Love-songs of Childhood

Ayer Company Pub

Father calls me William, sister calls me Will, Mother calls me Willie, but the fellers call me Bill! Mighty glad I ain't a girl - ruther be a boy, Without them sashes, curls, an' things that's worn by Fauntleroy! Love to chawnk green apples an' go swimmin' in the lake.
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About the author

Eugene Field was born in Saint Louis, Missouri , September 2, 1850 . He's an American writer, best known for poetry for children and for humorous essays. After the death of his mother he was raised by a cousin in Amherst, Massachusetts. Field briefly attended various colleges in Massachusetts and Missouri. He tried acting and studying law. He then set off for a trip through Europe only to return to the U.S. six months later penniless. Field then worked as a journalist for the Gazette in Saint Joseph, Missouri in 1875. The same year he married Julia Comstock. The couple had 8 children. Field soon rose to become city editor of the Gazette. From 1876 through 1880 Field lived in Saint Louis, where he was an editorial writer. He then took a job as managing editor of the Kansas City, Missouri Times, then from 1881 began two years as managing editor of the Tribune of Denver, Colorado. In 1883 he moved to Chicago, Illinois where he wrote a humorous newspaper column called Sharps & Flats for the Chicago Daily News. Field first started publishing poetry in 1879, when his book Christian Treasures appeared. Over a dozen more volumes followed, and he became well known for his light-hearted poems for children; perhaps the best known is "Wynken, Blynken, and Nod". Several of his poems were set to music with commercial success. Eugene Field died in Chicago at the age of 45. His former home in Saint Louis is now a museum. A memorial to him, a statue of the "Dream Lady" from his poem, "Rock-a-by-Lady" was erected in 1922 at the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Ayer Company Pub
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Published on
Dec 31, 1897
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Pages
111
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Poetry / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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The Works of Eugene Field is a collection of poetry and essays by American author Eugene Field, originally published by Charles Scribner's Sons in 1896 under the title The Writings in Prose and Verse of Eugene Field. Known for his children's poetry, especially the light-hearted "Wynken, Blynken, and Nod," Field was a journalist who found his niche in poetry and humor writing. The original collection, published after Field's death and including artwork and letters from the author, is a charming set of books compiling all his works. Republished here for young readers and collectors of Americana, The Works of Eugene Field is sure to delight audiences young and old. Volume V of this twelve-volume set, The Holy Cross and Other Tales, is a collection of short stories, including "The Holy Cross." Five tales were added after it was originally issued, meant to demonstrate some of Field's best work from his later years. It also includes an Introduction from American poet and essayist Edmund Clarence Stedman. EUGENE FIELD (1850-1895) was an American author known for his humorous essays and children's poetry. Interested in many subjects and unable to decide what to do with his life, Field attended three colleges-Williams College, Knox College, and University of Missouri-tried his hand at acting, law, and journalism, and traveled Europe before meeting his wife and becoming city editor for the St. Joseph Gazette in St. Joseph, Missouri. He wrote and edited for several newspapers, establishing himself as a humor writer and publishing poetry. He died of a heart-attack at 45.
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