Rapid Visual Screening of Buildings for Potential Seismic Hazards: A Handbook

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Publisher
FEMA
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Published on
Dec 31, 1988
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Pages
137
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Best For
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Language
English
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This content is DRM free.
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Preparedness takes action! Learn more about hazards which can affect your community and ways you can take action to prepare and participate: Earthquakes can occur suddenly and be deadly. Most earthquake-related casualties result from collapsing walls, flying glass, and falling objects. Flooding is the most common natural disaster in the United States and can happen anywhere. Hurricanes have the power to cause widespread devastation, and can affect both coastal and inland areas. Tornadoes are one of nature’s most violent storms, and can cause death, injury, and destruction within seconds. Wildfires can occur anywhere and can destroy homes, businesses, infrastructure, natural resources, and agriculture. Winter storms can occur anywhere and bring freezing rain, ice, snow, high winds or a combination of all these conditions. They can cause power outages that last for days or weeks; making it hard to keep warm and making travel very dangerous. Recent national tragedies remind us that the risk is real: an active shooter incident can happen in any place at any time. The best way to make sure you and your loved ones stay safe is to prepare ahead of time. Content: How to Prepare for an Earthquake How to Prepare for a Flood How to Prepare for a Hurricane How to Prepare for a Tornado How to Prepare for a Wildfire How to Prepare for a Winter Storm How to Provide Emergency Medical Help: First Aid Case and Kits Emergency Rescue and Transportation Procedures First Aid Handbook in Case of Injury: Specific Injuries Fractures Climatic Injuries
This report, FEMA-351 – Recommended Seismic Evaluation and Upgrade Criteria for Existing Welded Steel Moment-Frame Buildings has been developed by the SAC Joint Venture under contract to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide structural engineers with recommended criteria for evaluation of the probable performance of existing steel moment-frame buildings in future earthquakes and to provide a basis for updating and revision of evaluation and rehabilitation guidelines and standards. It is one of a series of companion publications addressing the issue of the seismic performance of steel moment-frame buildings. The set of companion publications includes: FEMA-350 – Recommended Seismic Design Criteria for New Steel Moment-Frame Buildings. This publication provides recommended criteria, supplemental to FEMA-302 – 1997 NEHRP Recommended Provisions for Seismic Regulations for New Buildings and Other Structures, for the design and construction of steel moment-frame buildings and provides alternative performance-based design criteria. FEMA-351 – Recommended Seismic Evaluation and Upgrade Criteria for Existing Welded Steel Moment-Frame Buildings. This publication provides recommended methods to evaluate the probable performance of existing steel moment-frame buildings in future earthquakes and to retrofit these buildings for improved performance. FEMA-352 – Recommended Postearthquake Evaluation and Repair Criteria for Welded Steel Moment-Frame Buildings. This publication provides recommendations for performing postearthquake inspections to detect damage in steel moment-frame buildings following an earthquake, evaluating the damaged buildings to determine their safety in the postearthquake environment, and repairing damaged buildings. FEMA-353 – Recommended Specifications and Quality Assurance Guidelines for Steel Moment-Frame Construction for Seismic Applications. This publication provides recommended specifications for the fabrication and erection of steel moment frames for seismic applications. The recommended design criteria contained in the other companion documents are based on the material and workmanship standards contained in this document, which also includes discussion of the basis for the quality control and quality assurance criteria contained in the recommended specifications. The information contained in these recommended evaluation and upgrade criteria, hereinafter referred to as Recommended Criteria, is presented in the form of specific recommendations for design and performance evaluation procedures together with supporting commentary explaining part of the basis for these recommendations.

NOTE: NO FURTHER DISCOUNT FORTHIS PRINT PRODUCT--OVERSTOCK SALE --Significantly reduced list price

This guide provides information on current best practices for earthquake-resistant house design and construction for use by builders, designers, code enforcement personnel, and potential homeowners. It incorporates lessons learned from the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1994 Northridge earthquakes as well as knowledge gained from the FEMA-funded CUREE-Caltech Woodframe Project. It also introduces and explains the effects of earthquake loads on one- and two-family detached houses and identifies the requirements of the 2003 International Residential Code (IRC) intended to resist these loads.

A typical model house is used to illustrate the concepts discussed and to identify approximate deflections under earthquake loading, which permits performance to be compared for various building configurations using the minimum code requirements and the above-code techniques. The above-code recommendations are based on an analysis of the model house as well as comparative tests performed by various researchers and the lessons learned from investigation of residential building performance in past earthquakes. A nonlinear time-history analysis was performed for the model building using the SAWS computer program developed as part of the CUREE-Caltech Woodframe Project (Folz and Filiatrault, 2002). Details of the analysis are presented in Appendix A.

Related products:

Rapid Visual Screening of Buildings for Potential Seismic Hazards: A Hanbook is available here: https://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/064-000-00060-8

Rapid Visual Screening of Buildings for Potential Seismic Hazards: Supporting Documentation is available here: https://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/064-000-00061-6

Taking Shelter From the Storm: Building a Safe Room for Your Home or Small Business; Includes Construction Plans (CD) can be found here:https://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/064-000-00069-1

The Seismic Rehabilitation of Historic Buildings is available here: https://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/024-005-01322-9






Additional appendices feature checklists for builders, designers, and plan checkers; explain significant differences between the 2003 and 2006 editions of the IRC; and present a list of reference materials.


NOTE: NO FURTHER DISCOUNT FORTHIS PRINT PRODUCT--OVERSTOCK SALE --Significantly reduced list price

This guide provides information on current best practices for earthquake-resistant house design and construction for use by builders, designers, code enforcement personnel, and potential homeowners. It incorporates lessons learned from the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1994 Northridge earthquakes as well as knowledge gained from the FEMA-funded CUREE-Caltech Woodframe Project. It also introduces and explains the effects of earthquake loads on one- and two-family detached houses and identifies the requirements of the 2003 International Residential Code (IRC) intended to resist these loads.

A typical model house is used to illustrate the concepts discussed and to identify approximate deflections under earthquake loading, which permits performance to be compared for various building configurations using the minimum code requirements and the above-code techniques. The above-code recommendations are based on an analysis of the model house as well as comparative tests performed by various researchers and the lessons learned from investigation of residential building performance in past earthquakes. A nonlinear time-history analysis was performed for the model building using the SAWS computer program developed as part of the CUREE-Caltech Woodframe Project (Folz and Filiatrault, 2002). Details of the analysis are presented in Appendix A.

Related products:

Rapid Visual Screening of Buildings for Potential Seismic Hazards: A Hanbook is available here: https://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/064-000-00060-8

Rapid Visual Screening of Buildings for Potential Seismic Hazards: Supporting Documentation is available here: https://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/064-000-00061-6

Taking Shelter From the Storm: Building a Safe Room for Your Home or Small Business; Includes Construction Plans (CD) can be found here:https://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/064-000-00069-1

The Seismic Rehabilitation of Historic Buildings is available here: https://bookstore.gpo.gov/products/sku/024-005-01322-9






Additional appendices feature checklists for builders, designers, and plan checkers; explain significant differences between the 2003 and 2006 editions of the IRC; and present a list of reference materials.

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