Singular Integrals and Differentiability Properties of Functions (PMS-30)

Princeton University Press
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Singular integrals are among the most interesting and important objects of study in analysis, one of the three main branches of mathematics. They deal with real and complex numbers and their functions. In this book, Princeton professor Elias Stein, a leading mathematical innovator as well as a gifted expositor, produced what has been called the most influential mathematics text in the last thirty-five years. One reason for its success as a text is its almost legendary presentation: Stein takes arcane material, previously understood only by specialists, and makes it accessible even to beginning graduate students. Readers have reflected that when you read this book, not only do you see that the greats of the past have done exciting work, but you also feel inspired that you can master the subject and contribute to it yourself.

Singular integrals were known to only a few specialists when Stein's book was first published. Over time, however, the book has inspired a whole generation of researchers to apply its methods to a broad range of problems in many disciplines, including engineering, biology, and finance.


Stein has received numerous awards for his research, including the Wolf Prize of Israel, the Steele Prize, and the National Medal of Science. He has published eight books with Princeton, including Real Analysis in 2005.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Jun 2, 2016
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9781400883882
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Mathematics / Functional Analysis
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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This book develops some of the extraordinary richness, beauty, and power of geometry in two and three dimensions, and the strong connection of geometry with topology. Hyperbolic geometry is the star. A strong effort has been made to convey not just denatured formal reasoning (definitions, theorems, and proofs), but a living feeling for the subject. There are many figures, examples, and exercises of varying difficulty.

This book was the origin of a grand scheme developed by Thurston that is now coming to fruition. In the 1920s and 1930s the mathematics of two-dimensional spaces was formalized. It was Thurston's goal to do the same for three-dimensional spaces. To do this, he had to establish the strong connection of geometry to topology--the study of qualitative questions about geometrical structures. The author created a new set of concepts, and the expression "Thurston-type geometry" has become a commonplace.



Three-Dimensional Geometry and Topology had its origins in the form of notes for a graduate course the author taught at Princeton University between 1978 and 1980. Thurston shared his notes, duplicating and sending them to whoever requested them. Eventually, the mailing list grew to more than one thousand names. The book is the culmination of two decades of research and has become the most important and influential text in the field. Its content also provided the methods needed to solve one of mathematics' oldest unsolved problems--the Poincaré Conjecture.


In 2005 Thurston won the first AMS Book Prize, for Three-dimensional Geometry and Topology. The prize recognizes an outstanding research book that makes a seminal contribution to the research literature. Thurston received the Fields Medal, the mathematical equivalent of the Nobel Prize, in 1982 for the depth and originality of his contributions to mathematics. In 1979 he was awarded the Alan T. Waterman Award, which recognizes an outstanding young researcher in any field of science or engineering supported by the National Science Foundation.

The primary goal of this text is to present the theoretical foundation of the field of Fourier analysis. This book is mainly addressed to graduate students in mathematics and is designed to serve for a three-course sequence on the subject. The only prerequisite for understanding the text is satisfactory completion of a course in measure theory, Lebesgue integration, and complex variables. This book is intended to present the selected topics in some depth and stimulate further study. Although the emphasis falls on real variable methods in Euclidean spaces, a chapter is devoted to the fundamentals of analysis on the torus. This material is included for historical reasons, as the genesis of Fourier analysis can be found in trigonometric expansions of periodic functions in several variables.

While the 1st edition was published as a single volume, the new edition will contain 120 pp of new material, with an additional chapter on time-frequency analysis and other modern topics. As a result, the book is now being published in 2 separate volumes, the first volume containing the classical topics (Lp Spaces, Littlewood-Paley Theory, Smoothness, etc...), the second volume containing the modern topics (weighted inequalities, wavelets, atomic decomposition, etc...).

From a review of the first edition:

“Grafakos’s book is very user-friendly with numerous examples illustrating the definitions and ideas. It is more suitable for readers who want to get a feel for current research. The treatment is thoroughly modern with free use of operators and functional analysis. Morever, unlike many authors, Grafakos has clearly spent a great deal of time preparing the exercises.” - Ken Ross, MAA Online

One of the most important mathematical achievements of the past several decades has been A. Grothendieck's work on algebraic geometry. In the early 1960s, he and M. Artin introduced étale cohomology in order to extend the methods of sheaf-theoretic cohomology from complex varieties to more general schemes. This work found many applications, not only in algebraic geometry, but also in several different branches of number theory and in the representation theory of finite and p-adic groups. Yet until now, the work has been available only in the original massive and difficult papers. In order to provide an accessible introduction to étale cohomology, J. S. Milne offers this more elementary account covering the essential features of the theory.

The author begins with a review of the basic properties of flat and étale morphisms and of the algebraic fundamental group. The next two chapters concern the basic theory of étale sheaves and elementary étale cohomology, and are followed by an application of the cohomology to the study of the Brauer group. After a detailed analysis of the cohomology of curves and surfaces, Professor Milne proves the fundamental theorems in étale cohomology -- those of base change, purity, Poincaré duality, and the Lefschetz trace formula. He then applies these theorems to show the rationality of some very general L-series.

Originally published in 1980.

The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

With this second volume, we enter the intriguing world of complex analysis. From the first theorems on, the elegance and sweep of the results is evident. The starting point is the simple idea of extending a function initially given for real values of the argument to one that is defined when the argument is complex. From there, one proceeds to the main properties of holomorphic functions, whose proofs are generally short and quite illuminating: the Cauchy theorems, residues, analytic continuation, the argument principle.

With this background, the reader is ready to learn a wealth of additional material connecting the subject with other areas of mathematics: the Fourier transform treated by contour integration, the zeta function and the prime number theorem, and an introduction to elliptic functions culminating in their application to combinatorics and number theory.


Thoroughly developing a subject with many ramifications, while striking a careful balance between conceptual insights and the technical underpinnings of rigorous analysis, Complex Analysis will be welcomed by students of mathematics, physics, engineering and other sciences.


The Princeton Lectures in Analysis represents a sustained effort to introduce the core areas of mathematical analysis while also illustrating the organic unity between them. Numerous examples and applications throughout its four planned volumes, of which Complex Analysis is the second, highlight the far-reaching consequences of certain ideas in analysis to other fields of mathematics and a variety of sciences. Stein and Shakarchi move from an introduction addressing Fourier series and integrals to in-depth considerations of complex analysis; measure and integration theory, and Hilbert spaces; and, finally, further topics such as functional analysis, distributions and elements of probability theory.

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