Citizenship after Orientalism: Transforming Political Theory

Springer
Free sample

This edited volume presents a critique of citizenship as exclusively and even originally a European or 'Western' institution. It explores the ways in which we may begin to think differently about citizenship as political subjectivity.
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About the author

Tara Atluri, Independent Researcher, Canada Iker Barbero, University of the Basque Country, Spain Deena Dajani, Education Consultant, UK Jack Harrington, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK Aya Ikegame, University of Tokyo, Japan Alessandra Marino, The Open University, UK Andrea Mura, The Open University, UK Zaki Nahaboo, INTO City University, UK Lisa Pilgram, The Open University, UK Dana Rubin, The Open University, UK Leticia Sabsay, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Apr 29, 2016
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Pages
288
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ISBN
9781137479501
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / General
Political Science / History & Theory
Political Science / International Relations / General
Social Science / General
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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