Calabria

Enrico Massetti Publishing
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Often called the Switzerland of the South, Calabria covers the mountainous toe of Italy. Here one finds the most beautiful forests, and the hillsides are covered with the white leaves of ancient olive trees.

Traveling between the Calabrian mountains, in a vast land of magnificent beauty, you are in a region bounded with two seas of approximately eight hundred kilometers coasts, where for this particular configuration, incalculable views are present and where the nature has plot in a magnificent way the lines that talent and human work must follow, or art efforts can improve.

Closed in the north with the Pollino and Orsomarso imponent relieves, Calabria has a predominantly territory mountainous, vast green reserves, and lakes with robust splendor inside Sila, demoted summit to peak into the sea on the Range Coast, very high silver firs and rushing streams on the Serre, the last window on the Mediterranean between the Aspromonte summits.

Calabria’s 800 km of pristine coastline are described in detail, as well as the Nature parks and reserves. The Sports available are included.

This guide also leads you in a drive through Calabria, starting from Maratea and then going to Papasidero, Cosenza, the Sila mountains, Crotone, Pizzo Calabro, Tropea and Capo Vaticano, Locri, Pentedattilo, to end up in Reggio Calabria.

It includes photos and descriptions of the attractions of all the localities touched, as well as travel info.

It includes info on regional food.

It contains many reviews for the best-recommended restaurants that are at the location described; you have the necessary information ready: the name, address and telephone number are included in the guide together with the review.

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About the author

Enrico Massetti was born in Milano. Now he lives in Washington DC, USA, but he regularly visit his hometown, and enjoys going around all the places in his home country.

 Enrico can be reached at enricomassetti@msn.com.

 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Enrico Massetti Publishing
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Published on
Jul 2, 2018
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Pages
52
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ISBN
9781312881365
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Language
English
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Genres
Travel / Europe / Italy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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‘Lake Como’ is a name you will often hear from friends or read in travel blogs if you are planning a vacation in Italy. The third largest lake in Italy is a hit amongst vacationers, and there are plenty of reasons behind it. So, let’s underline everything that you would like to know about the area before reaching a vacation decision.

Where exactly is it?

Lake Como has a glacial origin and is in the region of Lombardy, Italy. Considered as one of the most beautiful lakes in Italy, Como is located between Milan and the border of Switzerland.

Why is it so famous?

Those who are unfamiliar with the charm of Lake Como often wonder why it garners so much attention. Why people fly from all around the world to see just a lake? Well, the answer the query is that Lake Como is not just any lake; it is marked by one of the best properties, natural beauty, mountains, picturesque villages, adventure sports options and, last but not the least, pure luxury of Lake Como holiday villas.

Apart from the cultural heritage of historic villas and waterfront cottages, Lake Como area also offers plenty of scope for outdoor activities like hiking, trekking, and biking. The lake itself provides avenues of kite surfing, sailing, yachting, windsurfing, and fishing. Ladies especially fall in love with the boutiques that mark the place, and men with golfing in Lake Como area.

Who visits Lake Como?

The hot holiday spot is frequented by vacationers from all around the world that crave a quaint, peaceful holiday in the lap of nature. The rich and famous too chose Lake Como to spend time away from the flashlights. Celebrities like Madonna, George Clooney, Gianni Versace, Ronaldinho, Sylvester Stallone, and Richard Branson maintain holiday homes near the shores of the lake. If you too are looking forward to the similar experience, then, Lake Como Villas for rent are readily available.

This guide covers the Lake Como, and the towns of Como, Bellagio, Menaggio, and Varenna, in addition to the one-day trips you can make from one of these towns to Piona, Villa Carlotta, and Villa del Balbianello.

There are extensive descriptions and photos of the attractions.

This guide contains links to the websites of train and navigation companies, so you can check the latest schedule and buy the tickets.

It is no mistake that Bellagio is called the "pearl" of Lake Como. It is undoubtedly the most famous resort on the lake. For centuries, Bellagio's scenic location has enchanted artists and writers, not only from Italy but also from abroad. It is situated on the tip of a headland that divides the lake into the two legs of Como and Lecco.

The town stretches along the coast, and part of it goes up the slopes of the peninsula.

Because of its location Bellagio has a great variety of views; indeed, it offers a good view of the whole lake. On the northern horizon, one can see the Pre-Alps.

Some of the best views can be seen from the top of Monte San Primo and from the park of Villa Serbelloni. On a particularly bright day, one can make out the Alps, from Mont Blanc to the Ortles, and the Madonnina on top of the Duomo of Milan.

Both the historic center situated at a higher level dominated by the Romanesque Basilica Of San Giacomo (enlarged in the Baroque Age) and the more recent arcade lake-front are all preserved intact. Among the aristocratic villas let's remember Villa Serbelloni, first castle, then country residence and transformed into a villa at the end of the 15th century. Later once again restructured in the 17th and turned into a hotel during the last decade of the 19th century, it is presently appointed headquarters of conventions and study tours.

This guide covers Bellagio on Lake Como, from Lecco – Varenna, or, in an alternative, via Como. It covers also day trips with public transportation with the boats to towns and attractions on the lake.

There are extensive descriptions and photos of the attractions.

This guide contains many reviews for the best-recommended restaurants that are at walking distance from the boat pier or the train station.

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You don't need a car to escape from the business, the traffic, the congestion, the fog in wintertime and the afa, the humid heat, in summer, of the city to a beautiful world of lakes, mountains, castles and good food: just take the train and, sometimes, the boat as recommended in the following itinerary. This trip is especially recommended during spring or autumn when you can leave the fog and cold of Milan and reach the sunny lakefront views in the mild climate of the Lake Maggiore.

In Stresa, trolling over the stone patchwork walks of Corso Italia you can gaze to your right and see the majesty of the massive lake. Towering Swiss Alps seem to encircle you in their beauty and silhouetted shapes. The islands of Isola Bella, Pescatori and Madre seem to like green oases in the flat waters of Maggiore. On the left, you can stroll by some of the grandest European hotels each adorned with flowered balconies, ornate, and the pampered lawns.

Lake Maggiore has refused the big industry that nearby Como has accepted with open arms. Como with its city-like pace, fancy shops, and crowded streets seems a world away from the calm comforting and gentle vibe of towns like Stresa and Baveno. Maggiore feels as it was frozen in time, stopped somehow in its most glorious moment.

Baveno with its short lakeside walkways, hip local cafes and family run pizzerias. On the shore are grand hotels boasting marble adorned bathrooms, dual balconies and gold trimmed doors; it's not gaudy, it's elegant in the most European way.

This is a  guide to a one-day visit to Stresa, the on Lake Maggiore.

It is ideal for use on your smartphone.

It also has a listing of many reviews for the best recommended restaurants that are at walking distance from the train station.

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Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher

Lonely Planet Pocket Venice is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Absorb the architecture and mosaics at Basilica di San Marco, cruise the Grand Canal aboard a gondola, trace the development of Venetian art at the Gallerie dell'Accademia; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of the best of Venice and begin your journey now!

Inside Lonely Planet Pocket Venice:

Full-colour maps and images throughout Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests Insider tips to save time and money and get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots Essential info at your fingertips - hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, prices Honest reviews for all budgets - eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, hidden gems that most guidebooks miss User-friendly layout with helpful icons, and organised by neighbourhood to help you pick the best spots to spend your time Covers San Marco & the Palazzo Ducale, Dorsoduro & the Accademia, San Polo & Santa Croce, Cannaregio & the Ghetto, and more

eBook Features: (Best viewed on tablet devices and smartphones)

Downloadable PDF and offline maps prevent roaming and data charges Effortlessly navigate and jump between maps and reviews Add notes to personalise your guidebook experience Seamlessly flip between pages Bookmarks and speedy search capabilities get you to key pages in a flash Embedded links to recommendations' websites Zoom-in maps and images Inbuilt dictionary for quick referencing

The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet Pocket Venice, a colorful, easy-to-use, and handy guide that literally fits in your pocket, provides on-the-go assistance for those seeking only the can't-miss experiences to maximize a quick trip experience.

About Lonely Planet: Lonely Planet is a leading travel media company and the world’s number one travel guidebook brand, providing both inspiring and trustworthy information for every kind of traveler since 1973. Over the past four decades, we’ve printed over 145 million guidebooks and grown a dedicated, passionate global community of travelers. You’ll also find our content online, and in mobile apps, video, 14 languages, nine international magazines, armchair and lifestyle books, ebooks, and more.

Important Notice: The digital edition of this book may not contain all of the images found in the physical edition.

At its most expansive, the Roman Empire stretched from the British Isles to Egypt; Rome was the ancient world's greatest superpower. Roman Architecture: A Visual Guide is an illustrated introduction to the great buildings and engineering marvels of Rome and its empire. Published as a companion volume to Diana E. E. Kleiner's course on Roman Architecture given through Coursera (first offered in January 2014 but based on a class she has long taught at Yale), this enhanced e-book explores not only Rome but also buildings preserved at Pompeii, Herculaneum, Ostia, Tivoli, North Italy, Sicily, France, Spain, Germany, Greece, Turkey, Croatia, Jordan, Lebanon, and North Africa. Beginning with the birth of Rome as an Iron Age village, Roman Architecture traces the growth and expansion of the Roman Empire through its cities, which featured civic, religious, commercial, entertainment, and residential districts in the urban setting. A valuable resource for both the student and the traveler, Roman Architecture features over 250 photographs and site plans of the most intriguing and consequential buildings in the Roman Empire. These are presented from the fresh perspective of an author who has journeyed to nearly all of the sites, revealing most of them through her own digital images. In addition, this interactive e-book makes learning about these monuments easier than ever, with handy maps and geolocation links that show you just where the monuments are and, if you're traveling, how to get there. Suitable for the classroom and as a guidebook, Roman Architecture is a fascinating introduction to some of history's most compelling and influential architecture.

If you are planning to tour Europe, you should consider the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of northeastern Italy, bordering on Austria and Slovenia. For simplicity's sake, we abbreviate the region's full name to Friuli. This lovely region may be an ideal vacation spot. You can get classic Italian food and other specialties, and wash it all down with excellent local wine. While Friuli is by no means undiscovered by tourists, you usually won't be fighting crowds to see what you want. Like most regions of Italy, it has belonged to many nations over the years. The area remains multicultural, an exceptional mixture of Italian, Austrian, and Slavic influences.

Trieste, with a population of about two hundred thousand, is the region's largest city. Trieste was definitely part and parcel of Mittel Europa (Central Europe) as the principal port of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Trieste only joined Italy in 1954. One can easily imagine that with such a unique history Trieste is quite a unique place to visit. It is.

As soon as you arrive in Trieste, you'll notice its ubiquitous coffee houses. Among the best known is the Antico Caffe San Marco. As befits its internationality, Trieste is home to a variety of historic religious buildings representing many faiths. The Serbian-Orthodox church of the Holy Trinity and Saint Spyridon, which was built in the mid-Nineteenth Century shows strong Byzantine influence. Go inside for a look at its beautiful frescoes and icons. The Israelite Temple of Trieste, just over a century old, is Italy's largest synagogue. The Trieste Cathedral dedicated to the city's patron saint, San Guisto (Saint Justus) who was martyred at the beginning of the Fourth Century, was initially built in the Sixth Century on Roman ruins. It is adjacent to a castle of the same name. Walk on its ramparts for an excellent view of the city and its surroundings. There is no shortage of other churches and museums to visit.

This is a guide to a trip in the Friuli region of Italy: passing through Grado, Lignano, Aquileia, Trieste, Pordenone, Udine, and touching the mountains of Friuli, the Carnia, Tarvisio, and Sequals.

There are extensive descriptions and photos of the attractions.

It contains many reviews for the best-recommended restaurants that are at the location described.

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Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher

Lonely Planet Italy is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Wander through chariot-grooved streets in Pompeii, sample the abundant varieties of wine and olives as you tour Tuscany, or toss a coin into the Trevi Fountain in Rome; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Italy and begin your journey now!

Inside Lonely Planet Italy Travel Guide:

Full-colour maps and images throughout Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests Insider tips to save time and money and get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots Essential info at your fingertips - hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, prices Honest reviews for all budgets - eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, hidden gems that most guidebooks miss Cultural insights give you a richer, more rewarding travel experience - including history, art, literature, cinema, music, architecture, politics, cuisine, wine, customs Covers Rome, Turin, Piedmont, the Italian Riviera, Milan, the Lakes, Dolomites, Venice, Emilia-Romagna, Florence, Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzo, Naples, Campania, Puglia, Sicily, Sardinia and more

eBook Features: (Best viewed on tablet devices and smartphones)

Downloadable PDF and offline maps prevent roaming and data charges Effortlessly navigate and jump between maps and reviews Add notes to personalise your guidebook experience Seamlessly flip between pages Bookmarks and speedy search capabilities get you to key pages in a flash Embedded links to recommendations' websites Zoom-in maps and images Inbuilt dictionary for quick referencing

The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet Italy, our most comprehensive guide to Italy, is perfect for both exploring top sights and taking roads less travelled.

About Lonely Planet: Lonely Planet is a leading travel media company and the world’s number one travel guidebook brand, providing both inspiring and trustworthy information for every kind of traveler since 1973. Over the past four decades, we’ve printed over 145 million guidebooks and grown a dedicated, passionate global community of travelers. You’ll also find our content online, and in mobile apps, video, 14 languages, nine international magazines, armchair and lifestyle books, ebooks, and more.

Important Notice: The digital edition of this book may not contain all of the images found in the physical edition.

“A little village stretching like an arch of the moon around a quiet basin. Never have I felt the way I did when I walked into that green indefiniteness, with such a sense of peace and fulfilment”.
From Vie Errante by Guy de Maupassant

It was Pliny who first described this stunning natural area and named it ‘Portus Delphini’. This over time was corrupted to Portofino.

Portofino is a typical fisherman village of the Ligurian Riviera which has become one of the most renowned tourist spots in all of Italy, best known in all the world for its tall colored houses situated in a semicircular formation around the small port and piazza.

Portofino and the Tigullio Gulf are symbols representing Italy throughout the world. The coast is a sequence of fashionable resorts with their marinas, pastel-colored houses, first-rate sports facilities and the seductive atmosphere of the Dolce Vita.

But perhaps the most striking thing for the traveler is the beauty of the seascapes, with some of the most celebrated views in Italy, suspended between the intense blue of the sea and the green mountains.

The area of Portofino boasts an exceptional natural heritage that includes traces of rural and nautical civilizations, splendid religious architecture, and clusters of rural houses surrounded by tiny orchards and sections of land planted with grape vines and olive trees.

This is a guide to a visit to Portofino and the towns of nearby Riviera del Levante, from Sestri Levante to Genoa, including Sestri Levante, Santa Margherita Ligure, Camogli, San Fruttuoso and the villages of the Cinque Terre.

There are extensive descriptions and photos of the attractions.

It contains many reviews for the best recommended restaurants that are at the location described.


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