notre Dame Class of 1969, is the former public editor of the Chicago Tribune.

David Krashna, Notre Dame Class of 1971, is a judge of the Alameda County, California, Superior Court.

Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C. (1917—2015) was president of the University of Notre Dame for 35 years (1952 until 1987).

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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Notre Dame Pess
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Published on
Aug 15, 2017
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Pages
410
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ISBN
9780268102524
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / History
History / African American
History / United States / State & Local / Midwest (IA, IL, IN, KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD, WI)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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