Low Road: The Life and Legacy of Donald Goines

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Donald Goines was a pimp, a truck driver, a heroin addict, a factory worker, and a career criminal. He was also one of world's most popular Black contemporary writers. Having published 16 novels, including Whoreson, Dopefiend, and Daddy Cool, Goines's unique brand of "street narrative" and "ghetto realism" mark him as the original street writer.

Now, in the first in-depth biography of Goines's life, author Eddie B. Allen explores exactly how one man could make the transition from street hustler to bestselling author. With exclusive access to personal letters, treatments from unwritten books, photographs, and family members, Allen uncovers Goines's personal experiences with drugs, prostitutes, prison, and urban violence. Fans of Goines's novels will note a dramatic parallelism between his life and his fictional tales.

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About the author

Eddie B. Allen is a freelance writer and has covered national figures such as Bill Clinton and Louis Farrakhan. He has been published in the New York Times, The Detroit News, the Philadelphia New Observer, and The Michigan Chronicle. He lives in Atlanta, Georgia.

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Additional Information

Publisher
St. Martin's Press
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Published on
May 13, 2008
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9781466838628
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / African American Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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