Witness: Passing the Torch of Holocaust Memory to New Generations

Second Story Press
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For 25 years, the March of the Living has organized visits for adults and students from all over the world to Poland, where millions of Jews were enslaved and murdered by Nazi Germany during WWII. The organization's goal is not only to remember and bear witness to the terrible events of the past, but also to look forward. They want to inspire participants to build a world free of oppression and intolerance, a world of freedom, democracy and justice for all members of the human family. Rooted in a touring exhibit launched at the United Nations, this book is a compilation of photographs and text that give firsthand accounts from the survivors who have participated in March of the Living programs, together with reactions and responses from the people, young students in particular, of many faiths and cultures worldwide who have traveled with the group over the years. 
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About the author

Eli Rubenstein is the National Director of The March of the Living Canada. He is a religious leader at a Toronto synagogue founded by Holocaust survivors which sponsors Passover seders for the homeless, Holocaust education programs, and award-winning documentaries.

The March of the Living is an annual educational program that takes students from all over the world to Poland, in order to study the Holocaust. www.marchoftheliving.org 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Second Story Press
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Published on
Sep 8, 2015
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Pages
136
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ISBN
9781772600087
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Holocaust
Photography / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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