History of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology: With an Epilogue on Psychiatry and the Mind-Body Relation

Springer Science & Business Media
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Most of the prefatory issues are extensively elaborated upon in the Prolegomenon, which also contains the complete references to the texts and authors discussed below. Nevertheless, the “Preface” would be grossly incomplete without touching on some of these issues, books, and scholars. Too, many of this book’s chapters (e. g. , Mora’s, Marx’s, D. B. Weiner’s) examine and “reference” important earlier, as well as contemporary, general histories of psychiatry and specialized monographs; in German, French, Italian, and Spanish. Also, in his 1968 Short History of Psychiatry, d- cussed below, Ackerknecht (pp. xi–xii) references important nineteenth and earlier-twentieth century psychiatric histories in English, French, and German. Such citations will of course not be repeated here. Finally, thanks to several publishers’re-editions of dozens of classical psychiatric texts; one can consult their bibliographies as well. See “Prolegomenon” for references to these splendid series. In a rough-and-ready sense, medical history began in classical Greece—for example, On Ancient Medicine. While traditionally included in the Hippocratic corpus, this text seems more likely to have been written by a non- or even anti-Hippocratic doctor. Moreover, the Hippocratic and other schools were hardly as secular as we now suppose. On Epilepsy, for example, does not so much declare the prevalent denotation of it as the “sacred disease” erroneous as it does that it is no more nor less sacred than any other disease.
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About the author

Edwin Wallace IV, M.D., is Professor of Psychiatry and Research Professor of Bioethics at the University of South Carolina. Until 1995 he was Professor and Vice Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior at the Medical College of Georgia. In 1984 he published Historiography and Causation in Psychoanalysis (Analytic Press) and is generally regarded as an expert on the history of psychiatry and medical psychology. Dr. Wallace is a cofounder of the Association for the Advancement of Philosophy and Psychiatry (a 1200-member international organization that publishes a quarterly journal Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology with Johns Hopkins University Press). John Gach is owner and president of John Gach Books, Inc., an antiquarian bookselling firm that has specialized in rare and out-of-print psychiatry, psychoanalysis, psychology, and neuroscience for 35 years. Regarded as a leading authority on the bibliography of books in the fields his firm deals in, Gach has published a number of review essays in journals such as the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, and a chapter in Essays in the History of Psychiatry, edited by Edwin Wallace and Lucius Pressley. Most recently he edited for Thoemmes Press the series Foundations of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, which reprinted both the eighth German edition of Emil Kraepelin's Psychiatrie and the five Kraepelin titles published in English during his lifetime. He has also been engaged in a long term project to describe and comprehend the phenomenology of book collecting, about which topic he has lectured.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Apr 13, 2010
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Pages
862
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ISBN
9780387347080
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Clinical Medicine
Medical / History
Medical / Psychiatry / General
Psychology / History
Psychology / Movements / Psychoanalysis
Science / History
Social Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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