Bandera County

Arcadia Publishing
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Located in the picturesque Texas Hill Country, Bandera County was named for nearby Bandera Pass, a naturally occurring passageway through the neighboring hills. Near the pass, the Medina River weaves its way through the county. In 1853, a group of settlers arrived and set up camp to make shingles from the huge cypress trees that grew along the river. Soon immigrant workers from Poland were recruited to work at a newly built sawmill. The beauty and abundance of resources also attracted an early group of Mormons, who established a nearby colony. The town of Bandera was designated the county seat at the formation of Bandera County in 1856. Bandera became a staging area for cattle drives up the Western Trail, and today the county still maintains its frontier character. The Western way of life prevails as visitors from around the world come to sample cowboy living on local dude ranches and enjoy honky-tonk music and dancehalls.
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About the author

The Frontier Times Museum was established in 1933 by J. Marvin Hunter, publisher of the Frontier Times magazine. Photographs for this publication were gathered from the museums historic photograph collection and were generously loaned by local families and the Bandera County Historical Commission.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Arcadia Publishing
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Published on
May 24, 2010
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Pages
128
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ISBN
9781439626061
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / State & Local / Southwest (AZ, NM, OK, TX)
Photography / Subjects & Themes / Historical
Photography / Subjects & Themes / Regional
Travel / Pictorials
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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