Contemporary Government Reform in Japan: The Dual State in Flux

Springer
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This book examines several major reforms in Japan - in the postal business, transportation, telecommunications and technology - and evaluates the impact of these changes since the early 1980s. Conceptually, the book presents the dual state as being a fundamental feature of the Japanese political economy that determines government reform dynamics.
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About the author

EIJI KAWABATA is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Minnesota State University, USA.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Sep 18, 2006
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Pages
230
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ISBN
9780230601086
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / General
Political Science / History & Theory
Political Science / International Relations / General
Political Science / World / Asian
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Social Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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