First Cut: Conversations with Film Editors

Univ of California Press
2
Free sample

First Cut offers an opportunity to learn what film editing really is, and to learn from the source. Gabriella Oldham's interviews with twenty-three award-winning film editors give a full picture of the complex art and craft of editing a film. Filled with animated anecdotes and detailed examples, this is the first book to provide a comprehensive treatment of both documentary and feature film editing.
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About the author

Gabriella Oldham is a freelance writer. Her books include First Cut: Conversations with Film Editors (UC Press), and Keaton’s Silent Shorts.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Univ of California Press
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Published on
Aug 1, 1992
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Pages
417
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ISBN
9780520911741
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Language
English
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Genres
Performing Arts / Film / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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African Film Studies: An Introduction is an accessible and authoritative textbook on African cinema as a field of study. The book provides a succinct and comprehensive study of the history, aesthetics, and theory of sub-Saharan African cinematic productions that is grounded in the field of film studies instead of textual interpretations from other disciplines.

Bringing African cinema out of the margins into the discipline of mainstream film studies and showcasing the diverse cinematic expressions of the continent, the book covers:

Overview of African cinema(s): Questions our assumptions about the continent’s cinematic productions and defines the characteristics of African cinema across linguistic, geographic, and filmic divides.

History of African and African-American cinema: Spans the history of film in Africa from colonial import and ‘appropriation of the gaze’ to the quest for individuality. It also establishes parallels in the historical development of black African cinema and African-American cinema.

Aesthetics: Introduces new research on previously unexplored aesthetic dimensions such as cinematography, animation, and film music.

Theoretical Approaches: Addresses a number of theoretical approaches and critical frameworks developed by scholars in the study of African cinema

All chapters include case studies, suggestions for further reading, and screening lists to deepen the reader’s knowledge with no prior knowledge of African cinema required. Students, teachers, and general film enthusiasts would all benefit from this accessible and engaging book.


Directed by the actor/film-maker Ida Lupino, The Bigamist (1953) is the story of Harry Graham, a salesman travelling between two towns and two wives. In its portrayal of Harry's 'double life', the film takes on a double life of its own, hovering as it does between two genres. Telling the story through Harry's voice-over, yet eschewing the iconic character of the femme fatale, Lupino's film reveals and recasts film noir as male melodrama par excellence. In its rendering of this emotionally paralysed man, The Bigamist is a fascinating study of the post-War male.

A collaborative affair, The Bigamist was written and produced by Lupino's ex-husband Collier Young, co-starring his current wife, Joan Fontaine, as bride number one, with Lupino in a turn as bride number two. The last of five films that Lupino directed for the independent production company that she co-founded, The Filmakers, it was notably the only film of its period with a woman director who also played a starring role.

Amelie Hastie explores the film in the context of Lupino's personal and professional history. This is a film, Hastie argues, that reveals the changing structure of Hollywood film production in light of the emergence of independent studies; it delineates the life and exemplifies the work of one of only two women directors in the 'Classical' Hollywood era; and it provides a complex commentary on the fantasies and fear of mid-century domestic life in the USA.

Amelie Hastie is Associate Professor of Film and Digital Media at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is the author of Cupboards of Curiosity: Women, Recollection and Film History (2007).

American filmmaker John Cassavetes (1929-1989) made only nine independent films during a quarter century, but those films affected the cinema culture of the 1960s to the 1980s in unprecedented ways. With a close nucleus of actors and crew members on his team, including his wife Gena Rowlands, Peter Falk, and Ben Gazzara, Cassavetes created films that explored the gritty side of human relationships. He staunchly advocated the right of actors and filmmakers to full artistic freedom over their work. Attracting both fervent admirers and harsh critics, Cassavetes's films have garnered prestigious awards in the US and Europe and continue to evoke strong reactions.
Starting in New York with his first film Shadows (1959), Cassavetes moved on to the West Coast with Faces (1968), Husbands (1970), Minnie and Moskowitz (1971), A Woman Under the Influence (1974), The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976), Opening Night (1977), Gloria (1980), and Love Streams (1984). He also directed several studio films, which often rankled his independent streak that rebelled against a loss of artistic freedom. Cassavetes's work in the theater and his performances in numerous television programs and films, including The Dirty Dozen (1967) and Rosemary's Baby (1968), made him, as a director, fiercely protective of his actors' right to self-expression.
Cassavetes's contributions to film as actor, writer, director, producer, and cinematographer at a time of radical changes in cinema history continue to inspire independent filmmakers to challenge creative restrictions and celebrate actors' artistic contributions. John Cassavetes: Interviews captures this "maverick" streak of an intensely personal filmmaker who was passionate about his art.
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