The Doctrine of State and the Principles of State Law

WordBridge Publishing
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Friedrich Julius Stahl was one of Germany's leading constitutional scholars in the 19th century, prior to the advent of Bismarck and the establishment of a united Germany. The Doctrine of State and the Principles of State Law is the centerpiece of his magnum opus, the Philosophy of Law. This is the first English-language translation of this key work of legal and political philosophy. It is written from a Christian and conservative background, but cognizant of and generous toward the liberal mainstream of constitutional opinion that characterized his day. Historians, legal scholars, and philosophical fellow-travelers all will gain greatly by perusing this magnificent yet forgotten work.
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Additional Information

Publisher
WordBridge Publishing
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Published on
Nov 30, 2009
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Pages
508
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ISBN
9789076660103
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Constitutional
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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In America’s Constitution, one of this era’s most accomplished constitutional law scholars, Akhil Reed Amar, gives the first comprehensive account of one of the world’s great political texts. Incisive, entertaining, and occasionally controversial, this “biography” of America’s framing document explains not only what the Constitution says but also why the Constitution says it.

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