Making Noises

OverDog Press
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If you’ve ever dreamed of making it in music, then "Making Noises" is your novel.

“Euan Mitchell, author of the independent bestseller 'Feral Tracks', knows his rock’n’roll … and this laid-back, ironic take on the Australian music industry in the ’90s captures the spirit of the time. It’s fast-paced and grungy, full of backroom intrigue and colourful characters.”
The Age

“Loved it. I felt I knew almost all the seedy, manipulative, gold-digging music biz characters – but fortunately only on a two-faced, air-kiss kind of basis … Funny, astute, honest.”
Rob Hirst, Midnight Oil

“In the same way that 'Spinal Tap' is not a fiction, neither is 'Making Noises'. The stuff in both stories really does happen.”
John Archer, Hunters & Collectors

“Euan Mitchell does a nice line in laid-back prose.”
Sydney Morning Herald

*****

Marty is a rock musician on the wrong side of thirty who needs to change his tastes in music, women and cities. Billy is fifteen, talented and in prison.

The two are thrown together by the fast-talking former politician, Perce "Perk" Harrigan, whose powerful friends have handed him the plum job of launching the Oz Rock Foundation. Oz Rock uses taxpayer dollars to promote hip bands and quietly lift the Prime Minister’s youth vote.

Harrigan and his sultry but fascist assistant, Ingrid, need to ‘spin’ Oz Rock into orbit despite the cynics. They enlist Marty’s help to manipulate Billy to the top of the music charts. But their greatest enemy may not be the one publicly calling for Harrigan’s head.

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About the author

Euan Mitchell’s first novel, Feral Tracks, was an independent bestseller, which was critically acclaimed and optioned for a feature film. Euan played in rock bands for a number of years after completing his arts degree in the 1980s. He worked as a writer and commissioning editor for Ausmusic from 1993 to 1997, then as a senior editor for Reed Publishing. Since 2001 he has worked as a teacher in universities and technical colleges, while writing a few books on the side. Although married with three children, Euan is still recovering from punk. Making Noises is his second novel.

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Additional Information

Publisher
OverDog Press
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Published on
Jun 8, 2015
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Pages
358
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ISBN
9780975797976
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Humorous
Fiction / Satire
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Available on Android devices
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