Broadview Heights

Arcadia Publishing
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Located in southern Cuyahoga County at the crossroads of the Ohio Turnpike and Interstate 77 are the rolling hills and forested landscapes of Broadview Heights. "Highest of the Heights" is the phrase coined by disc jockey Ed Fisher when radio station WGAR's broadcast studio was located in Broadview Heights. Many radio personalities either lived here or in neighboring communities, and events in Broadview Heights were often mentioned on the radio. Part of the Cleveland Metro Parks surrounds the southern edge of town, including the highest point in Cuyahoga County. Among those who call Broadview Heights home are Radio Hall of Fame disc jockey Candy Lee, artist Shirley Aley Campbell, figure skater Tonia Kwiatkowski, and Cultural Olympiad gold medal-winning ice sculptor Aaron Costic of Elegant Ice Creations.
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About the author

Donald Faulhaber Jr. has worked as a licensed funeral director and embalmer for over 50 years, operating the family funeral home founded by his parents, Donald and Lenore, in 1951. He is active in civic and service organizations and serves as a trustee of the Broadview Heights Historical Society. The Faulhaber family traces their ancestry to founding members of both Brecksville and North Royalton Townships. Images included in this book were compiled from the archives of the Broadview Heights Historical Society in addition to private collections.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Arcadia Publishing
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Published on
Jul 4, 2016
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Pages
128
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ISBN
9781439656662
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / State & Local / Midwest (IA, IL, IN, KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD, WI)
Photography / Subjects & Themes / Historical
Photography / Subjects & Themes / Regional
Travel / Pictorials
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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