The Morning Mind: Use Your Brain to Master Your Day and Supercharge Your Life

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Unleash positive thinking and productive imagination, and flip negative thoughts and behaviors into a lifetime to improve every aspect of your life—each morning, one day at a time.

Bad habits. Bad feelings. Bad mornings that turn into regrettable days.

Banish them all with simple brain hacks that flip negative thoughts and behaviors into positive, productive ones. Instead of dragging through your day, learn to wake up refreshed, recharge regularly, and live better than ever.

The Morning Mind makes it easy. Based on findings from neuroscience and medicine, the book helps you tamp down on the fear-driven reptile brain and tap into the part linked to thinking and imagination.

With topics ranging from diet and hydration to exercise and meditation, you’ll find ideas for activating your brain—and improving every aspect of your life:

  • Restore healthy cycles of waking and sleeping
  • Block harmful cortisol hormones
  • Boost mental performance
  • Create calmer mornings
  • Develop self-discipline
  • Stimulate creativity
  • Improve your leadership skills
  • And more.

From the moment the alarm clock rings, The Morning Mind helps you greet each day with gusto.

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About the author

Dr. Rob Carter III, FACSM, FAIS, a US Army Officer, is an expert in human performance and has adjunct appointments at various academic institutions. As a Military Social Aide, Dr. Carter completed military assignments in several domestic and international locations. He has a PhD in biomedical sciences and medical physiology and an MPH in chronic disease epidemiology. Some of his accolades include being selected as a Yerby Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and as an inaugural Gates Millennium Scholar.

Kirti Salwe Carter, MBBS, MPH has trained in meditation and breathing techniques, and leads popular wellness seminars. Both authors live in San Antonio, TX.

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Additional Information

Publisher
AMACOM
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Published on
Jan 8, 2019
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Pages
223
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ISBN
9780814439869
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Language
English
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Genres
Psychology / Emotions
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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At the start of every school day, it’s not an unfamiliar sight to see younger children bounding toward school, bright-eyed and bushy-tailed, ready to seize the day. In contrast, adolescents sometimes seem to sleepwalk toward their middle and high schools, often bleary-eyed, cantankerous, and less than enthusiastic to get down to work. Why the difference?

Recent developmental research has demonstrated a relationship between sleep/wake patterns and different kinds of problem behaviors, including social adjustment problems, family coercion, and disaffection from school. Adolescents who prefer staying up later in the evening and arising late in the morning (i.e., eveningness) have often been considered at greater risk of suffering from such problem behaviors as delinquency and negative relationships with parents and teachers. Those who tend to go to bed and arise earlier (i.e., morningness) have long been associated with more positive outcomes. In the majority of previous research, however, these concepts have never been adequately tested.

In Sync with Adolescence: The Role of Morningness-Eveningness in Development examines the possible effects of adolescent preferences on problem behavior in different contexts. This volume presents a new way of looking at morningness-eveningness in relation to adolescent development in general and on problem behavior in particular. The study has produced results, the implications of which necessitate a reinterpretation of the current thinking about morningness-eveningness and adolescent adjustment.

This volume should be of particular interest to developmental psychologists and researchers who are interested in examining the role of biological factors in psychological processes as well as to sleep researchers who are interested in both the clinical and behavioral aspects. In addition, it is a valuable resource for clinical child and school psychologists, medical staff, teachers, and anyone who works with adolescents.

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • When we deny our stories, they define us. When we own our stories, we get to write the ending.

Don’t miss the hourlong Netflix special Brené Brown: The Call to Courage!

Social scientist Brené Brown has ignited a global conversation on courage, vulnerability, shame, and worthiness. Her pioneering work uncovered a profound truth: Vulnerability—the willingness to show up and be seen with no guarantee of outcome—is the only path to more love, belonging, creativity, and joy. But living a brave life is not always easy: We are, inevitably, going to stumble and fall.

It is the rise from falling that Brown takes as her subject in Rising Strong. As a grounded theory researcher, Brown has listened as a range of people—from leaders in Fortune 500 companies and the military to artists, couples in long-term relationships, teachers, and parents—shared their stories of being brave, falling, and getting back up. She asked herself, What do these people with strong and loving relationships, leaders nurturing creativity, artists pushing innovation, and clergy walking with people through faith and mystery have in common? The answer was clear: They recognize the power of emotion and they’re not afraid to lean in to discomfort.

Walking into our stories of hurt can feel dangerous. But the process of regaining our footing in the midst of struggle is where our courage is tested and our values are forged. Our stories of struggle can be big ones, like the loss of a job or the end of a relationship, or smaller ones, like a conflict with a friend or colleague. Regardless of magnitude or circumstance, the rising strong process is the same: We reckon with our emotions and get curious about what we’re feeling; we rumble with our stories until we get to a place of truth; and we live this process, every day, until it becomes a practice and creates nothing short of a revolution in our lives. Rising strong after a fall is how we cultivate wholeheartedness. It’s the process, Brown writes, that teaches us the most about who we are.

ONE OF GREATER GOOD’S FAVORITE BOOKS OF THE YEAR

“[Brené Brown’s] research and work have given us a new vocabulary, a way to talk with each other about the ideas and feelings and fears we’ve all had but haven’t quite known how to articulate. . . . Brené empowers us each to be a little more courageous.”—The Huffington Post
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