Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series

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The headlines proclaimed the 1919 fix of the World Series and attempted cover-up as "the most gigantic sporting swindle in the history of America!" First published in 1963, Eight Men Out has become a timeless classic. Eliot Asinof has reconstructed the entire scene-by-scene story of the fantastic scandal in which eight Chicago White Sox players arranged with the nation's leading gamblers to throw the Series in Cincinnati. Mr. Asinof vividly describes the tense meetings, the hitches in the conniving, the actual plays in which the Series was thrown, the Grand Jury indictment, and the famous 1921 trial. Moving behind the scenes, he perceptively examines the motives and backgrounds of the players and the conditions that made the improbable fix all too possible. Here, too, is a graphic picture of the American underworld that managed the fix, the deeply shocked newspapermen who uncovered the story, and the war-exhausted nation that turned with relief and pride to the Series, only to be rocked by the scandal. Far more than a superbly told baseball story, this is a compelling slice of American history in the aftermath of World War I and at the cusp of the Roaring Twenties.
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About the author

Eliot Asinof was born in the year of the ill-fated World Series fix. After graduating from Swarthmore College in 1940, he played minor league baseball for the Philadelphia Phillies organization. He wrote numerous books and a variety of plays for television and motion pictures. He lived in Ancramdale, New York, in a house he built with his son.

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Reviews

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Additional Information

Publisher
Holt Paperbacks
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Published on
Apr 1, 2011
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Pages
328
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ISBN
9781429997362
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Sports
Sports & Recreation / Baseball / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Eliot Asinof
Eliot Asinof's newest baseball hero left tiny Gandee, Missouri, as John Clyde Cagle Jr., a hard-throwing lefthander who had pitched a perfect game in high school. Now he returns in triumph as the legendary "Black Jack", superstar of the Los Angeles Dodgers, a stoic, menacing mound demon with a Fu Manchu moustache and a 106-mile-per-hour fastball.

In a nationally televised event that, like everything else in his life, is precisely orchestrated by agent and money manager Gordon Stanley, Jack's return is to dedicate Black Jack Field, the two-million-dollar ballpark he has donated to his hometown. He arrives in a white stretch limo, glamorous girlfriend at his side and the world at his feet,

But he is stung by a spate of bad memories of his boyhood, most painful of which is that of Cyrus Coles, his fat black battery mate who had quietly taught Jack the disciplined pitching that had made him great. Typically now, when Jack throws out the ceremonial first pitch to his father, Vietnam war hero, spit-and-polish sheriff of Gandee, everyone believes the father to be the reason for the son's success.

Then Jack confronts Cyrus's murdered body, blown away by a shotgun blast. He has to face the fury of Cyrus's widow, Ruby, and, most provocative of all, an outspoken woman named Foxx, who makes him aware that he's been living a lie.

Jack flees this unsettling scene with his girlfriend for the pleasures of New York City -- until he learns that, back in Gandee, his father has arrested Ruby for the murder of her husband. To everyone's astonishment, Jack returns to Gandee to help her. With Foxx now an ally, he sees his hometown for its corrupt racist traditions, bringing on a new understanding ofhimself that leads him to risk everything to probe an intolerable truth.

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Eliot Asinof
Eliot Asinof's newest baseball hero left tiny Gandee, Missouri, as John Clyde Cagle Jr., a hard-throwing lefthander who had pitched a perfect game in high school. Now he returns in triumph as the legendary "Black Jack", superstar of the Los Angeles Dodgers, a stoic, menacing mound demon with a Fu Manchu moustache and a 106-mile-per-hour fastball.

In a nationally televised event that, like everything else in his life, is precisely orchestrated by agent and money manager Gordon Stanley, Jack's return is to dedicate Black Jack Field, the two-million-dollar ballpark he has donated to his hometown. He arrives in a white stretch limo, glamorous girlfriend at his side and the world at his feet,

But he is stung by a spate of bad memories of his boyhood, most painful of which is that of Cyrus Coles, his fat black battery mate who had quietly taught Jack the disciplined pitching that had made him great. Typically now, when Jack throws out the ceremonial first pitch to his father, Vietnam war hero, spit-and-polish sheriff of Gandee, everyone believes the father to be the reason for the son's success.

Then Jack confronts Cyrus's murdered body, blown away by a shotgun blast. He has to face the fury of Cyrus's widow, Ruby, and, most provocative of all, an outspoken woman named Foxx, who makes him aware that he's been living a lie.

Jack flees this unsettling scene with his girlfriend for the pleasures of New York City -- until he learns that, back in Gandee, his father has arrested Ruby for the murder of her husband. To everyone's astonishment, Jack returns to Gandee to help her. With Foxx now an ally, he sees his hometown for its corrupt racist traditions, bringing on a new understanding ofhimself that leads him to risk everything to probe an intolerable truth.

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