ZARA. A European fashion brand

GRIN Verlag
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Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject Business economics - Marketing, Corporate Communication, CRM, Market Research, Social Media, grade: sehr gut, University of East London, 11 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: “Galician Beauty: Spanish clothier Zara beats the competition at efficiency – and just about everything else” The Wallstreet Journal, May 18, 2001. During the years 2000-2001, Inditex, an international fashion manufacture and distribution group, received widespread favourable press, touting Inditex’s success and attributing it to Zara’s unique integrated business model (Freimen, 2002). In this case study we want to analyse this phenomenon called Zara, a strategic unit of the Inditex Group, and evaluate the strategies of Zara on the European fashion market.
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Additional Information

Publisher
GRIN Verlag
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Published on
Jan 4, 2005
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Pages
15
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ISBN
9783638335485
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Advertising & Promotion
Business & Economics / Marketing / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject Business economics - Business Management, Corporate Governance, grade: Good, University of East London, 37 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: The Cultural Wall “Recently a large global company set up a sophisticated website for employees in international subsidiaries to share knowledge. It had areas for chat, document storage, and messages from the company’s leadership. Everything was clearly segmented so information could be looked up in many different ways. The designers expected people to load many documents onto the site. But even it was interesting, easy to use, and had many features, hardly anyone visited the website. Potential users said that they liked it, but just did not have time for it. The designers felt that they hit the ‘cultural wall’.” 1.1 The Influence of National Culture on Knowledge Management Today, most organisations are aware that managing their knowledge effectively is the only way to achieve sustainable competitive advantage (Drucker, 2001). Companies not securing systematically knowledge for later usage, risk to reinvent solutions and to incur unnecessary expense to relearn the same lessons (Tiwana, 1999). But in an increasingly global business context, companies not only need to understand the importance of knowledge management but also the importance of (national) cultural differences which influence knowledge management processes. Recognising cultural differences is an important step to anticipating potential threats as well as opportunities. [...]
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Essay from the year 2004 in the subject Business economics - Personnel and Organisation, grade: Good, University of East London, 14 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: The role of work and the workplace have changed throughout the world due to economic conditions and social demands. Global competition, renewed interest in personal lives and family values and an ageing workforce are factors which contribute to the serious consideration of equilibrium between work and life (Lockwood, 2003). The challenge of work-life balance is rising to the top of many employees’ and employers’ consciousness. Employees are placing more value on quality of working life and seeking for greater flexibility so that they can manage work commitments along personal life. Employers, on the contrary, need in today’s economic climate a workforce that is stable and committed but also more adaptable and flexible to meet business challenges. Finding the right balance between work responsibilities and the demands on personal lives is conclusively becoming a significant issue (Loghran, 2002). Therefore, at the core of human resource strategy lays the need to consider work-life balance for employees. One of the vehicles to help provide attainment of personal and professional goals are work-life programmes. But why should organisations follow this work-life trend? Is it a critical business issue or simply the “right thing to do”? Which potential business improvement does work-life programmes offer to organisations? The aim of this report is to analyse the benefits for employers when implementing work-life balance programmes. Therefore, the concept of work-life balance will be defined and the potential business benefits will be analysed. Based on this analysis, this report will show that organisations can gain a competitive advantage when offering work-life initiatives.
Master's Thesis from the year 2004 in the subject Business economics - Business Management, Corporate Governance, grade: very good, University of East London, 96 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Most organisations are aware that in today’s highly competitive environment managing effectively their knowledge is the only way to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage. One of the primary areas to which knowledge management can be applied is the field of project management. An increasing number of business sectors are adopting a project approach to carry out a range of essential activities where valuable knowledge is gained. Knowledge from projects is an important resource for further projects, because projects solve innovative and interdisciplinary tasks. However, the majority of organisations do not manage the information gained through past projects. Failure to transfer knowledge from past to future projects leads to wasted activity and unnecessary expenses by ‘reinventing the wheel’. Therefore, knowledge management is a critical success factor for many projects. The purpose of this Management Report is to approach knowledge management from the perspective of project management. The main objective is to define how knowledge management can be enhanced within a project by analysing suitable tools and relevant theories. The research is based on the high-speed train project XY of the company XXX. This project is an important milestone for XXX to improve its market position in Spain. The knowledge gained through the XY project will be the key factor for the success of the further high-speed train projects. The main finding of the case study highlights that there is a lack of formal knowledge management activities at the project. The project team focuses mainly on personal interaction for transferring knowledge and information technology is not used to its full potential. A hybrid approach to knowledge management for project environments is suggested, taking into account technical as well as human-specific aspects. The main recommendation is to determine a knowledge management strategy, which preferably focuses on transferring tacit knowledge and gives information technology a support function. Other areas of improvement are creating an open and constructive project culture, including knowledge initiatives in reward systems and fostering documented project review sessions. Finally, general conclusions are provided to answer the main research question of this management report.
Essay from the year 2004 in the subject Business economics - Personnel and Organisation, grade: Good, University of East London, 14 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: The role of work and the workplace have changed throughout the world due to economic conditions and social demands. Global competition, renewed interest in personal lives and family values and an ageing workforce are factors which contribute to the serious consideration of equilibrium between work and life (Lockwood, 2003). The challenge of work-life balance is rising to the top of many employees’ and employers’ consciousness. Employees are placing more value on quality of working life and seeking for greater flexibility so that they can manage work commitments along personal life. Employers, on the contrary, need in today’s economic climate a workforce that is stable and committed but also more adaptable and flexible to meet business challenges. Finding the right balance between work responsibilities and the demands on personal lives is conclusively becoming a significant issue (Loghran, 2002). Therefore, at the core of human resource strategy lays the need to consider work-life balance for employees. One of the vehicles to help provide attainment of personal and professional goals are work-life programmes. But why should organisations follow this work-life trend? Is it a critical business issue or simply the “right thing to do”? Which potential business improvement does work-life programmes offer to organisations? The aim of this report is to analyse the benefits for employers when implementing work-life balance programmes. Therefore, the concept of work-life balance will be defined and the potential business benefits will be analysed. Based on this analysis, this report will show that organisations can gain a competitive advantage when offering work-life initiatives.
Research Paper (undergraduate) from the year 2003 in the subject Business economics - Business Management, Corporate Governance, grade: very good (distinction), European College of Business and Management (ECBM) London, 8 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Ten years after the disaster of the Agean Sea, the Galician coast is once again threatened by an oil spill. Ten years, during which no effective measures had been put in place to prevent such disasters. “Prestige”, a 26 year old single hull oil tanker carrying 77,000 metrics tons of heavy fuel oil, began to break up in mid-November 2002 near the coast of Spain’s autonomous community of Galicia and towed out to sea, finally sinking 19th November at Cap Finisterre. This place marks the extreme western point of the Iberian Peninsula, where the Prestige has created an oil slick along the coastline of Galicia, and caused one of the major economic and environmental disasters. Fishing is the source of livelihood for an estimated quarter million families in Galicia. In addition to contaminating of the Galician coastline, Europe’s richest in fish and shellfish, the oil has spread to Spain’s northern coasts of the autonomous communities of Asturias, Cantabria and Basque Country, the French and Portuguese coasts. The “Costa da Morte” is the name given to this coastline, which has seen many shipping accidents over years. Many people from all over the world are cleaning voluntarily the Galician coasts affected by the spill. They have been duped “the white tide” for the protective uniforms they wear and for their work in defence of the environment.1 Since it began spewing toxic fuel oil during a storm off the Galician coast on November 13th, the Prestige has been a major political headache for the Spanish government. The opposition Socialist party and local media have questioned Prime Ministers José María Aznar’s decision to send the tanker back out to the stormy Atlantic, rather than allow it into a harbour where spilling oil could be contained before the tanker broke up. Deputy Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy is responsible for the coordination of the government’s crisis team to handle the oil spill. The nature conservation department of the Galician regional department, Xunta, is working systematically towards gearing its activities to manage this crisis. Now the oil slick is threatening the “Costa lucense” (also called “Rias Altas”) will arrive in the near future at two beaches on the northern Galician coast, next to the town Viveiro. [...]
Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject Business economics - Business Management, Corporate Governance, grade: Good, University of East London, 37 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: The Cultural Wall “Recently a large global company set up a sophisticated website for employees in international subsidiaries to share knowledge. It had areas for chat, document storage, and messages from the company’s leadership. Everything was clearly segmented so information could be looked up in many different ways. The designers expected people to load many documents onto the site. But even it was interesting, easy to use, and had many features, hardly anyone visited the website. Potential users said that they liked it, but just did not have time for it. The designers felt that they hit the ‘cultural wall’.” 1.1 The Influence of National Culture on Knowledge Management Today, most organisations are aware that managing their knowledge effectively is the only way to achieve sustainable competitive advantage (Drucker, 2001). Companies not securing systematically knowledge for later usage, risk to reinvent solutions and to incur unnecessary expense to relearn the same lessons (Tiwana, 1999). But in an increasingly global business context, companies not only need to understand the importance of knowledge management but also the importance of (national) cultural differences which influence knowledge management processes. Recognising cultural differences is an important step to anticipating potential threats as well as opportunities. [...]
Master's Thesis from the year 2003 in the subject Business economics - Personnel and Organisation, grade: good, University of East London (European College of Business and Management), 32 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In today’s economy, companies are increasingly facing new challenges. High competition in a global market, shrinking corporate resources, rapid shifts in technology, and the recruitment and retention of talented and skilled people are just few of these challenges. The economy demands that people’s knowledge and skill levels be constantly updated. A growing number of companies are developing a new learning culture. In the past companies have viewed training as a necessary expense rather than an investment. Emphasis was placed cutting on the expense of training by making it more efficient. Now, in response of these challenges, companies are beginning to view training as an investment. The knowledge and skills of the organisation’s employees are now being held on equal basis with the company’s monetary asset. Learning faster than other companies represents one of the most important competitive advantages.1 Here the Internet technology represents an unprecedented opportunity for training departments to add value to the organization. E-learning combines education, information, communication, training and knowledge management.2 It represents an all embracing and cost effective way of training staff. It can deliver on a global basis, while tailoring content to suit the needs of the individuals. It also allows an organization to regularly assess skills gaps. Its benefits have already been realised by a number of the world’s leading companies who prepare their workforce with elearning. Some case studies will be described in this report.
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