Constitution for a Disunited Nation: On Hungary's 2011 Fundamental Law

Central European University Press
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More than two decades after the post-communist constitutional transition, Hungary got into the spotlight again. As a result of the 2010 elections, the governing majority gained two-thirds of the seats in parliament, which made constitutional revision exceptionally easy, bypassing extensive political and social deliberations. In April 2011, on the first anniversary of the 2010 election, a brand new constitution was promulgated, named the Fundamental Law.

This collection is the most comprehensive account of the Fundamental Law and its underlying principles. The objective is to analyze this constitutional transition from the perspectives of comparative constitutional law, legal theory and political philosophy. The authors outline and analyze how the current constitutional changes are altering the basic structure of the Hungarian State. The key concepts of the theoretical inquiry are sociological and normative legitimacy, majoritarian and partnership approach to democracy, procedural and substantive elements of constitutionalism. Changes are also examined in the field of human rights, focusing on the principles of equality, dignity, and civil liberties.

 

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About the author

G bor Attila T¢th is Associate Professor at Debrecen University, Hungary

 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Central European University Press
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Published on
Dec 20, 2012
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Pages
586
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ISBN
9786155225185
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Constitutional
Political Science / Constitutions
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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