The Waterloo Archive: Volume IV: The British Sources, Volume 4

Frontline Books
Free sample

WATERLOO ARCHIVE VOLUME IV contains letters and journals written largely in the immediate aftermath of the whirlwind campaign of 1815, both from the frontline troops and the support services, including medical reports and those of civilians. This volume includes: * Letters by Sir Hussey Vivian and a much fuller version of the famous description by Frederick Ponsonby of his wounding and his subsequent adventures whilst lying on the battlefield during and after the battle. * The correspondence of officers in the infantry such as John Gardiner and George Barlow of the 69th Foot, and Daniel Mackinnon, famous for the defense of Hougoumont. * Representing the cavalry, we have Captain John Whale, Lifeguards, who appears to have written the opening circumstantial narrative of ‘A Near Observer’ for Miss Eaton and George Packe of the 13th Light Dragoons, and those who were not on the field during the battle such as Arthur Kennedy of the 18th Hussars and Dixon Denham of the 54th Foot. * A series of letters to Sir Charles Bell from various surgeons attending to the wounded in Brussels give both a fascinating and appalling view of the consequences of war. * A fascinating description from a witness of Napoleon onboard HMS Bellerophon at Plymouth including an original drawing of him before he sailed into exile on St. Helena and a journal of a marine officer during the subsequent passage.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

Gareth Glover a former Royal Navy Officer who lives in Cardiff. He has studied the Napoleonic wars for 30 years and gained a reputation as the foremost authority on British archive material. He has brought more than 20 previously unpublished Napoleonic memoirs into the public domain.
Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Frontline Books
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Oct 24, 2012
Read more
Collapse
Pages
304
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781783033249
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
History / Modern / 19th Century
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Winner, 2018 PEN/E.O. Wilson Prize for Literary Science Writing
Short-listed for the 2018 Wellcome Book Prize
A Top 10 Science Book of Fall 2017, Publishers Weekly
A Best History Book of 2017, The Guardian

"Warning: She spares no detail!" —Erik Larson, bestselling author of Dead Wake

In The Butchering Art, the historian Lindsey Fitzharris reveals the shocking world of nineteenth-century surgery and shows how it was transformed by advances made in germ theory and antiseptics between 1860 and 1875. She conjures up early operating theaters—no place for the squeamish—and surgeons, who, working before anesthesia, were lauded for their speed and brute strength. These pioneers knew that the aftermath of surgery was often more dangerous than patients’ afflictions, and they were baffled by the persistent infections that kept mortality rates stubbornly high. At a time when surgery couldn’t have been more hazardous, an unlikely figure stepped forward: a young, melancholy Quaker surgeon named Joseph Lister, who would solve the riddle and change the course of history.

Fitzharris dramatically reconstructs Lister’s career path to his audacious claim that germs were the source of all infection and could be countered by a sterilizing agent applied to wounds. She introduces us to Lister’s contemporaries—some of them brilliant, some outright criminal—and leads us through the grimy schools and squalid hospitals where they learned their art, the dead houses where they studied, and the cemeteries they ransacked for cadavers.

Eerie and illuminating, The Butchering Art celebrates the triumph of a visionary surgeon whose quest to unite science and medicine delivered us into the modern world.

German troops formed the majority of Wellington’s forces present at the Battle of Waterloo including those of Nassau, Brunswick, Hanover and the King’s German Legion, and they have left a large number of first-hand accounts of their role in the battle. The actions of the King's German Legion – an integral part of the British Army and partly officered by British soldiers – has been published in English, but to a limited degree: Herbert Siborne published letters written to his father; Ompteda and Wheatley have had their memoirs published; and History of the King’s German Legion included a small number of letters, including the oft-misquoted account of the defence of La Haye Sainte by Major Baring. This forms a tiny proportion of the German material available. Therefore it is not surprising that early British histories of the battle have largely sidelined the achievements of the German troops, and this has been regurgitated by most that have followed. This situation did not change until the 1990s when Peter Hofschroer published his two-volume version of the campaign from the German perspective, which included snippets of German documents published in English for the first time. But even this proved not totally satisfactory, as it did not provide the whole document to allow full interpretation. There is a great need to provide an English version of much of the original German source material to redress the imbalance; this volume is intended to remedy that situation by publishing sixty of these reports and letters fully translated into English for the first time, giving a clearer insight into the significant role these troops played. Gareth Glover is a historian specialising in the Waterloo campaign and the Peninsular War. He left school at eighteen to join the Royal Navy as a Seaman Officer and completed his extensive training course at Dartmouth College. He has published articles in The Waterloo Journal and the Journal of the Royal Artillery, and a novel about Waterloo, Voices of Thunder. ‘Christmas Selection 2010, Napoleon.org website’
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.