China Joins the World: Progress and Prospects

Council on Foreign Relations
3
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Since the 1970s, the United States has facilitated China's entry into world affairs. What are the results of the effort to integrate China into the international community at an early stage in its rise? How has the international system affected Chinese behavior, and how has China influenced the international system? Each chapter in this volume explores the record of Chinese participation in a specific issue area: the United Nations, arms control, the environment, human rights, banking and finance, trade, energy, telecommunications, and international law. These in-depth and timely studies reveal considerable success--more than most forecasts expected--but the road ahead may prove tougher than the terrain already covered. In addition to the editors, the contributors include Todd M. Johnson, Samuel S. Kim, Nicholas R. Lardy, Andrew J. Nathan, Margaret M. Pearson, Alexander H. Platt, Lester Ross, Michael D. Swaine, Frederick S. Tipson, and Ko-Yung Tung.
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About the author

Economy is the Fellow for China and Deputy Director of the Asia Studies Program at the Council on Foreign Relations. She directs Council projects on Ais and the environment and U.S.-China relations. She also co-chairs the Woodrow Wilson Center working group on China and the Environment.

LAWRENCE J. KORB is a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and a Senior Adviser to the Center for Defense Information. Prior to joining the Center, he was a Senior Fellow and Director of National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. From July 1998 to October 2002, he was Council Vice President, Director of Studies, and holder of the Maurice Greenberg Chair. Mr. Korb also served as Director of the Center for Public Policy Education and Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution, Dean of the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh, and Vice President of Corporate Operations at the Raytheon Company.

Oksenberg is a Senior Fellow at the Asia Pacific Research Center at Stanford University, where he also is a Professor of Political Science.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Council on Foreign Relations
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Published on
Dec 31, 1999
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Pages
359
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ISBN
9780876092255
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Asia / China
Political Science / International Relations / General
Political Science / Public Policy / Economic Policy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Social States is the first book to systematically test the effects of socialization in international relations--to help explain why players on the world stage may be moved to cooperate when doing so is not in their material power interests. Alastair Iain Johnston carries out his groundbreaking theoretical task through a richly detailed look at China's participation in international security institutions during two crucial decades of the "rise of China," from 1980 to 2000. Drawing on sociology and social psychology, this book examines three microprocesses of socialization--mimicking, social influence, and persuasion--as they have played out in the attitudes of Chinese diplomats active in the Conference on Disarmament, the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban, the Convention on Conventional Weapons, and the ASEAN Regional Forum. Among the key conclusions: Chinese officials in the post-Mao era adopted more cooperative and more self-constraining commitments to arms control and disarmament treaties, thanks to their increasing social interactions in international security institutions.

A New York Times Notable Book

Empress Dowager Cixi (1835–1908) is the most important woman in Chinese history. She ruled China for decades and brought a medieval empire into the modern age.
At the age of sixteen, in a nationwide selection for royal consorts, Cixi was chosen as one of the emperor’s numerous concubines. When he died in 1861, their five-year-old son succeeded to the throne. Cixi at once launched a palace coup against the regents appointed by her husband and made herself the real ruler of China—behind the throne, literally, with a silk screen separating her from her officials who were all male.

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Based on newly available, mostly Chinese, historical documents such as court records, official and private correspondence, diaries and eyewitness accounts, this biography will revolutionize historical thinking about a crucial period in China’s—and the world’s—history. Packed with drama, fast paced and gripping, it is both a panoramic depiction of the birth of modern China and an intimate portrait of a woman: as the concubine to a monarch, as the absolute ruler of a third of the world’s population, and as a unique stateswoman.


From the Hardcover edition.
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