The Works of the Late Edgar Allan Poe: Poems and tales

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Publisher
Blakeman & Mason
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Published on
Dec 31, 1859
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Pages
528
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Language
English
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This content is DRM free.
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This carefully crafted ebook: “The Best of Edgar Allan Poe: The Tell-Tale Heart, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Masque of the Red Death, The Black Cat, The Murders in the Rue Morgue” contains the Best Tales of Edgar Allan Poe in one volume and is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. The Tell-Tale Heart (1843) Is a short story told by an unnamed narrator who endeavors to convince the reader of his sanity, while describing a murder he committed. The murder is carefully calculated, and the murderer hides the body by dismembering it and hiding it under the floorboards. Fall of the House of Usher (1839) As in all of Poe’s short stories, “The Fall of the House of Usher” concentrates on a “single effect”, in this case, the degeneration and decay of the Usher house and family. The Cask of Amontillado (1846) The story is set in a nameless Italian city in an unspecified year and is about the narrator's deadly revenge on a friend who, he believes, has insulted him. The narrative revolves around a person being buried alive—in this case, by immurement. The Pit and the Pendulum (1842) The short story is about the torments endured by a prisoner of the Spanish Inquisition, though Poe skews historical facts. The narrator of the story describes his experience of being tortured. The story is especially effective at inspiring fear in the reader because of its heavy focus on the senses, such as sound, emphasizing its reality, unlike many of Poe's stories which are aided by the supernatural. The Tell-Tale Heart (1843) It is told by an unnamed narrator who endeavors to convince the reader of his sanity, while describing a murder he committed. The murder is carefully calculated, and the murderer hides the body by dismembering it and hiding it under the floorboards. Ultimately the narrator's guilt manifests itself in the form of the sound — possibly hallucinatory — of the old man's heart still beating under the floorboards. The Masque of the Red Death (1842) The story follows Prince Prospero's attempts to avoid a dangerous plague known as the Red Death by hiding in his abbey. He, along with many other wealthy nobles, has a masquerade ball within seven rooms of his abbey, each decorated with a different color. In the midst of their revelry, a mysterious figure disguised as a Red Death victim enters and makes his way through each of the rooms. The Black Cat (1843) It is a study of the psychology of guilt, often paired in analysis with Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart". In both, a murderer carefully conceals his crime and believes himself unassailable, but eventually breaks down and reveals himself, impelled by a nagging reminder of his guilt. The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841) It has been recognized as the first detective story. C. Auguste Dupin is a man in Paris who solves the mystery of the brutal murder of two women. Numerous witnesses heard a suspect, though no one agrees on what language was spoken. At the murder scene, Dupin finds a hair that does not appear to be human. American author Edgar Allan Poe (1809 – 1849) defined the genre of macabre story-telling in the first half of the 19th century. Poe, known for psychologically thrilling tales with morbid undertones, is generally considered the inventor of the detective fiction genre. He is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction. Today it is regarded as an early and supreme example of Gothic horror, and still stands out among the author's many well-known works.
The story begins with the unnamed narrator arriving at the house of his friend, Roderick Usher, having received a letter from him in a distant part of the country complaining of an illness and asking for his help. Although Poe wrote this short story before the invention of modern psychological science, Roderick's condition can be described according to its terminology. It includes a form of sensory overload known as hyperesthesia (hypersensitivity to textures, light, sounds, smells, and tastes), hypochondria (an excessive preoccupation or worry about having a serious illness), and acute anxiety. It is revealed that Roderick's twin sister, Madeline, is also ill and falls into cataleptic, deathlike trances. The narrator is impressed with Roderick's paintings, and attempts to cheer him by reading with him and listening to his improvised musical compositions on the guitar. Roderick sings "The Haunted Palace," then tells the narrator that he believes the house he lives in to be alive, and that this sentience arises from the arrangement of the masonry and vegetation surrounding it.


Le narrateur (dont l'identité ne nous est pas connue) arrive à la maison de son ami Roderick Usher, ayant reçu de lui une lettre dans laquelle il se plaignait de maladie et réclamait sa présence. Cette maladie se manifeste par une hyper-acuité des sens et une grande anxiété. La sœur jumelle de Roderick, Lady Madeline, est elle aussi malade, tombant dans des états de transes cataleptiques. Après qu'il lui a récité le poème « le Palais hanté », Roderick soutient à son ami que la maison est dotée de sens, ce qui proviendrait de la façon dont la maçonnerie est entremêlée à la végétation entourant le bâtiment. Plus tard, il lui annonce que Lady Madeline est décédée et qu'il a l'intention de conserver son corps durant 15 jours dans un caveau en attendant de procéder à l'enterrement définitif. Après avoir aidé son ami dans cette tâche, le narrateur constate une aggravation rapide de l'état de Roderick. Environ une semaine plus tard, le narrateur reçoit, par une nuit de tempête, la visite de Roderick qui semble très agité. Il tente de le calmer en lui faisant la lecture mais entend divers sons provenant de la maison. Roderick devient finalement hystérique et clame que ces bruits sont causés par sa sœur qu'ils ont en fait enterrée vivante et qu'il le sait depuis plusieurs jours. La porte de la chambre s'ouvre alors violemment et laisse apparaître Lady Madeline, en sang et dans son suaire. Elle avance vers son frère et tombe sur lui alors qu'elle rend le dernier soupir et que lui-même succombe à sa frayeur. Le narrateur fuit alors la maison et, à la lueur d'un éclair, voit la fissure parcourant la maison s'élargir, causant l'écroulement du bâtiment tout entier.
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