The Doctrine of State and the Principles of State Law

WordBridge Publishing
Free sample

Friedrich Julius Stahl was one of Germany's leading constitutional scholars in the 19th century, prior to the advent of Bismarck and the establishment of a united Germany. The Doctrine of State and the Principles of State Law is the centerpiece of his magnum opus, the Philosophy of Law. This is the first English-language translation of this key work of legal and political philosophy. It is written from a Christian and conservative background, but cognizant of and generous toward the liberal mainstream of constitutional opinion that characterized his day. Historians, legal scholars, and philosophical fellow-travelers all will gain greatly by perusing this magnificent yet forgotten work.
Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
WordBridge Publishing
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Nov 30, 2009
Read more
Collapse
Pages
508
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9789076660103
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Law / Constitutional
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Why did the Plymouth colonists succeed and the Jamestown colonists fail in those important early years of settlement? How did the Framers of the Constitution deal with slavery? What was the principle force behind those feelings? What drove the debate against slavery in antebellum America? To what authority did the civil rights of the 1950s and 1960s leaders appeal for equality? What is the ugly truth pro-abortionists don't want us to know? Did man really evolve from ape-like creatures? Is the Earth millions of years old? Is the Bible reliable?

The answers to each of these questions establishes your moral identity, defining how you view yourself and others. How our nationits governors, legislators, presidents, and judgesanswers these questions, and how it uses these fundamental principles in establishing our laws, lays the foundation of our national moral conscience. It is that moral conscience that has consistently driven this nation forward in achieving justice and equality. Today, though, that moral conscience is being corrupted by a sinister ideology. A principle that is utterly antithetical to the one that has compelled our leaders to the highest moral standards.

This book looks at that original principle and how it guided our leaders as they steered this nation safely through the rough waters of change. It looks, also, at how that great principle has been undermined, leaving us adrift in a turbulent sea of crisis. Mostly, though, it seeks to point us back to that great principle as the source of strength, courage, and honorcharacter traits sadly missing from many of todays leaders in American politics.

Scapegoat Scales of Justice Burning is a book about my life and how my name was used to assist a large corporation avoid corporate responsibility and the consequences of a bad decision. The Supreme Court of Canada ruled that their decision was in bad faith and upheld a lower court judgment of one million dollars against Pilot Insurance Company. To the surprise of the author, they also named him as a catalyst in creating a train of thought with the decision makers of Pilot Insurance Company and also aligned him as one of the decision makers. This book is the authors attempt to prove with evidence compiled from the very court where he was never called to testify, that he was not a decision maker who made the decision to deny their insureds claim, and did not evoke a train of thought as described in the Supreme Court of Canada ruling. Scapegoat Scales of Justice Burning is also about the implications of abusing a persons name as if it carries no meaning or purpose. As exemplified by the description of some of my own ancestors, there is clearly more meaning in a persons name than the disrespect shown by the Supreme Court of Canada. A court that truly believes that its status is greater than the citizens it serves and the government that appoints Supreme Court of Canada Justices. Scapegoat Scales of Justice Burning has been a crusade that restores democratic rights for individual citizens of Canada and to confront those who would burn down the very foundation of justice. Natural justice has not been served. It is uncanny that in a democratic society, there would be no mechanism in place for judicial review and correction to address an injustice whereby ones reputation is damaged by comments made by a high court.
In America’s Constitution, one of this era’s most accomplished constitutional law scholars, Akhil Reed Amar, gives the first comprehensive account of one of the world’s great political texts. Incisive, entertaining, and occasionally controversial, this “biography” of America’s framing document explains not only what the Constitution says but also why the Constitution says it.

We all know this much: the Constitution is neither immutable nor perfect. Amar shows us how the story of this one relatively compact document reflects the story of America more generally. (For example, much of the Constitution, including the glorious-sounding “We the People,” was lifted from existing American legal texts, including early state constitutions.) In short, the Constitution was as much a product of its environment as it was a product of its individual creators’ inspired genius.

Despite the Constitution’s flaws, its role in guiding our republic has been nothing short of amazing. Skillfully placing the document in the context of late-eighteenth-century American politics, America’s Constitution explains, for instance, whether there is anything in the Constitution that is unamendable; the reason America adopted an electoral college; why a president must be at least thirty-five years old; and why–for now, at least–only those citizens who were born under the American flag can become president.

From his unique perspective, Amar also gives us unconventional wisdom about the Constitution and its significance throughout the nation’s history. For one thing, we see that the Constitution has been far more democratic than is conventionally understood. Even though the document was drafted by white landholders, a remarkably large number of citizens (by the standards of 1787) were allowed to vote up or down on it, and the document’s later amendments eventually extended the vote to virtually all Americans.

We also learn that the Founders’ Constitution was far more slavocratic than many would acknowledge: the “three fifths” clause gave the South extra political clout for every slave it owned or acquired. As a result, slaveholding Virginians held the presidency all but four of the Republic’s first thirty-six years, and proslavery forces eventually came to dominate much of the federal government prior to Lincoln’s election.

Ambitious, even-handed, eminently accessible, and often surprising, America’s Constitution is an indispensable work, bound to become a standard reference for any student of history and all citizens of the United States.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.