The Radical Center: Middle Americans and the Politics of Alienation

University of Notre Dame Pess
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Drawing on extensive research and national survey data, sociologist Donald I. Warren here presents an in-depth analysis of the Middle American Radicals, who they are, what they believe, the major targets of their grievances, and the likelihood of their political mobilization. The evidence indicates that as many as one in five Americans shares the Radical Center perspective, including people who outwardly seem to have very little in common by way of economic, occupational, or education status. Of particular significance are the findings concerning potential support for the various presidential candidates and for a third national political party.
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About the author

Donald I. Warren (1935-1997) was program director at the Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations at the University of Michigan and was an associate professor of sociology and past chairman of the Oakland University's department of sociology and anthropology. He is the author of Black Neighborhoods: An Assessment of Community Power (1975), and Radio Priest: Charles Coughlin, the Father of Hate Radio (1996).

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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Notre Dame Pess
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Published on
Jan 1, 1976
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Pages
284
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ISBN
9780268193089
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / Cultural Policy
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Social Science / Poverty & Homelessness
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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J. D. Vance
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From the Hardcover edition.
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From the Trade Paperback edition.
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