The New Digital Age: Transforming Nations, Businesses, and Our Lives

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In an unparalleled collaboration, two leading global thinkers in technology and foreign affairs give us their widely anticipated, transformational vision of the future: a world where everyone is connected—a world full of challenges and benefits that are ours to meet and to harness.

Eric Schmidt is one of Silicon Valley’s great leaders, having taken Google from a small startup to one of the world’s most influential companies. Jared Cohen is the director of Google Ideas and a former adviser to secretaries of state Condoleezza Rice and Hillary Clinton. With their combined knowledge and experiences, the authors are uniquely positioned to take on some of the toughest questions about our future: Who will be more powerful in the future, the citizen or the state? Will technology make terrorism easier or harder to carry out? What is the relationship between privacy and security, and how much will we have to give up to be part of the new digital age?

In this groundbreaking book, Schmidt and Cohen combine observation and insight to outline the promise and peril awaiting us in the coming decades. At once pragmatic and inspirational, this is a forward-thinking account of where our world is headed and what this means for people, states and businesses.

With the confidence and clarity of visionaries, Schmidt and Cohen illustrate just how much we have to look forward to—and beware of—as the greatest information and technology revolution in human history continues to evolve. On individual, community and state levels, across every geographical and socioeconomic spectrum, they reveal the dramatic developments—good and bad—that will transform both our everyday lives and our understanding of self and society, as technology advances and our virtual identities become more and more fundamentally real.

As Schmidt and Cohen’s nuanced vision of the near future unfolds, an urban professional takes his driverless car to work, attends meetings via hologram and dispenses housekeeping robots by voice; a Congolese fisherwoman uses her smart phone to monitor market demand and coordinate sales (saving on costly refrigeration and preventing overfishing); the potential arises for “virtual statehood” and “Internet asylum” to liberate political dissidents and oppressed minorities, but also for tech-savvy autocracies (and perhaps democracies) to exploit their citizens’ mobile devices for ever more ubiquitous surveillance. Along the way, we meet a cadre of international figures—including Julian Assange—who explain their own visions of our technology-saturated future.

Inspiring, provocative and absorbing, The New Digital Age is a brilliant analysis of how our hyper-connected world will soon look, from two of our most prescient and informed public thinkers.
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About the author

ERIC SCHMIDT is executive chairman of Google, where he served as chief executive officer from 2001 to 2011. A member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, Schmidt also chairs the board of the New America Foundation and is a trustee of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey.

JARED COHEN is director of Google Ideas and an Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is a Rhodes Scholar and the author of several books, including Children of Jihad and One Hundred Days of Silence. He is a member of the Director’s Advisory Board at the National Counterterrorism Center.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Vintage
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Published on
Apr 23, 2013
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Pages
336
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ISBN
9780307961105
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Computers / History
Political Science / History & Theory
Science / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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George Dyson
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Nate Silver
One of Wall Street Journal's Best Ten Works of Nonfiction in 2012
 
New York Times Bestseller

“Not so different in spirit from the way public intellectuals like John Kenneth Galbraith once shaped discussions of economic policy and public figures like Walter Cronkite helped sway opinion on the Vietnam War…could turn out to be one of the more momentous books of the decade.”
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"Nate Silver's The Signal and the Noise is The Soul of a New Machine for the 21st century."
—Rachel Maddow, author of Drift

"A serious treatise about the craft of prediction—without academic mathematics—cheerily aimed at lay readers. Silver's coverage is polymathic, ranging from poker and earthquakes to climate change and terrorism."
—New York Review of Books

Nate Silver built an innovative system for predicting baseball performance, predicted the 2008 election within a hair’s breadth, and became a national sensation as a blogger—all by the time he was thirty. He solidified his standing as the nation's foremost political forecaster with his near perfect prediction of the 2012 election. Silver is the founder and editor in chief of the website FiveThirtyEight. 
 
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In keeping with his own aim to seek truth from data, Silver visits the most successful forecasters in a range of areas, from hurricanes to baseball, from the poker table to the stock market, from Capitol Hill to the NBA. He explains and evaluates how these forecasters think and what bonds they share. What lies behind their success? Are they good—or just lucky? What patterns have they unraveled? And are their forecasts really right? He explores unanticipated commonalities and exposes unexpected juxtapositions. And sometimes, it is not so much how good a prediction is in an absolute sense that matters but how good it is relative to the competition. In other cases, prediction is still a very rudimentary—and dangerous—science.

Silver observes that the most accurate forecasters tend to have a superior command of probability, and they tend to be both humble and hardworking. They distinguish the predictable from the unpredictable, and they notice a thousand little details that lead them closer to the truth. Because of their appreciation of probability, they can distinguish the signal from the noise.

With everything from the health of the global economy to our ability to fight terrorism dependent on the quality of our predictions, Nate Silver’s insights are an essential read.
Leigh Eric Schmidt
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Eric Schmidt
Descubre cómo alcanzar el éxito en tu carrera tomando el modelo de los creativos de Google.

Descubre cómo alcanzar el éxito en tu carrera tomando el modelo de los creativos de Google.

En una era en que todo se está acelerando, la mejor forma de que las empresas triunfen es atraer a personas creativo-inteligentes y darles un lugar para que prosperen a su medida.

Mientras Larry hablaba, Jonathan comprendió que los ingenieros a los que se refería su jefe no eran ingenieros en el sentido tradicional. Sí, eran programadores y diseñadores de sistemas brillantes, pero junto con su experiencia técnica profunda, muchos de ellos también sabían de negocios y poseían una dosis saludable de creatividad. Como tenían un pasado académico, Larry y Sergey habían dado a esos empleados libertad y poder inusuales. Dirigirlos con las estructuras de planeación tradicionales no serviría; podía guiarlos, pero también los limitaría. "¿Por qué querrías hacer eso?", preguntó Larry a Jonathan. "Eso sería estúpido."

El presidente ejecutivo y ex director general Eric Schmidt y el ex vicepresidente senior de productos Jonathan Rosenberg llegaron a Google hace más de una década como probados ejecutivos de tecnología. En ese tiempo, la compañía ya era reconocida por hacer las cosas de forma diferente, lo que reflejaba los principios visionarios -y frecuentemente disidentes- de los fundadores Larry Page y Sergey Brin. Si Eric y Jonathan iban a triunfar, se dieron cuenta, tendrían que reaprender todo lo que creían saber acerca del management y los negocios.

Hoy, Google es un ícono global que cotidianamente sobrepasa los límites de la innovación en una variedad de campos. Cómo trabaja Google es un texto introductorio, entretenido y adictivo, que contiene las lecciones que Eric y Jonathan aprendieron mientras ayudaban a la compañía a crecer. Los autores explican cómo la tecnología ha cambiado el balance del poder, desde las compañías hacia los consumidores, y que la única forma de triunfar en este panorama cambiante se encuentra en crear productos superiores y atraer a un nuevo tipo de empleados multifacéticos, que Eric y Jonathan llaman "creativos inteligentes".

Abarcando temas como la cultura corporativa, la estrategia, el talento, la toma de decisiones, la comunicación, la innovación y el cómo lidiar con los trastornos en el mercado, los autores ilustran máximas del management ("El consenso requiere disensión", "Exilio a los villanos, pero lucha por las divas", "Piensa en 10X, no en 10 por ciento".) con numerosas anécdotas de empleados que forman parte de la historia de Google; muchas las comparten aquí por primera vez.

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