Turkish Monuments in Damascus

Abdullah Manaz
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 Almost all of Turkish Monuments in Damascus which is capital of Syria are in this E-Book. Building information of these monuments has taken from their inscriptions when I was in Damascus in 1988. Many inscriptions of monuments in Damascus are lost today. The places of Turkish monuments are shown on the map that I prepared specially as Flash format which you enlarge it. You can easily find place of all monuments from this map, you can see its photographs at this E-Book and you can easily learn when they were built and who built them.
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About the author

Abdullah Manaz was born in 1958. He graduated from Ankara University Faculty of Theology Ankara in 1984. He became a doctor of Islamic Philosophy in Ankara University Graduate School of Social Sciences in 06.11.1990. His Doctorate Thesis was about the Role of Wisdom about Understanding of the Holy Quran.

He started journalism after 1978 and some of his news and cartoons were published in national newspapers. He started working at Turkish Radio and Television as producer in 1984. He has produced and directed hundreds of TV programs until this day. He received various awards in 1985, 1986 and 1994 for his programs. In 1987, he studied Arabic language for a period of one year in Syria. He appointed as an expert in 15.06.1990. He made researches several times in Northern Iraq, Iran, Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Libya, and Tunisia and in European countries.

He gave lectures about “Program Production on TV” at Faculty of Communication of Ege University between 1995 and 1998. He was president of "National unity and Strategy Foundation" in 2003 and 2004. He has participated in national and international conferences and has presented papers. He has retired as a strategic expert from Turkish Radio and Television Corporation in 2011. He speaks English and Arabic. He has written 17 books in Turkish, English and Arabic.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abdullah Manaz
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Published on
Aug 30, 2014
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Pages
441
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / Middle Eastern
History / Middle East / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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On March 17, 2011, many Syrians rose up against the authoritarian Asad regime that had ruled them with an iron fist for forty years. Initial successes were quickly quashed, and the revolution seemed to devolve into a civil war pitting the government against its citizens and extremist mercenaries. As of late 2015, almost 300,000 Syrians have been killed and over half of a total population of 23 million forced out of their homes. Nine million are internally displaced and over four million are wandering the world, many on foot or in leaky boats. Countless numbers have been disappeared. These shocking statistics and the unstoppable violence notwithstanding, the revolution goes on.

The story of the attempted crushing of the revolution is known. Less well covered has been the role of artists and intellectuals in representing to the world and to their people the resilience of revolutionary resistance and defiance. How is it possible that artists, filmmakers and writers have not been cowed into numbed silence but are becoming more and more creative? How can we make sense of their insistence that despite the apocalypse engulfing the country their revolution is ongoing and that their works participate in its persistence? With smartphones, pens, voices and brushes, these artists registered their determination to keep the idea of the revolution alive. Dancing in Damascus traces the first four years of the Syrian revolution and the activists’ creative responses to physical and emotional violence.

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