Frank Lloyd Wright: A Bio-bibliography

Greenwood Publishing Group
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Frank Lloyd Wright is one of the 20th century's best-known architects. Over 40 years after his death, historical and critical comment and debate are increasing and controversy continues to surround him. This volume is a chronologically arranged, annotated bibliography of English- and foreign-language sources including over 3,500 primary entries, with thousands more connected references, presented alphabetically by decades and genres.

The book documents not only the literature on Wright from 1886 to the present, but also his own extensive writings. It covers source books, monographs, anthologies, exhibition catalogues, book and exhibition reviews, periodical articles, and obituaries. All references are indexed by personal names, buildings, and projects. There is also a photo-essay comprised entirely of images published here for the first time, and a comprehensive chronology of the architect's life and career, which spanned 70 years and produced about 450 buildings and almost 550 unrealized architectural projects. The book will be of great value to scholars, students, and practitioners.

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About the author

DONALD LANGMEAD is Adjunct Professor in the School of Architecture and Design at the University of South Australia.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Greenwood Publishing Group
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Published on
Dec 31, 2003
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Pages
430
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ISBN
9780313319938
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Language
English
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Genres
Architecture / General
Art / General
Biography & Autobiography / Artists, Architects, Photographers
Reference / Bibliographies & Indexes
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The team behind the New York Times bestseller The Book of General Ignorance turns conventional biography on its head—and shakes out the good stuff.
 
Following their Herculean—or is it Sisyphean?—efforts to save the living from ignorance, the two wittiest Johns in the English language turn their attention to the dead.
 
As the authors themselves say, “The first thing that strikes you about the Dead is just how many of them there are.” Helpfully, Lloyd and Mitchinson have employed a simple—but ruthless—criterion for inclusion: the dead person has to be interesting.
 
Here, then, is a dictionary of the dead, an encyclopedia of the embalmed. Ludicrous in scope, whimsical in its arrangement, this wildly entertaining tome presents pithy and provocative biographies of the no-longer-living from the famous to the undeservedly and—until now—permanently obscure. Spades in hand, Lloyd and Mitchinson have dug up everything embarrassing, fascinating, and downright weird about their subjects’ lives and added their own uniquely irreverent observations.
 
Organized by capricious categories—such as dead people who died virgins, who kept pet monkeys, who lost limbs, whose corpses refused to stay put—the dearly departed, from the inventor of the stove to a cross-dressing, bear-baiting female gangster finally receive the epitaphs they truly deserve.
 
Discover:

* Why Freud had a lifelong fear of trains
* The one thing that really made Isaac Newton laugh
* How Catherine the Great really died (no horse was involved)
 
Much like the country doctor who cured smallpox (he’s in here), Lloyd and Mitchinson have the perfect antidote for anyone out there dying of boredom. The Book of the Dead—like life itself—is hilarious, tragic, bizarre, and amazing. You may never pass a graveyard again without chuckling.


From the Hardcover edition.
Apuleius' Metamorphoses or The Golden Ass, our only complete Latin novel, tells the story of Lucius, a young man turned into a donkey by magic because of his unfettered curiosity. After many adventures he is finally saved by the goddess Isis, whose follower he becomes. The famous first book of the novel introduces the protagonist's character, his interest in magic and his gullibility, but also important themes of the novel such as metamorphosis from man into beast. Lucius listens to stories about magic and witchcraft told to him on his journey to ancient Thessaly and narrates them to the reader. A substantial part of the first book accordingly concentrates on the self-contained tale about a certain Socrates and his unhappy experiences with murderous Thessalian witches. Apuleius himself had been put on trial for allegedly using erotic magic to make his future wife fall in love with him, a theme which also appears in Metamorphoses 1. Throughout the novel, Apuleius portrays Lucius as an unreliable first person narrator and thus implicates the reader of the novel in the same character fault that drives its protagonist: curiosity.This new edition presents the Latin text with a modern translation, substantial introduction and accompanying commentary. The author Apuleius is discussed in the literary environment of the second century AD together with key themes of the first book and the novel as a whole. Special attention is given to ancient magic, the roles of philosophy and the goddess Isis in the novel as well as the extensive reception of the first book in literature up to modern times. The commentary illustrates Apuleius' text as a densely constructed literary work and explains literary allusions as well as philosophical, historical and religious contexts.Regine May is Lecturer in Latin Literature in the Department of Classics at the University of Leeds and the author of Apuleius and Drama: The Ass on Stage (Oxford 2006) and numerous articles on Apuleius and the ancient novels.
Soon after 1900 in both North America and Europe the evolution from the tradition of Mediterranean and Gallic architectural styles to modernism began. This phenomenon was due, in part, to American industrial architecture and the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. Wright's building and architectural treatises of 1898-1908, with the additional help of Dutch propaganda on his behalf, significantly influenced European practitioners and theorists. European architecture within and outside of Holland reflects an adaptation of Wright's theories along with the structural determinism of American industrial buildings. With new evidence and fresh analysis culled from Dutch and American archives, personal correspondence, and professional material, this study examines the weight of Wright's works and words and those of the Dutchmen H.P. Berlage, Theo van Doesburg, Jan Wils, J.J.P. Oud, William Dudok, and Hendrik Theodor Wijdeveld.

This new insight on the effects of Wright's architectural theories and designs, coupled with an extensive guide for further research, will attract art and architecture scholars and historians on both sides of the Atlantic and will also be of interest to social historians, artists, and architects. Events and new theories, including the assertion that Hendrik Theodor Wijdeveld was the catalytic source behind Wright's Taliesin Fellowship established in 1932, are presented in clear accessible language. Tied to the text are numerous visual presentations of significant designs and buildings.

Apuleius' Metamorphoses or The Golden Ass, our only complete Latin novel, tells the story of Lucius, a young man turned into a donkey by magic because of his unfettered curiosity. After many adventures he is finally saved by the goddess Isis, whose follower he becomes. The famous first book of the novel introduces the protagonist's character, his interest in magic and his gullibility, but also important themes of the novel such as metamorphosis from man into beast. Lucius listens to stories about magic and witchcraft told to him on his journey to ancient Thessaly and narrates them to the reader. A substantial part of the first book accordingly concentrates on the self-contained tale about a certain Socrates and his unhappy experiences with murderous Thessalian witches. Apuleius himself had been put on trial for allegedly using erotic magic to make his future wife fall in love with him, a theme which also appears in Metamorphoses 1. Throughout the novel, Apuleius portrays Lucius as an unreliable first person narrator and thus implicates the reader of the novel in the same character fault that drives its protagonist: curiosity.This new edition presents the Latin text with a modern translation, substantial introduction and accompanying commentary. The author Apuleius is discussed in the literary environment of the second century AD together with key themes of the first book and the novel as a whole. Special attention is given to ancient magic, the roles of philosophy and the goddess Isis in the novel as well as the extensive reception of the first book in literature up to modern times. The commentary illustrates Apuleius' text as a densely constructed literary work and explains literary allusions as well as philosophical, historical and religious contexts.Regine May is Lecturer in Latin Literature in the Department of Classics at the University of Leeds and the author of Apuleius and Drama: The Ass on Stage (Oxford 2006) and numerous articles on Apuleius and the ancient novels.
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