Solar Sketching

The Patrick Moore Practical Astronomy Series

Book 178
Free sample

From the authors of Sketching the Moon comes a comprehensive guide filled with richly illustrated, detailed drawing tutorials that cover a variety of solar phenomena. Explanations of what to expect visually from white light, Hydrogen-alpha and Calcium K filters are provided for those new to solar observing, along with essential tips on equipment, observing techniques and the practicalities of drawing at the eyepiece. Time-honored, traditional methods and media are described in tandem with innovative techniques developed and shared by contemporary astronomical sketchers. For the technically minded, detailed descriptions are given on how to use image manipulation software to bring your sketches to life through animation.

The Sun is the most visually dynamic object in our solar system and offers compelling, spectacular views. Knotted magnetic field lines give rise to powerful eruptions and form the intricate sunspots and arching prominences that make our nearest star one of the most exciting, yet challenging, astronomical objects to sketch. Facilitated by the availability of affordable dedicated solar telescopes and filters, the Sun has become an increasingly popular target amongst astronomical sketchers. The use of narrowband solar filters provides a wonderful opportunity to capture views of the Sun that have, until recently, been largely inaccessible.

You’ll discover easy to follow, step-by-step instructions geared toward your specific interests, be it technical sketching and contributing to science, personal study, or even fun solar outreach activities that help children learn through art. By using Solar Sketching as a reference, drawing the Sun has never been easier.

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About the author

Erika Rix is a Columnist and Contributing Editor for Astronomy magazine and presenter for astronomical sketching and sketching workshops. She is a co-author of Astronomical Sketching: A Step-by-Step Introduction (Springer 2007) and of Sketching the Moon – An Astronomical Artist’s Guide (Springer 2012). Additionally, she is a member of the administration team for Cloudy Nights Telescope Reviews forum and has astronomical sketches and articles published widely on astronomy sites (including Spaceweather, LOPD, ASOD, ALPO), astronomy newsletters, magazines and books.

Kim Hay is presently the Sunspot Report Coordinator for the AAVSO, and Solar Section Coordinator for the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers (ALPO). She is the author of the Solar Observing Section in the RASC Observer’s Handbook and was also part of the Canadian IYA2009 team that helped to promote IYA2009 and Astronomy with public outreach. Kim has sketched the sun for over 20 years to observe its activity and published an article in the RASC Journal December 2009 Vol.103, entitled Solar Observing 1999-2009. She is currently the President of the RASC-Kingston Centre and long time member.

Sally Russell has given numerous presentations and workshops on astronomical sketching to local astronomy societies. Her astronomical sketches have been published online, principally at Cloudy Night Telescope Reviews, LPOD, ASOD, the National Maritime Museum, and in various BAA and SPA section online journals and newsletters, as well as in various UK astronomical magazines. Sally is a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society (FRAS), a Member of the British Astronomical Association (BAA), and of the Society for Popular Astronomy (SPA).

Richard Handy is webmaster for Astronomy Sketch of the Day, a non-profit website. He was a co-author of Astronomical Sketching: A Step-by-Step Introduction (Springer 2007) and of Sketching the Moon – An Astronomical

Artist’s Guide (Springer 2012). His lunar sketch work has been widely published on the Internet, particularly at Cloudy Nights Telescope Reviews, where he is proud to be a “Star Contributor.” Several of Rich’s sketches and narratives were selected for Lunar Photo of the Day (Charles Wood’s LPOD website). Richard is a member of the San Diego Astronomical Society, and a Member of the Association of Lunar Planetary Observers (ALPO).

Erika, Sally and Richard had their sketches selected for display at the International Year of Astronomy 2009 Astronomical Art Exhibit held in Birr Castle in Ireland.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Sep 9, 2015
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Pages
424
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ISBN
9781493929016
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Teaching Methods & Materials / Arts & Humanities
Education / Teaching Methods & Materials / General
Nature / Sky Observation
Science / Astronomy
Science / Physics / Astrophysics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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“Lessons from the Masters” includes a brilliant body of recognized leaders in astronomical imaging, assembled by Robert Gendler, who delivers the most current, sophisticated and useful information on digital enhancement techniques in astrophotography available today. Each chapter focuses on a particular technique, but the book as a whole covers all types of astronomical image processing, including processing of events such as eclipses, using DSLRs, and deep-sky, planetary, widefield, and high resolution astronomical image processing. Recognized contributors include deep-sky experts such as Jay GaBany, Tony Hallas, and Ken Crawford, high-resolution planetary expert Damian Peach, and the founder of TWAN (The World at Night) Babak A. Tafreshi.

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An excerpt:

Today, more than it was however many years ago, art is hard because you have to keep after it so consistently. On so many different fronts. For so little external reward. Artists become veteran artists only by making peace not just with themselves, but with a huge range of issues. You have to find your work...

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