An investigation of the impact of Basel II on the improvement in risk management practice globally

GRIN Verlag
Free sample

Essay from the year 2006 in the subject Business economics - Banking, Stock Exchanges, Insurance, Accounting, grade: A, University of Westminster (Westminster Business School), course: International Risk Management, 19 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: The new Basel Accord will be introduced in 2007, this publication examines in how far the new package of regulations will benefit risk management globally. After evaluating contradictory points of view of several internationally active groups, the author comes to the conclusion that even though the final impact cannot yet be observed Basel II is likely to improve the current situation of risk management in the market.
Read more
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
GRIN Verlag
Read more
Published on
Mar 28, 2006
Read more
Pages
16
Read more
ISBN
9783638484046
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Business & Economics / Banks & Banking
Business & Economics / Industries / General
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject Economics - Innovation economics, grade: B, University of Groningen, course: Strategy and Innovation, 20 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In the contemporary business world nobody survives alone. An organization that wants to succeed must follow the rapidly changing environment. Major requirements for successful activity on the market are openness to innovations and the ability to enter into an alliance with other organizations and even competitors. “Strategic” or “corporate” alliances formed at high levels often fail to deliver real benefits to the partners. Analysts and managers will argue eternally over what caused each link-up to fail. Some blame egos and clashing cultures; others cite business conflicts and ruthless competition. Yet these cases of unfulfilled promises typically share one syndrome: the creation of the big alliance came to be seen as an end in itself rather than a means to a broader strategic goal (Gomes-Casseres, 1998). Therefore, an alliance without a comprehensive strategy behind it has a large probability of failure. Moreover, not all strategies lead to success. This research involves exploring strategic alliances in the computer hardware sector, the most innovative sector of the economy. Using the example of IBM, I aim to show that a strategic alliance can be successful if it is driven by innovation. In other words, two companies that form an alliance for the purpose of development and advancement of a new product or technology are likely to be successful. Admittedly, the presence of the innovation factor may not necessarily be the main reason for the success of the strategic alliance. Nevertheless, alliances based on joint innovation development are more lasting and productive than those that are not. I also hope to show how innovations help companies determine a strategy for their alliance. The following section presents a literature review on the strategic alliance, its purpose, and its expectations. The subsequent two sections present the research questions and model the problem, using the EFQM Excellence Model to estimate the success of the strategic alliance in achieving its purpose. The last two sections discuss the methods and data necessary for this study, and then present the conclusion.
Charles Wheelan’s wonderfully whimsical, best-selling Naked series tackles the weird, surprisingly colorful world of money and banking.

Consider the $20 bill.

It has no more value, as a simple slip of paper, than Monopoly money. Yet even children recognize that tearing one into small pieces is an act of inconceivable stupidity. What makes a $20 bill actually worth twenty dollars? In the third volume of his best-selling Naked series, Charles Wheelan uses this seemingly simple question to open the door to the surprisingly colorful world of money and banking.

The search for an answer triggers countless other questions along the way: Why does paper money (“fiat currency” if you want to be fancy) even exist? And why do some nations, like Zimbabwe in the 1990s, print so much of it that it becomes more valuable as toilet paper than as currency? How do central banks use the power of money creation to stop financial crises? Why does most of Europe share a common currency, and why has that arrangement caused so much trouble? And will payment apps, bitcoin, or other new technologies render all of this moot?

In Naked Money, Wheelan tackles all of the above and more, showing us how our banking and monetary systems should work in ideal situations and revealing the havoc and suffering caused in real situations by inflation, deflation, illiquidity, and other monetary effects. Throughout, Wheelan’s uniquely bright-eyed, whimsical style brings levity and clarity to a subject often devoid of both. With illuminating stories from Argentina, Zimbabwe, North Korea, America, China, and elsewhere around the globe, Wheelan demystifies the curious world behind the paper in our wallets and the digits in our bank accounts.

Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject Economics - Innovation economics, grade: B, University of Groningen, course: Strategy and Innovation, 20 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In the contemporary business world nobody survives alone. An organization that wants to succeed must follow the rapidly changing environment. Major requirements for successful activity on the market are openness to innovations and the ability to enter into an alliance with other organizations and even competitors. “Strategic” or “corporate” alliances formed at high levels often fail to deliver real benefits to the partners. Analysts and managers will argue eternally over what caused each link-up to fail. Some blame egos and clashing cultures; others cite business conflicts and ruthless competition. Yet these cases of unfulfilled promises typically share one syndrome: the creation of the big alliance came to be seen as an end in itself rather than a means to a broader strategic goal (Gomes-Casseres, 1998). Therefore, an alliance without a comprehensive strategy behind it has a large probability of failure. Moreover, not all strategies lead to success. This research involves exploring strategic alliances in the computer hardware sector, the most innovative sector of the economy. Using the example of IBM, I aim to show that a strategic alliance can be successful if it is driven by innovation. In other words, two companies that form an alliance for the purpose of development and advancement of a new product or technology are likely to be successful. Admittedly, the presence of the innovation factor may not necessarily be the main reason for the success of the strategic alliance. Nevertheless, alliances based on joint innovation development are more lasting and productive than those that are not. I also hope to show how innovations help companies determine a strategy for their alliance. The following section presents a literature review on the strategic alliance, its purpose, and its expectations. The subsequent two sections present the research questions and model the problem, using the EFQM Excellence Model to estimate the success of the strategic alliance in achieving its purpose. The last two sections discuss the methods and data necessary for this study, and then present the conclusion.
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.