Biko - Cry Freedom: The True Story of the Young South African Martyr and his Struggle to Raise Black Consciousness

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Subjected to 22 hours of interrogation, torture and beating by South African police on September 6, 1977, Steve Biko died six days later. Donald Woods, Biko's close friend and a leading white South African newspaper editor, exposed the murder helping to ignite the black revolution.
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About the author

Donald Woods was a South-African born journalist who founded and edited The Daily Dispatch, which he used as a vehicle to attack South Africa's apartheid establishment. He was exiled to London where he remained until his death from cancer in 2001.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Holt Paperbacks
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Published on
Apr 1, 2011
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Pages
289
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ISBN
9781429936385
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional / African American & Black
Biography & Autobiography / Political
Biography & Autobiography / Social Activists
History / Africa / South / Republic of South Africa
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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In Inside Apartheid, South African-born Janet Levine recounts the horrors and struggles she faced against the minority white government’s brutal system of repression from a rare perspective—that of a white woman who worked within the system even as she fought to transform it.
 
With candor and courage, Levine skillfully interweaves her personal story of a privileged white citizen’s growing awareness of the evils of apartheid with a moving account of the increasing violence in and radical polarization of South Africa.
 
Inside Apartheid brings to life both the unsurpassed physical beauty and the institutionalized brutality of the country Levine loves so deeply. We accompany her on a daring trip to the devastated black township of Soweto immediately following the unrest in 1976. There she visits the home of a “colored” family with no way out of apartheid induced poverty. On a journey through the “black” homelands where Levine discovers firsthand the horrifying evidence of the long-term genocide of three million people.
 
As a student activist, as a journalist, and as an elected member of the Johannesburg City Council, Levine openly attacked the government’s policies in hundreds of speeches and articles, led election campaigns for one of her mentors, member of Parliament Helen Suzman, and was associated with Steve Biko and other less internationally famous but equally important South African figures. Levine was a founding member of the first black taxi co-operative in South Africa, and instrumental in having hundreds of illegally fired black workers reinstated with back pay after the Johannesburg strikes of 1980.
 
We feel Levine’s pain when she finally asks soul-searching questions about the effectiveness of being a white activist. Inside Apartheid, with such honest witness-bearing, may be her most important act of all.
A gripping tale of personal revolution by a man who went from Crips co-founder to Nobel Peace Prize nominee, author, and antigang activist

When his L.A. neighborhood was threatened by gangbangers, Stanley Tookie Williams and a friend formed the Crips, but what began as protection became worse than the original gangs. From deadly street fights with their rivals to drive-by shootings and stealing cars, the Crips' influence -- and Tookie's reputation -- began to spread across L.A. Soon he was regularly under police surveillance, and, as a result, was arrested often, though always released because the charges did not stick. But in 1981, Tookie was convicted of murdering four people and was sent to death row at San Quentin in Marin County, California.

Tookie maintained his innocence and began to work in earnest to prevent others from following his path. Whether he was creating nationwide peace protocols, discouraging adolescents from joining gangs, or writing books, Tookie worked tirelessly for the rest of his life to end gang violence. Even after his death, his legacy continues, supported by such individuals as Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Snoop Dogg, Jesse Jackson, and many more.

This posthumous edition of Blue Rage, Black Redemption features a foreword by Tavis Smiley and an epilogue by Barbara Becnel, which details not only the influence of Tookie's activism but also her eyewitness account of his December 2005 execution, and the inquest that followed.

By turns frightening and enlightening, Blue Rage, Black Redemption is a testament to the strength of the human spirit and an invaluable lesson in how rage can be turned into redemption.
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