Humboldt: Life on America's Marijuana Frontier

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In the vein of Susan Orlean's The Orchid Thief and Deborah Feldman's Unorthodox, journalist Emily Brady journeys into a secretive subculture--one that marijuana built.

Humboldt: Life on America's Marijuana Frontier

Say the words "Humboldt County" to a stranger and you might receive a knowing grin. The name is infamous, and yet the place, and its inhabitants, have been nearly impenetrable. Until now.

Humboldt is a narrative exploration of an insular community in Northern California, which for nearly 40 years has existed primarily on the cultivation and sale of marijuana. It's a place where business is done with thick wads of cash and savings are buried in the backyard. In Humboldt County, marijuana supports everything from fire departments to schools, but it comes with a heavy price. As legalization looms, the community stands at a crossroads and its inhabitants are deeply divided on the issue--some want to claim their rightful heritage as master growers and have their livelihood legitimized, others want to continue reaping the inflated profits of the black market.

Emily Brady spent a year living with the highly secretive residents of Humboldt County, and her cast of eccentric, intimately drawn characters take us into a fascinating, alternate universe. It's the story of a small town that became dependent on a forbidden plant, and of how everything is changing as marijuana goes mainstream.
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About the author

Emily Brady is a former New York Times reporter. Her writing has also appeared in The Village Voice, Time, Columbia Journalism Review, and Plenty.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Grand Central Publishing
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Published on
Jun 18, 2013
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9781455506774
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional / General
History / United States / 21st Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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