Aosta Valley Itineraries

Weeklong car trips in Italy

Book 25
Enrico Massetti Publishing
Free sample

Valle d’Aosta is a vertical region, you might say, in the physical sense, for the many high peaks that surround it (including Mont Blanc, the highest mountain in Europe at 4,807 meters). But also for the surprising concentration, in a region of such reduced dimensions, of so many natural splendors, of so many monuments, of so much precious historic and artistic heritage, of a density which evokes, in its vertical aspect, the crowding of skyscrapers in a metropolis where horizontal urban space is scarce and precious.

Aosta, the regional capital and the only province of the Valley, is a city rich in history. Traces of the ancient Augusta Pretoria (the Latin name of Aosta) can easily be seen, such as the magnificent Arch of Augustus (25 B.C.) and the remains of the Roman Theatre.

For Aosta the Middle Ages were anything but dark: as an essential center of commercial traffic with France and Switzerland, the city enjoyed an extended period of prosperity. It is no coincidence that the Cathedral and Cathedral Church of S. Orso, two churches of great beauty, date back to the Middle Ages.

This guide covers visits to the mountain region of Aosta Valley, with the description of several itineraries to visit the valley.

The locations covered are the city of Aosta, the lower valley with its castles, a visit to Cogne and the Gran Paradiso Park, a visit to Morgex, La Thuille and the Piccolo San Bernardo Pass, one to Courmayeur, one to Valpelline and the Gran San Bernardo Pass, and all the villages of the Valtournance Valley.

There are extensive descriptions and photos of the attractions.

It has the listing of many reviews for the best-recommended restaurants for all the locations; you have the necessary information ready: the name, address and telephone number are included in the guide together with the review.

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About the author

Enrico Massetti was born in Milano. Now he lives in Washington DC, USA, but he regularly visit his hometown, and enjoys going around all the places in his home country.

Enrico can be reached at enricomassetti@msn.com

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Additional Information

Publisher
Enrico Massetti Publishing
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Published on
Mar 28, 2018
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Pages
62
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ISBN
9781329006737
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Language
English
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Genres
Travel / Europe / Italy
Travel / Reference
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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If you are planning to tour Europe, you should consider the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of northeastern Italy, bordering on Austria and Slovenia. For simplicity's sake, we abbreviate the region's full name to Friuli. This lovely region may be an ideal vacation spot. You can get classic Italian food and other specialties, and wash it all down with excellent local wine. While Friuli is by no means undiscovered by tourists, you usually won't be fighting crowds to see what you want. Like most regions of Italy, it has belonged to many nations over the years. The area remains multicultural, an exceptional mixture of Italian, Austrian, and Slavic influences.

Trieste, with a population of about two hundred thousand, is the region's largest city. Trieste was definitely part and parcel of Mittel Europa (Central Europe) as the principal port of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Trieste only joined Italy in 1954. One can easily imagine that with such a unique history Trieste is quite a unique place to visit. It is.

As soon as you arrive in Trieste, you'll notice its ubiquitous coffee houses. Among the best known is the Antico Caffe San Marco. As befits its internationality, Trieste is home to a variety of historic religious buildings representing many faiths. The Serbian-Orthodox church of the Holy Trinity and Saint Spyridon, which was built in the mid-Nineteenth Century shows strong Byzantine influence. Go inside for a look at its beautiful frescoes and icons. The Israelite Temple of Trieste, just over a century old, is Italy's largest synagogue. The Trieste Cathedral dedicated to the city's patron saint, San Guisto (Saint Justus) who was martyred at the beginning of the Fourth Century, was initially built in the Sixth Century on Roman ruins. It is adjacent to a castle of the same name. Walk on its ramparts for an excellent view of the city and its surroundings. There is no shortage of other churches and museums to visit.

This is a guide to a trip in the Friuli region of Italy: passing through Grado, Lignano, Aquileia, Trieste, Pordenone, Udine, and touching the mountains of Friuli, the Carnia, Tarvisio, and Sequals.

There are extensive descriptions and photos of the attractions.

It contains many reviews for the best-recommended restaurants that are at the location described.

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2019 edition

The Amalfi Coast is without a doubt the most spectacular and beautiful coastline in Italy. Moorish style villages cling to the dramatic jagged cliffs, perched over the rippling waves below. The air is scented with lemons and wild herbs, and of course the sea. The villages that string along the Amalfi Coast have cobblestoned streets lined with bougainvillea-covered villas, Arabic arches, and many corners with million dollar views.

The magic of the Costa Amalfitana is that while it is a magnet for jet-setters and home to a multitude of ultra-luxury five-star hotels, Michelin starred restaurants and yachts, what characterizes the region is its effortless Mediterranean simplicity. You can base an unforgettable weekend at a romantic small hotel in Positano.

Food and wine are highlights of the Amalfi Coast, and should always be a focus on your tours. Fresh seafood, juicy vegetables drizzled in olive oil, aromatic local wines this is the materia prima; or raw material that the region is rightly famous for. Local gastronomic gems include creamy Mozzarella di Bufala, Limoncello made with ripe Sorrento lemons, and San Marzano tomatoes (known all over the world). Traditional dishes are simple and delicious such as Gnocchi alla Sorrentina (with tomato and basil), pepata di cozze (spicy mussels) and the delicious Spaghetti alle vongole con Pomodoro (spaghetti with clams and tomatoes). Vineyards are scattered through the sun-baked coast and inland in the Sorrento Peninsula and greater Campania. Grapes were brought to Campania by the Ancient Greeks, and fabulous wines are being made by cult producers with such noble grapes as the white Falanghina grape and the black Aglianico (which actually means Hellenica).

This guide leads you in a drive in the Amalfi Coast, starting from Salerno and touching Vietri Sul Mare, Cetara, Erchie, Minori, Ravello, Amalfi, the Emerald Grotto, Furore, Positano to arrive in Sorrento.

It includes photos and descriptions of the attractions of all the localities touched.

It contains many reviews for the best-recommended restaurants that are at the location described.

2019 edition

In Bari – Apulia’s capital city – they say: “If Paris were by the sea, it would be like a small Bari.” Presumption or arrogance? No, just pride (for which these people are famous, apart from their strong sense of humor). The pride of living in a city that successfully blends art and deep historical roots with a very modern spirit of business enterprise. Traditionally the “land’s end” that bridged Italy with the worlds of Greece and the Middle East, Bari enjoyed its “golden age” during medieval times.

The Cathedral and Church of St. Nicholas with their Romanesque forms bear majestic witness to that period. Traces of the ancient trading and social contacts with the Greek world can be seen in the Archaeological Museum.

The blend of history and art that characterizes the monuments of Bari is reflected in many areas of Apulia, where you will often discover cathedrals built during the medieval era such as in Brindisi, Andria, Barletta, Trani, Ruvo di Puglia, Lucera, Troia, Manfredonia, Otranto, and Gallipoli. Belonging to another era yet equally precious and extraordinary is the flourishing of the baroque architecture in the town of Lecce.

This guide leads you in a fifteen days visit to Apulia, starting from Ortona a Mare and going through Vasto, Campobasso, Lucera, Foggia, Troia, Melfi, Potenza, Gravina, Matera, Taranto, Gallipoli, Otranto, Lecce, Brindisi, Alberobello with its Trulli, Bari, Barletta, Trani, Castel del Monte, the Gargano peninsula, Termoli, to end up again in Ortona al Mare.

It includes photos and descriptions of the attractions, as well as travel info.

It includes info on the food of Apulia.



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From the Mediterranean to the Alps, from fine art to fine pasta: with Rick Steves on your side, Italy can be yours! Inside Rick Steves Italy 2019 you'll find:
Comprehensive coverage for planning a multi-week trip to ItalyRick's strategic advice on how to get the most out of your time and money, with rankings of his must-see favoritesTop sights and hidden gems, from the Colosseum and Michelangelo's David to corner trattorias and that perfect scoop of gelatoHow to connect with local culture: Walk in Caesar's footsteps of through the ruins of the Forum, discover the relaxed rhythms of sunny Cinque Terre, or chat with fans about the latest soccer match (calcio, to locals) Beat the crowds, skip the lines, and avoid tourist traps with Rick's candid, humorous insightThe best places to eat, sleep, and experience la dolce far nienteSelf-guided walking tours of lively neighborhoods and incredible museumsVital trip-planning tools, like how to link destinations, build your itinerary, and get from place to place Detailed maps, including a fold-out map for exploring on the goUseful resources including a packing list, Italian phrase book, a historical overview, and recommended readingOver 1,000 bible-thin pages include everything worth seeing without weighing you downAnnually updated information on Venice, Padua, The Dolomites, Lake Country, Milan, Italian Riviera, Florence, Pisa, Lucca, Hill Towns of Central Italy, Siena, Tuscany, Rome, Naples, Pompeii, Capri, the Amalfi Coast, and much moreMake the most of every day and every dollar with Rick Steves Italy 2019.

Planning a one- to two-week trip? Check out Rick Steves Best of Italy. Want to explore off-the-beaten-path Italy instead? Pick up Rick Steves Sicily.
2019 edition

The Amalfi Coast is without a doubt the most spectacular and beautiful coastline in Italy. Moorish style villages cling to the dramatic jagged cliffs, perched over the rippling waves below. The air is scented with lemons and wild herbs, and of course the sea. The villages that string along the Amalfi Coast have cobblestoned streets lined with bougainvillea-covered villas, Arabic arches, and many corners with million dollar views.

The magic of the Costa Amalfitana is that while it is a magnet for jet-setters and home to a multitude of ultra-luxury five-star hotels, Michelin starred restaurants and yachts, what characterizes the region is its effortless Mediterranean simplicity. You can base an unforgettable weekend at a romantic small hotel in Positano.

Food and wine are highlights of the Amalfi Coast, and should always be a focus on your tours. Fresh seafood, juicy vegetables drizzled in olive oil, aromatic local wines this is the materia prima; or raw material that the region is rightly famous for. Local gastronomic gems include creamy Mozzarella di Bufala, Limoncello made with ripe Sorrento lemons, and San Marzano tomatoes (known all over the world). Traditional dishes are simple and delicious such as Gnocchi alla Sorrentina (with tomato and basil), pepata di cozze (spicy mussels) and the delicious Spaghetti alle vongole con Pomodoro (spaghetti with clams and tomatoes). Vineyards are scattered through the sun-baked coast and inland in the Sorrento Peninsula and greater Campania. Grapes were brought to Campania by the Ancient Greeks, and fabulous wines are being made by cult producers with such noble grapes as the white Falanghina grape and the black Aglianico (which actually means Hellenica).

This guide leads you in a drive in the Amalfi Coast, starting from Salerno and touching Vietri Sul Mare, Cetara, Erchie, Minori, Ravello, Amalfi, the Emerald Grotto, Furore, Positano to arrive in Sorrento.

It includes photos and descriptions of the attractions of all the localities touched.

It contains many reviews for the best-recommended restaurants that are at the location described.

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