An investigation of the impact of Basel II on the improvement in risk management practice globally

GRIN Verlag
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Essay from the year 2006 in the subject Business economics - Banking, Stock Exchanges, Insurance, Accounting, grade: A, University of Westminster (Westminster Business School), course: International Risk Management, 19 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: The new Basel Accord will be introduced in 2007, this publication examines in how far the new package of regulations will benefit risk management globally. After evaluating contradictory points of view of several internationally active groups, the author comes to the conclusion that even though the final impact cannot yet be observed Basel II is likely to improve the current situation of risk management in the market.
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Publisher
GRIN Verlag
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Published on
Mar 28, 2006
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Pages
16
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ISBN
9783638484046
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Banks & Banking
Business & Economics / Industries / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Arthur Herman
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • SELECTED BY THE ECONOMIST AS ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR

Remarkable as it may seem today, there once was a time when the president of the United States could pick up the phone and ask the president of General Motors to resign his position and take the reins of a great national enterprise. And the CEO would oblige, no questions asked, because it was his patriotic duty.
 
In Freedom’s Forge, bestselling author Arthur Herman takes us back to that time, revealing how two extraordinary American businessmen—automobile magnate William Knudsen and shipbuilder Henry J. Kaiser—helped corral, cajole, and inspire business leaders across the country to mobilize the “arsenal of democracy” that propelled the Allies to victory in World War II.
 
“Knudsen? I want to see you in Washington. I want you to work on some production matters.” With those words, President Franklin D. Roosevelt enlisted “Big Bill” Knudsen, a Danish immigrant who had risen through the ranks of the auto industry to become president of General Motors, to drop his plans for market domination and join the U.S. Army. Commissioned a lieutenant general, Knudsen assembled a crack team of industrial innovators, persuading them one by one to leave their lucrative private sector positions and join him in Washington, D.C. Dubbed the “dollar-a-year men,” these dedicated patriots quickly took charge of America’s moribund war production effort.
 
Henry J. Kaiser was a maverick California industrialist famed for his innovative business techniques and his can-do management style. He, too, joined the cause. His Liberty ships became World War II icons—and the Kaiser name became so admired that FDR briefly considered making him his vice president in 1944. Together, Knudsen and Kaiser created a wartime production behemoth. Drafting top talent from companies like Chrysler, Republic Steel, Boeing, Lockheed, GE, and Frigidaire, they turned auto plants into aircraft factories and civilian assembly lines into fountains of munitions, giving Americans fighting in Europe and Asia the tools they needed to defeat the Axis. In four short years they transformed America’s army from a hollow shell into a truly global force, laying the foundations for a new industrial America—and for the country’s rise as an economic as well as military superpower.
 
Featuring behind-the-scenes portraits of FDR, George Marshall, Henry Stimson, Harry Hopkins, Jimmy Doolittle, and Curtis LeMay, as well as scores of largely forgotten heroes and heroines of the wartime industrial effort, Freedom’s Forge is the American story writ large. It vividly re-creates American industry’s finest hour, when the nation’s business elites put aside their pursuit of profits and set about saving the world.

Praise for Freedom’s Forge
 
“A rambunctious book that is itself alive with the animal spirits of the marketplace.”—The Wall Street Journal
 
“A rarely told industrial saga, rich with particulars of the growing pains and eventual triumphs of American industry . . . Arthur Herman has set out to right an injustice: the loss, down history’s memory hole, of the epic achievements of American business in helping the United States and its allies win World War II.”—The New York Times Book Review
 
“Magnificent . . . It’s not often that a historian comes up with a fresh approach to an absolutely critical element of the Allied victory in World War II, but Pulitzer finalist Herman . . . has done just that.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)


From the Hardcover edition.
Frédérik Arns
Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject Economics - Innovation economics, grade: B, University of Groningen, course: Strategy and Innovation, 20 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In the contemporary business world nobody survives alone. An organization that wants to succeed must follow the rapidly changing environment. Major requirements for successful activity on the market are openness to innovations and the ability to enter into an alliance with other organizations and even competitors. “Strategic” or “corporate” alliances formed at high levels often fail to deliver real benefits to the partners. Analysts and managers will argue eternally over what caused each link-up to fail. Some blame egos and clashing cultures; others cite business conflicts and ruthless competition. Yet these cases of unfulfilled promises typically share one syndrome: the creation of the big alliance came to be seen as an end in itself rather than a means to a broader strategic goal (Gomes-Casseres, 1998). Therefore, an alliance without a comprehensive strategy behind it has a large probability of failure. Moreover, not all strategies lead to success. This research involves exploring strategic alliances in the computer hardware sector, the most innovative sector of the economy. Using the example of IBM, I aim to show that a strategic alliance can be successful if it is driven by innovation. In other words, two companies that form an alliance for the purpose of development and advancement of a new product or technology are likely to be successful. Admittedly, the presence of the innovation factor may not necessarily be the main reason for the success of the strategic alliance. Nevertheless, alliances based on joint innovation development are more lasting and productive than those that are not. I also hope to show how innovations help companies determine a strategy for their alliance. The following section presents a literature review on the strategic alliance, its purpose, and its expectations. The subsequent two sections present the research questions and model the problem, using the EFQM Excellence Model to estimate the success of the strategic alliance in achieving its purpose. The last two sections discuss the methods and data necessary for this study, and then present the conclusion.
Andrew Ross Sorkin
Named a Best Book of the Year by: The Economist, The Financial Times, Business Week, and 800-CEO-Read

Winner of the Gerald Loeb Award for Best Business Book

“Too Big To Fail is too good to put down. . . . It is the story of the actors in the most extraordinary financial spectacle in 80 years, and it is told brilliantly.” —The Economist 

“Vigorously reported, superbly organized . . . For those of us who didn’t pursue MBAs—and have the penny-ante salaries to prove it—Sorkin’s book offers a clear, cogent explanation of what happened and why it matters.” —Julia Keller, Chicago Tribune

“Sorkin’s prodigious reporting and lively writing put the reader in the room for some of the biggest-dollar conference calls in history. It’s an entertaining, brisk book.” —Paul M. Barrett, The New York Times Book Review 

“Sorkin’s densely detailed and astonishing narrative of the epic financial crisis of 2008 is an extraordinary achievement that will be hard to surpass as the definitive account.” —John Gapper, Financial Times 

A brilliantly reported true-life thriller that goes behind the scenes of the financial crisis on Wall Street and in Washington, the basis for the HBO film 

In one of the most gripping financial narratives in decades, Andrew Ross Sorkin-a New York Times columnist and one of the country's most respected financial reporters-delivers the first definitive blow- by-blow account of the epochal economic crisis that brought the world to the brink. Through unprecedented access to the players involved, he re-creates all the drama and turmoil of these turbulent days, revealing never-before-disclosed details and recounting how, motivated as often by ego and greed as by fear and self-preservation, the most powerful men and women in finance and politics decided the fate of the world's economy.
Frédérik Arns
Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject Economics - Innovation economics, grade: B, University of Groningen, course: Strategy and Innovation, 20 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In the contemporary business world nobody survives alone. An organization that wants to succeed must follow the rapidly changing environment. Major requirements for successful activity on the market are openness to innovations and the ability to enter into an alliance with other organizations and even competitors. “Strategic” or “corporate” alliances formed at high levels often fail to deliver real benefits to the partners. Analysts and managers will argue eternally over what caused each link-up to fail. Some blame egos and clashing cultures; others cite business conflicts and ruthless competition. Yet these cases of unfulfilled promises typically share one syndrome: the creation of the big alliance came to be seen as an end in itself rather than a means to a broader strategic goal (Gomes-Casseres, 1998). Therefore, an alliance without a comprehensive strategy behind it has a large probability of failure. Moreover, not all strategies lead to success. This research involves exploring strategic alliances in the computer hardware sector, the most innovative sector of the economy. Using the example of IBM, I aim to show that a strategic alliance can be successful if it is driven by innovation. In other words, two companies that form an alliance for the purpose of development and advancement of a new product or technology are likely to be successful. Admittedly, the presence of the innovation factor may not necessarily be the main reason for the success of the strategic alliance. Nevertheless, alliances based on joint innovation development are more lasting and productive than those that are not. I also hope to show how innovations help companies determine a strategy for their alliance. The following section presents a literature review on the strategic alliance, its purpose, and its expectations. The subsequent two sections present the research questions and model the problem, using the EFQM Excellence Model to estimate the success of the strategic alliance in achieving its purpose. The last two sections discuss the methods and data necessary for this study, and then present the conclusion.
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