Ukiyo-e: The Art of the Japanese Print

Tuttle Publishing
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The art of Japanese woodblock printing, known as ukiyo-e ("pictures of the floating world"), reflects the rich history and way of life in Japan hundreds of years ago. Ukiyo-e: The Art of the Japanese Print takes a thematic approach to this iconic Japanese art form, considering prints by subject matter: geisha and courtesans, kabuki actors, sumo wrestlers, erotica, nature, historical subjects and even images of foreigners in Japan.

An artist himself, author Frederick Harris—a well-known American collector who lived in Japan for 50 years—pays special attention to the methods and materials employed in Japanese printmaking. The book traces the evolution of ukiyo-e from its origins in metropolitan Edo (Tokyo) art culture as black and white illustrations, to delicate two-color prints and multicolored designs. Advice to admirers on how to collect, care for, view and buy Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints rounds out this book of charming, carefully selected prints.
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About the author

Frederick Harris is an artist who lived in Japan for over fifty years. He was introduced to the Japanese woodblock print by the well-known printmaker Martin Lewis, and after serving in the armed forces in Korea, he moved to Japan to establish an art studio.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Tuttle Publishing
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Published on
May 29, 2012
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9781462906147
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / Asian / Japanese
Art / History / Ancient & Classical
Art / Prints
Art / Techniques / Printmaking
History / Asia / Japan
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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