The Population of Mexico: Trends, Issues, and Policies

Transaction Publishers
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Providing a concise, comprehensive overview of Mexico's population, its history, current demographic features, and future growth potential, Alba establishes the bases of Mexico's ongoing population boom, placing it in its social context. He also considers repercussions of past and present demographic trends and evaluates current population policies as set by the Mexican government. Presented in a readily accessible format and highlighted by a generous number of tables and charts available to an English-speaking audience for the first time, Alba's critical data on contributory demographic phenomena—a sustained high-fertility rate, steadily declining mortality rate, migratory movements, urbanization, and economically active population segments—illuminate the basic trends of Mexico's population since the 1910 Revolution.

Alba offers the first authoritative account of the population of Mexico, a country that has experienced not only a population explosion, but a simultaneous urban explosion. Combining demographic data with an analysis of future trends in the economy, culture, and social health of Mexican society, The Population of Mexico is not only a landmark achievement in its own right, but also a model for how population explosions will affect the general development of the Third World.

Alba believes that family planning as a tool of demographic policy may not have the expected societal results. Its choice is due to reluctance to define population policies and set target levels and rates for demographic variables. Attainment of a demographic objective does not necessarily mean that the only or even the most appropriate tools are demographic. Entry by increasing numbers of women into the work force and participation of all population sectors in the benefits, options, and accomplishments of development can be more effective in reducing birth rates than any measures of inducement or coercion. Family planning should be incorporated into other economic and social programs.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Transaction Publishers
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Published on
Dec 31, 1982
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Pages
127
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ISBN
9781412838450
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Latin America / General
Social Science / Demography
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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