BTWE Yellowstone Lake - June 15, 1990 - Yellowstone National Park: BEYOND THE WATER’S EDGE

blountspublishing@yahoo.com
Free sample

  Gary David Blounts

 Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals:

 Perpetual

Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal

“A Public Fisheries Project”

      The purpose of this:  Perpetual Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal “A Public Fisheries Project” is to be the initial public Social Media generated “Wild Trout Fisheries” data base site to monitor and publish the variable changes in our “Wild Trout” fisheries for Perpetuity”.

      This is an invitation for you, your friends or your fishing club to participate in conducting recaptures:  “Angling Day’s” published in all of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  These Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals encompass 35-years and contain over 1,500 - “Angling Day’s” documenting the daily “Wild Trout” catch rates, water temperature, water level, water turbidity, air temperature, weather conditions, daily hatches, stomach analysis from “Wild Trout” landed, “GDB” Custom Flies fished, fly fishing presentations, trout species, trout lengths and geographic location on over 35-different bodies of water in Montana, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Idaho and Washington.  

      This Perpetual cursory research projects objective is to ascertain skilled or professional anglers at blountspublishing@yahoo.com and have them return to each body of water on the precise date, geographic location and time period fished contained in every one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  Each  ascertain skilled or professional angler will document their “Angler Day” using the same format I used in each one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals along with their “Angler Day” photographs in “JPEG” format.  Each skilled or professional anglers “Angling Day” written documentation and photographs will be e-mailed to blountspublishing@yahoo.com and I will publish them in Gary David Blount “Yearly” Perpetual Rocky Mountain Fishing Journal. 

 To preview excerpts from each one of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals go to books.google.com and to view on You Tube.com in the search bar type Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.

Introduction

 

     The Yellowstone Drainage supports the largest inland population of native Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout on Earth.  The Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout is considered a shared resource in Yellowstone Lake:  Grizzly Bears, Black Bears, Bald Eagles Golden Eagles, Pelicans, Osprey, Great Blue Herons, Kingfishers, Gulls, Grebes, Terns, Loons, Mergansers, Mink, Otters, Wolves and Coyotes prey upon Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout.  In the Yellowstone drainage 200,000-pounds of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout are eaten each year by these animals and birds.

      Yellowstone Lake is the largest fresh water lake in the United States above 7,000-feet, it’s altitude is 7,733-feet above sea level.  The Yellowstone Lake encompasses 136 square miles, it is 20-miles long, 14-miles wide and has 110-miles of shoreline.  Yellowstone Lake is 320-feet deep at its deepest point.  The average depth is 139-feet.  Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout generally inhabit the upper 60-feet because their food source rarely occurs below that depth.  The average surface temperature in August is 60 degrees Fahrenheit; the bottom the temperature never rises above 42 degrees Fahrenheit.  The serenity of Yellowstone Lake can suddenly change with afternoon thunderstorms and their accompanying winds.  These winds can routinely produce 3-foot waves or larger within minutes on Yellowstone Lake.  With water temperatures averaging 41 degrees Fahrenheit you can develop hypothermia quickly if your vessel capsizes.

     Fishing season in Yellowstone Lake opens June 15th each year, usually!  There are 124-tributaries the Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout use for spawning including the largest tributary, the Yellowstone River.  These spawning tributaries open July 15th each year, however some remain closed all year.  The use of all lead fishing tackle is band; fisherman must use Non-Toxic alternative products.

      The West Thumb geyser basin area has intense heat in the lake sediments, which indicate a shallow thermal system underlying this more recent caldera.  If the lake level should fall just a few feet, an immense steam (hydrothermal) explosion could occur here.  Mary Bay and Indian Pond now show evidence of these craters.

Read more

About the author

  ABOUT THE AUTHOR

      Gary David Blount was born in Dunsmuir, California in 1955 to David Oliver Blount and Irene Rose Blount.  Gary lived on the banks of the Sacramento River and began fishing as soon as he could hold a fishing rod.  In 1964 his family moved to Moreland, Idaho on the banks of the Snake River.  While living in Moreland Gary’s father purchased a piece of property on the Henry’s Fork of the Snake River outside the town of Last Chance, Idaho.  Gary’s father was a schoolteacher and every summer they would fish the Henry’s Fork of the Snake River and all the waters in the “Golden Triangle” of Yellowstone National Park.  In 1966 the family moved to Sandy, Oregon on the banks of the Sandy River.  At this time the Sandy River was one of Oregon’s best Salmon and Steelhead Rivers.  At age eleven Gary began tying his own flies with fly tying instruction from his next-door neighbor, George Mac Alevy.  George was a professional Fly Tier and wrote a weekly fishing column “By the River’s Edge” in the local paper.  In 1984 Gary moved to Missoula, Montana and obtained a job with Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks as a Fisheries Technician.  Gary’s duties consisted of:  determining species composition, distribution, size, abundance and age of Wild Trout in Region 2 in Montana.  In August of 1984 he was assigned to perform a cursory sampling on Rattlesnake Creek, which flows through the town of Missoula.  Rattlesnake Creek upstream from the Water Company Dam, which is three-miles north of Missoula, had been closed to all fishing since 1940.  After two-days fishing Rattlesnake Creek Gary realized the fishing regulations on Native Westslope Cutthroat Trout were far to liberal in the region and most of the Westslope Cutthroat Trout brood stock were being harvested from all Western Montana waters.  Gary had spent all summer performing population estimates on over eighty bodies of water in Region 2 and had not seen a fishery that even compared to the fishery in Rattlesnake Creek.  Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks did not have the funds available to do a study on Rattlesnake Creek so Gary originated a privately funded research project, Rattlesnake Creek Research Project.  Today there are special regulations for Montana’s Native Westslope Cutthroat Trout in all of Western Montana waters as a result of Gary’s Rattlesnake Creek Research Project.

      Gary moved to West Yellowstone, Montana in 1989 and worked as a fishing guide for two-years before becoming a licensed fishing outfitter.  Gary owned and operated Yellowstone Catch & Release Outfitter until 1996.  In 1994 Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks made an Associated Press Release that stated that the Madison River had Whirling Disease and the Rainbow Trout population had diminished from 3,000 Rainbow Trout per mile of stream to less than 300 Rainbow Trout per mile of stream.  This Associated Press Release unfortunately force Gary out of the outfitting business.

Read more
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
blountspublishing@yahoo.com
Read more
Published on
Sep 1, 2016
Read more
Pages
53
Read more
Read more
Best For
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Adventurers & Explorers
Biography & Autobiography / Artists, Architects, Photographers
Biography & Autobiography / Environmentalists & Naturalists
Biography & Autobiography / Sports
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.


     Rock Creek
is located 25-east of Missoula, Montana off Interstate 90.  Rock Creek headwaters originate from
three-Mountain Ranges.  The North Fork
of Rock Creek and the West Fork of Rock Creek originate from the Sapphire
Mountain Range.  The East Fork of Rock
Creek and the Middle Fork of Rock Creek originate from the Anaconda Mountain
Range and the Anaconda – Pintler Wilderness Area.  The Upper Willow Creek originates from the John Long
Mountains.  There are numerous small
streams flowing into Rock Creek on its journey north to its confluence with the
Clarkfork of the Columbia River.





     In the
1980’s Rock Creek contained roughly 2,000 Rainbow Trout per mile of stream in
the lower 28-miles of Rock Creek; from Gillies Bridge downstream to the mouth
of Rock Creek.  In the 1990’s the
Rainbow Trout population in Rock Creek plummeted to just 300 Rainbow Trout per
mile of stream.  This drastic decline in
the Rainbow Trout population was caused by Whirling Disease and by the Montana
Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks decision to halt the stocking of Hatchery
Rainbow Trout into the East Fork of Rock Creek Reservoir.  To this day there has been no significant
increase in the Rock Creek Rainbow Trout population.  However, the Native Westslope Cutthroat Trout population in Rock
Creek has rebounded somewhat to fill the void of lost Rainbow Trout population.  Also the non-native Brown Trout population
is on the increase.





     The Rock
Creek fishery consists of native Westslope Cutthroat Trout up to 24-inches in
length, native Bull Trout up to 36-inches in length, native Mountain Whitefish
up to 24-inches in length, non-native Brown Trout up to 26-inches in length,
non-native Rainbow Trout up to 24-inches in length and non-native Brook Trout
up to 14-inches in length.





     Important
Entomology And Forage Fish on Rock Creek are:





Stone Flies:





1.  Skwala (Skwala
parallela)



March – April (Size 8-10-12-14)





2.  Salmon Fly (Pteronarcys
californica) May – July (Size 2-4-6-8)





3.  Western Big
Golden Stone (Calineuria californica)



May – August (Size 4-6-8-10-12)





4.  Western Medium
Golden Brown Stone (Isoperla sp.)



June – September (Size 4-6-8-10)





5.  Little Yellow
Stone (Alloperla pallidula)



June – October (Size 12-14-16-18)





6.  Little Olive
Stone (Alloperla delicata)



May – August (Size 12-14-16-18)





7.  Winter Stone (Capina
sp.)



January – March (Size 14-16-18)

 

May Flies:





1.  Western Black
Quill (Rhithrogenahageni)



March – April (Size 12-14)





2.  Early Blue-Winged
Olive (Baetis tricaudatus)



March – April (Size 14-16-18)





3.  Late Blue-Winged
Olive (Baetis parvus)



June – November (Size 16-22)





4.  Little Western
Blue-Winged Olive (Ephemerella margarita) July – September (Size 16-22)





5.  Western Green
Drake (Drunella grandis)



June – July (Size 10-12)





6.  Pale Morning Dun (Ephemerella
inermis and Ephemerella infrequens)



May –September (Size 14-16-18)





7.  Small Western
Green Drake (Ephemerella flavilinea)



June – August (Size 14-16)





8.  Western Leadwing (Isonychia
sicca)



June – July Size (Size 10-12)





9.  Dark Gray Quill (Ameletus
connectus)



May – June (Size 12-14)





10.  White Winged
Black (Tricorythodes minutus)



July – October (Size 18-20)





11.  Midges (Diptera
/ Chironomous)

 

Caddis
Flies





1.  Grannom (Brachycentrus
occidentalis)



April – May (Size 12-14-16)





2.  Green Sedge (Ryacophila
sp.)



April – October (Size 10-12-14-16)





3.  Great Gray
Spotted Sedge (Arctopsyche grandis)



May – August (Size 8-10-12)





4.  Little Tan Short
Horn Sedge (Glossosoma sp.)



June – August (Size 14-16-18)





5.  Spotted Sedge (Hydropsyche
sp.)



July – October (Size 12-14-16)





6.  Little Plain
Brown Sedge (Lepidostoma pluviale)



June – August (Size 14-16-18)





7.  Giant Orange
Sedge (Dicosmoecus sp.)



September – October (Size 6-8-10-12)





8.  Spruce Bud
Worm Moth



July – August (Size 10-12-14)





Forage
Fish





1.  Mottled Sculpin (Cottus
bairdi)



Year Round (Size 3/0-2/0-1/0-2-4-6-8)





2. Slimy Sculpin (Cottus cognatus)



Year Round (Size 3/0-2/0-1/0-2-4-6-8)





3.  Black-Nose Dace (Rhinichthys
cataractae)



Year Round (Size 3/0-2/0-1/0-2-4-6-8)


  Gary David Blount’s

 Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals:

 Perpetual

Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal

“A Public Fisheries Project”

      The purpose of this:  Perpetual Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal “A Public Fisheries Project” is to be the initial public Social Media generated “Wild Trout Fisheries” data base site to monitor and publish the variable changes in our “Wild Trout” fisheries for Perpetuity”.

      This is an invitation for you, your friends or your fishing club to participate in conducting recaptures:  “Angling Day’s” published in all of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  These Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals encompass 35-years and contain over 1,500 - “Angling Day’s” documenting the daily “Wild Trout” catch rates, water temperature, water level, water turbidity, air temperature, weather conditions, daily hatches, stomach analysis from “Wild Trout” landed, “GDB” Custom Flies fished, fly fishing presentations, trout species, trout lengths and geographic location on over 35-different bodies of water in Montana, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Idaho and Washington.  

      This Perpetual cursory research projects objective is to ascertain skilled or professional anglers at blountspublishing@yahoo.com and have them return to each body of water on the precise date, geographic location and time period fished contained in every one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  Each  ascertain skilled or professional angler will document their “Angler Day” using the same format I used in each one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals along with their “Angler Day” photographs in “JPEG” format.  Each skilled or professional anglers “Angling Day” written documentation and photographs will be e-mailed to blountspublishing@yahoo.com and I will publish them in Gary David Blount “Yearly” Perpetual Rocky Mountain Fishing Journal. 

To preview excerpts from each one of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals go to books.google.com and to view on You Tube.com in the search bar type Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals. 

 Gary David Blount’s

 Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals:

 Perpetual

Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal

“A Public Fisheries Project”

      The purpose of this:  Perpetual Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal “A Public Fisheries Project” is to be the initial public Social Media generated “Wild Trout Fisheries” data base site to monitor and publish the variable changes in our “Wild Trout” fisheries for Perpetuity”.

      This is an invitation for you, your friends or your fishing club to participate in conducting recaptures:  “Angling Day’s” published in all of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  These Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals encompass 35-years and contain over 1,500 - “Angling Day’s” documenting the daily “Wild Trout” catch rates, water temperature, water level, water turbidity, air temperature, weather conditions, daily hatches, stomach analysis from “Wild Trout” landed, “GDB” Custom Flies fished, fly fishing presentations, trout species, trout lengths and geographic location on over 35-different bodies of water in Montana, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Idaho and Washington.  

      This Perpetual cursory research projects objective is to ascertain skilled or professional anglers at blountspublishing@yahoo.com and have them return to each body of water on the precise date, geographic location and time period fished contained in every one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  Each  ascertain skilled or professional angler will document their “Angler Day” using the same format I used in each one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals along with their “Angler Day” photographs in “JPEG” format.  Each skilled or professional anglers “Angling Day” written documentation and photographs will be e-mailed to blountspublishing@yahoo.com and I will publish them in Gary David Blount “Yearly” Perpetual Rocky Mountain Fishing Journal. 

To preview excerpts from each one of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals go to books.google.com and to view on You Tube.com in the search bar type Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.

        Gary David Blount’s

 Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals:

 Perpetual

Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal

“A Public Fisheries Project”

      The purpose of this:  Perpetual Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal “A Public Fisheries Project” is to be the initial public Social Media generated “Wild Trout Fisheries” data base site to monitor and publish the variable changes in our “Wild Trout” fisheries for Perpetuity”.

      This is an invitation for you, your friends or your fishing club to participate in conducting recaptures:  “Angling Day’s” published in all of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  These Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals encompass 35-years and contain over 1,500 - “Angling Day’s” documenting the daily “Wild Trout” catch rates, water temperature, water level, water turbidity, air temperature, weather conditions, daily hatches, stomach analysis from “Wild Trout” landed, “GDB” Custom Flies fished, fly fishing presentations, trout species, trout lengths and geographic location on over 35-different bodies of water in Montana, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Idaho and Washington.  

      This Perpetual cursory research projects objective is to ascertain skilled or professional anglers at blountspublishing@yahoo.com and have them return to each body of water on the precise date, geographic location and time period fished contained in every one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  Each  ascertain skilled or professional angler will document their “Angler Day” using the same format I used in each one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals along with their “Angler Day” photographs in “JPEG” format.  Each skilled or professional anglers “Angling Day” written documentation and photographs will be e-mailed to blountspublishing@yahoo.com and I will publish them in Gary David Blount “Yearly” Perpetual Rocky Mountain Fishing Journal. 

 To preview excerpts from each one of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals go to books.google.com and to view on You Tube.com in the search bar type Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.

Introduction

      The headwaters of the Bitterroot River originate from two-major Head Waters.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River originates from the Sapphire Mountains and Anaconda Pintler Wilderness Areas.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River originates from the Bitterroot Mountains and the Selway – Bitterroot Wilderness Areas.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River was dammed in the early 1900’s creating Painted Rocks Reservoir.  Below Painted Rocks Reservoir lies the tail-water fishery section of the West Fork of the Bitterroot River, which flows downstream to its confluence with the East Fork of the Bitterroot River north of the town of Conner, Montana.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River is still a free flowing stream.  The Wild Fires of “2000” burned much of the timberland in the headwaters of both drainages.  During spring run-off and summer thunderstorms the East Fork of the Bitterroot River turns turbid from the ash that is washed into the river from the tributaries flowing into the river.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River however remains clear, Painted Rocks Reservoir allows the headwater run-off to settle out within the reservoir before entering the West Fork of the Bitterroot River below the dam.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River confluence with the West Fork of the Bitterroot River forms the mainsteam of the Bitterroot River, which flows northerly to its confluence with the Clarkfork River outside the city of Missoula, Montana.

      The Bitterroot River trout fishery has experienced depravation from mankind since the early 1900’s when Marcus Daly “The Copper King” and others commissioned the building of an extensive network of irrigation canals throughout the Bitterroot Valley.  The largest canal is the Big Ditch, which runs northerly over seventy-five miles in length traversing the eastside of the Bitterroot River Valley.  They built large diversion dams across the Bitterroot River and diverted most of the tributaries in the Bitterroot Valley.  These diversion dams dewater the Bitterroot River severely during the summer months.  Most of the Bitterroot Tributaries become dry during critical spawning periods for Rainbow Trout, Westslope Cutthroat Trout, Brown Trout and Bull Trout.  With these depravation problems on the Bitterroot River there are still some sections of the Bitterroot River that offer good fishing for Rainbow Trout, Brown Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout and to a lesser degree Bull Trout.

      The Bitterroot River at time offers some excellent dry fly fishing.  In March and April there are Stone Flies: Skwala Stone Flies (Skwala parallela) and Winter Stone Flies (Capina sp.), May Flies:  Midges (Diptera / Chironomous), Early Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis tricaudatus), Dark Gray Quill (Ameletus connectus) and Caddies Flies:  Grannom (Brachycentrus occidentalis) and Green Sedge (Ryacophila sp.).

      In May, June, July and August there are Stone Flies:  Salmon Fly (Pteronarcys californica), Western Big Golden Stone Fly (Calineuria californica), Western Medium Golden Brown Stone Fly (Isoperla sp.), Little Yellow Stone Fly (Alloperla pallidula) and Little Olive Stone Fly (Alloperla delicata); May Flies:  Midges (Diptera / Chironomous), Late Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis parvus), Little Western Blue-Winged Olive (Ephemerella margarita), Western Green Drake (Drunella grandis), Pale Morning Dun (Ephemerella inermis and Ephemerella infrequens), Small Western Green Drake (Ephemerella flavilinea), Western Leadwing (Isonychia sicca) and Dark Gray Quill (Ameletus connectus); Caddis Flies:  Grannom (Brachycentrus occidentalis), Green Sedge (Ryacophila sp.), Great Gray Spotted Sedge (Arctopsyche grandis), Little Tan Short Horn Sedge (Glossosoma sp.), Ring Horn Microcaddis (Leucotrichia pictipes), Spotted Sedge (Hydropsyche sp.), Little Sister Sedge (Cheumatopsyche campyla) and Little Plain Brown Sedge (Lepidostoma pluviale).

      In September and October there are May Flies:  Late Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis parvus), Little Western Blue-Winged Olive (Ephemerella margarita), Tiny Western Olive (Pseudocloeon edmundsi), Pale Morning Dun (Ephemerella inermis and Ephemerella infrequens), Gray Drake (Siphlonurus occidentalis), White Winged Black (Tricorythodes minutus), Caddis:  Giant Orange Sedge (Dicosmoecus sp.) and Midges (Diptera / Chironomous). 

        Gary David Blount’s

 Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals:

 Perpetual

Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal

“A Public Fisheries Project”

      The purpose of this:  Perpetual Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal “A Public Fisheries Project” is to be the initial public Social Media generated “Wild Trout Fisheries” data base site to monitor and publish the variable changes in our “Wild Trout” fisheries for Perpetuity”.

      This is an invitation for you, your friends or your fishing club to participate in conducting recaptures:  “Angling Day’s” published in all of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  These Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals encompass 35-years and contain over 1,500 - “Angling Day’s” documenting the daily “Wild Trout” catch rates, water temperature, water level, water turbidity, air temperature, weather conditions, daily hatches, stomach analysis from “Wild Trout” landed, “GDB” Custom Flies fished, fly fishing presentations, trout species, trout lengths and geographic location on over 35-different bodies of water in Montana, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Idaho and Washington.  

      This Perpetual cursory research projects objective is to ascertain skilled or professional anglers at blountspublishing@yahoo.com and have them return to each body of water on the precise date, geographic location and time period fished contained in every one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  Each  ascertain skilled or professional angler will document their “Angler Day” using the same format I used in each one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals along with their “Angler Day” photographs in “JPEG” format.  Each skilled or professional anglers “Angling Day” written documentation and photographs will be e-mailed to blountspublishing@yahoo.com and I will publish them in Gary David Blount “Yearly” Perpetual Rocky Mountain Fishing Journal. 

 To preview excerpts from each one of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals go to books.google.com and to view on You Tube.com in the search bar type Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.

Introduction

      The headwaters of the Bitterroot River originate from two-major Head Waters.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River originates from the Sapphire Mountains and Anaconda Pintler Wilderness Areas.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River originates from the Bitterroot Mountains and the Selway – Bitterroot Wilderness Areas.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River was dammed in the early 1900’s creating Painted Rocks Reservoir.  Below Painted Rocks Reservoir lies the tail-water fishery section of the West Fork of the Bitterroot River, which flows downstream to its confluence with the East Fork of the Bitterroot River north of the town of Conner, Montana.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River is still a free flowing stream.  The Wild Fires of “2000” burned much of the timberland in the headwaters of both drainages.  During spring run-off and summer thunderstorms the East Fork of the Bitterroot River turns turbid from the ash that is washed into the river from the tributaries flowing into the river.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River however remains clear, Painted Rocks Reservoir allows the headwater run-off to settle out within the reservoir before entering the West Fork of the Bitterroot River below the dam.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River confluence with the West Fork of the Bitterroot River forms the mainsteam of the Bitterroot River, which flows northerly to its confluence with the Clarkfork River outside the city of Missoula, Montana.

      The Bitterroot River trout fishery has experienced depravation from mankind since the early 1900’s when Marcus Daly “The Copper King” and others commissioned the building of an extensive network of irrigation canals throughout the Bitterroot Valley.  The largest canal is the Big Ditch, which runs northerly over seventy-five miles in length traversing the eastside of the Bitterroot River Valley.  They built large diversion dams across the Bitterroot River and diverted most of the tributaries in the Bitterroot Valley.  These diversion dams dewater the Bitterroot River severely during the summer months.  Most of the Bitterroot Tributaries become dry during critical spawning periods for Rainbow Trout, Westslope Cutthroat Trout, Brown Trout and Bull Trout.  With these depravation problems on the Bitterroot River there are still some sections of the Bitterroot River that offer good fishing for Rainbow Trout, Brown Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout and to a lesser degree Bull Trout.

      The Bitterroot River at time offers some excellent dry fly fishing.  In March and April there are Stone Flies: Skwala Stone Flies (Skwala parallela) and Winter Stone Flies (Capina sp.), May Flies:  Midges (Diptera / Chironomous), Early Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis tricaudatus), Dark Gray Quill (Ameletus connectus) and Caddies Flies:  Grannom (Brachycentrus occidentalis) and Green Sedge (Ryacophila sp.).

      In May, June, July and August there are Stone Flies:  Salmon Fly (Pteronarcys californica), Western Big Golden Stone Fly (Calineuria californica), Western Medium Golden Brown Stone Fly (Isoperla sp.), Little Yellow Stone Fly (Alloperla pallidula) and Little Olive Stone Fly (Alloperla delicata); May Flies:  Midges (Diptera / Chironomous), Late Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis parvus), Little Western Blue-Winged Olive (Ephemerella margarita), Western Green Drake (Drunella grandis), Pale Morning Dun (Ephemerella inermis and Ephemerella infrequens), Small Western Green Drake (Ephemerella flavilinea), Western Leadwing (Isonychia sicca) and Dark Gray Quill (Ameletus connectus); Caddis Flies:  Grannom (Brachycentrus occidentalis), Green Sedge (Ryacophila sp.), Great Gray Spotted Sedge (Arctopsyche grandis), Little Tan Short Horn Sedge (Glossosoma sp.), Ring Horn Microcaddis (Leucotrichia pictipes), Spotted Sedge (Hydropsyche sp.), Little Sister Sedge (Cheumatopsyche campyla) and Little Plain Brown Sedge (Lepidostoma pluviale).

      In September and October there are May Flies:  Late Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis parvus), Little Western Blue-Winged Olive (Ephemerella margarita), Tiny Western Olive (Pseudocloeon edmundsi), Pale Morning Dun (Ephemerella inermis and Ephemerella infrequens), Gray Drake (Siphlonurus occidentalis), White Winged Black (Tricorythodes minutus), Caddis:  Giant Orange Sedge (Dicosmoecus sp.) and Midges (Diptera / Chironomous). 

             Gary David Blount’s

 Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals:

 Perpetual

Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal

“A Public Fisheries Project”

      The purpose of this:  Perpetual Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal “A Public Fisheries Project” is to be the initial public Social Media generated “Wild Trout Fisheries” data base site to monitor and publish the variable changes in our “Wild Trout” fisheries for Perpetuity”.

      This is an invitation for you, your friends or your fishing club to participate in conducting recaptures:  “Angling Day’s” published in all of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  These Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals encompass 35-years and contain over 1,500 - “Angling Day’s” documenting the daily “Wild Trout” catch rates, water temperature, water level, water turbidity, air temperature, weather conditions, daily hatches, stomach analysis from “Wild Trout” landed, “GDB” Custom Flies fished, fly fishing presentations, trout species, trout lengths and geographic location on over 35-different bodies of water in Montana, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Idaho and Washington.  

      This Perpetual cursory research projects objective is to ascertain skilled or professional anglers at blountspublishing@yahoo.com and have them return to each body of water on the precise date, geographic location and time period fished contained in every one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  Each  ascertain skilled or professional angler will document their “Angler Day” using the same format I used in each one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals along with their “Angler Day” photographs in “JPEG” format.  Each skilled or professional anglers “Angling Day” written documentation and photographs will be e-mailed to blountspublishing@yahoo.com and I will publish them in Gary David Blount “Yearly” Perpetual Rocky Mountain Fishing Journal. 

 To preview excerpts from each one of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals go to books.google.com and to view on You Tube.com in the search bar type Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.

Introduction

      The headwaters of the Bitterroot River originate from two-major Head Waters.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River originates from the Sapphire Mountains and Anaconda Pintler Wilderness Areas.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River originates from the Bitterroot Mountains and the Selway – Bitterroot Wilderness Areas.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River was dammed in the early 1900’s creating Painted Rocks Reservoir.  Below Painted Rocks Reservoir lies the tail-water fishery section of the West Fork of the Bitterroot River, which flows downstream to its confluence with the East Fork of the Bitterroot River north of the town of Conner, Montana.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River is still a free flowing stream.  The Wild Fires of “2000” burned much of the timberland in the headwaters of both drainages.  During spring run-off and summer thunderstorms the East Fork of the Bitterroot River turns turbid from the ash that is washed into the river from the tributaries flowing into the river.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River however remains clear, Painted Rocks Reservoir allows the headwater run-off to settle out within the reservoir before entering the West Fork of the Bitterroot River below the dam.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River confluence with the West Fork of the Bitterroot River forms the mainsteam of the Bitterroot River, which flows northerly to its confluence with the Clarkfork River outside the city of Missoula, Montana.

      The Bitterroot River trout fishery has experienced depravation from mankind since the early 1900’s when Marcus Daly “The Copper King” and others commissioned the building of an extensive network of irrigation canals throughout the Bitterroot Valley.  The largest canal is the Big Ditch, which runs northerly over seventy-five miles in length traversing the eastside of the Bitterroot River Valley.  They built large diversion dams across the Bitterroot River and diverted most of the tributaries in the Bitterroot Valley.  These diversion dams dewater the Bitterroot River severely during the summer months.  Most of the Bitterroot Tributaries become dry during critical spawning periods for Rainbow Trout, Westslope Cutthroat Trout, Brown Trout and Bull Trout.  With these depravation problems on the Bitterroot River there are still some sections of the Bitterroot River that offer good fishing for Rainbow Trout, Brown Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout and to a lesser degree Bull Trout.

      The Bitterroot River at time offers some excellent dry fly fishing.  In March and April there are Stone Flies: Skwala Stone Flies (Skwala parallela) and Winter Stone Flies (Capina sp.), May Flies:  Midges (Diptera / Chironomous), Early Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis tricaudatus), Dark Gray Quill (Ameletus connectus) and Caddies Flies:  Grannom (Brachycentrus occidentalis) and Green Sedge (Ryacophila sp.).

      In May, June, July and August there are Stone Flies:  Salmon Fly (Pteronarcys californica), Western Big Golden Stone Fly (Calineuria californica), Western Medium Golden Brown Stone Fly (Isoperla sp.), Little Yellow Stone Fly (Alloperla pallidula) and Little Olive Stone Fly (Alloperla delicata); May Flies:  Midges (Diptera / Chironomous), Late Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis parvus), Little Western Blue-Winged Olive (Ephemerella margarita), Western Green Drake (Drunella grandis), Pale Morning Dun (Ephemerella inermis and Ephemerella infrequens), Small Western Green Drake (Ephemerella flavilinea), Western Leadwing (Isonychia sicca) and Dark Gray Quill (Ameletus connectus); Caddis Flies:  Grannom (Brachycentrus occidentalis), Green Sedge (Ryacophila sp.), Great Gray Spotted Sedge (Arctopsyche grandis), Little Tan Short Horn Sedge (Glossosoma sp.), Ring Horn Microcaddis (Leucotrichia pictipes), Spotted Sedge (Hydropsyche sp.), Little Sister Sedge (Cheumatopsyche campyla) and Little Plain Brown Sedge (Lepidostoma pluviale).

      In September and October there are May Flies:  Late Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis parvus), Little Western Blue-Winged Olive (Ephemerella margarita), Tiny Western Olive (Pseudocloeon edmundsi), Pale Morning Dun (Ephemerella inermis and Ephemerella infrequens), Gray Drake (Siphlonurus occidentalis), White Winged Black (Tricorythodes minutus), Caddis:  Giant Orange Sedge (Dicosmoecus sp.) and Midges (Diptera / Chironomous). 

             Gary David Blount’s

 Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals:

 Perpetual

Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal

“A Public Fisheries Project”

      The purpose of this:  Perpetual Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal “A Public Fisheries Project” is to be the initial public Social Media generated “Wild Trout Fisheries” data base site to monitor and publish the variable changes in our “Wild Trout” fisheries for Perpetuity”.

      This is an invitation for you, your friends or your fishing club to participate in conducting recaptures:  “Angling Day’s” published in all of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  These Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals encompass 35-years and contain over 1,500 - “Angling Day’s” documenting the daily “Wild Trout” catch rates, water temperature, water level, water turbidity, air temperature, weather conditions, daily hatches, stomach analysis from “Wild Trout” landed, “GDB” Custom Flies fished, fly fishing presentations, trout species, trout lengths and geographic location on over 35-different bodies of water in Montana, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Idaho and Washington.  

      This Perpetual cursory research projects objective is to ascertain skilled or professional anglers at blountspublishing@yahoo.com and have them return to each body of water on the precise date, geographic location and time period fished contained in every one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  Each  ascertain skilled or professional angler will document their “Angler Day” using the same format I used in each one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals along with their “Angler Day” photographs in “JPEG” format.  Each skilled or professional anglers “Angling Day” written documentation and photographs will be e-mailed to blountspublishing@yahoo.com and I will publish them in Gary David Blount “Yearly” Perpetual Rocky Mountain Fishing Journal. 

 To preview excerpts from each one of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals go to books.google.com and to view on You Tube.com in the search bar type Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.

Introduction

      The headwaters of the Bitterroot River originate from two-major Head Waters.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River originates from the Sapphire Mountains and Anaconda Pintler Wilderness Areas.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River originates from the Bitterroot Mountains and the Selway – Bitterroot Wilderness Areas.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River was dammed in the early 1900’s creating Painted Rocks Reservoir.  Below Painted Rocks Reservoir lies the tail-water fishery section of the West Fork of the Bitterroot River, which flows downstream to its confluence with the East Fork of the Bitterroot River north of the town of Conner, Montana.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River is still a free flowing stream.  The Wild Fires of “2000” burned much of the timberland in the headwaters of both drainages.  During spring run-off and summer thunderstorms the East Fork of the Bitterroot River turns turbid from the ash that is washed into the river from the tributaries flowing into the river.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River however remains clear, Painted Rocks Reservoir allows the headwater run-off to settle out within the reservoir before entering the West Fork of the Bitterroot River below the dam.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River confluence with the West Fork of the Bitterroot River forms the mainsteam of the Bitterroot River, which flows northerly to its confluence with the Clarkfork River outside the city of Missoula, Montana.

      The Bitterroot River trout fishery has experienced depravation from mankind since the early 1900’s when Marcus Daly “The Copper King” and others commissioned the building of an extensive network of irrigation canals throughout the Bitterroot Valley.  The largest canal is the Big Ditch, which runs northerly over seventy-five miles in length traversing the eastside of the Bitterroot River Valley.  They built large diversion dams across the Bitterroot River and diverted most of the tributaries in the Bitterroot Valley.  These diversion dams dewater the Bitterroot River severely during the summer months.  Most of the Bitterroot Tributaries become dry during critical spawning periods for Rainbow Trout, Westslope Cutthroat Trout, Brown Trout and Bull Trout.  With these depravation problems on the Bitterroot River there are still some sections of the Bitterroot River that offer good fishing for Rainbow Trout, Brown Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout and to a lesser degree Bull Trout.

      The Bitterroot River at time offers some excellent dry fly fishing.  In March and April there are Stone Flies: Skwala Stone Flies (Skwala parallela) and Winter Stone Flies (Capina sp.), May Flies:  Midges (Diptera / Chironomous), Early Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis tricaudatus), Dark Gray Quill (Ameletus connectus) and Caddies Flies:  Grannom (Brachycentrus occidentalis) and Green Sedge (Ryacophila sp.).

      In May, June, July and August there are Stone Flies:  Salmon Fly (Pteronarcys californica), Western Big Golden Stone Fly (Calineuria californica), Western Medium Golden Brown Stone Fly (Isoperla sp.), Little Yellow Stone Fly (Alloperla pallidula) and Little Olive Stone Fly (Alloperla delicata); May Flies:  Midges (Diptera / Chironomous), Late Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis parvus), Little Western Blue-Winged Olive (Ephemerella margarita), Western Green Drake (Drunella grandis), Pale Morning Dun (Ephemerella inermis and Ephemerella infrequens), Small Western Green Drake (Ephemerella flavilinea), Western Leadwing (Isonychia sicca) and Dark Gray Quill (Ameletus connectus); Caddis Flies:  Grannom (Brachycentrus occidentalis), Green Sedge (Ryacophila sp.), Great Gray Spotted Sedge (Arctopsyche grandis), Little Tan Short Horn Sedge (Glossosoma sp.), Ring Horn Microcaddis (Leucotrichia pictipes), Spotted Sedge (Hydropsyche sp.), Little Sister Sedge (Cheumatopsyche campyla) and Little Plain Brown Sedge (Lepidostoma pluviale).

      In September and October there are May Flies:  Late Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis parvus), Little Western Blue-Winged Olive (Ephemerella margarita), Tiny Western Olive (Pseudocloeon edmundsi), Pale Morning Dun (Ephemerella inermis and Ephemerella infrequens), Gray Drake (Siphlonurus occidentalis), White Winged Black (Tricorythodes minutus), Caddis:  Giant Orange Sedge (Dicosmoecus sp.) and Midges (Diptera / Chironomous). 

            Gary David Blount’s

 Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals:

 Perpetual

Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal

“A Public Fisheries Project”

      The purpose of this:  Perpetual Wild Trout Recapture Angling Journal “A Public Fisheries Project” is to be the initial public Social Media generated “Wild Trout Fisheries” data base site to monitor and publish the variable changes in our “Wild Trout” fisheries for Perpetuity”.

      This is an invitation for you, your friends or your fishing club to participate in conducting recaptures:  “Angling Day’s” published in all of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  These Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals encompass 35-years and contain over 1,500 - “Angling Day’s” documenting the daily “Wild Trout” catch rates, water temperature, water level, water turbidity, air temperature, weather conditions, daily hatches, stomach analysis from “Wild Trout” landed, “GDB” Custom Flies fished, fly fishing presentations, trout species, trout lengths and geographic location on over 35-different bodies of water in Montana, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Idaho and Washington.  

      This Perpetual cursory research projects objective is to ascertain skilled or professional anglers at blountspublishing@yahoo.com and have them return to each body of water on the precise date, geographic location and time period fished contained in every one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.  Each  ascertain skilled or professional angler will document their “Angler Day” using the same format I used in each one of my Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals along with their “Angler Day” photographs in “JPEG” format.  Each skilled or professional anglers “Angling Day” written documentation and photographs will be e-mailed to blountspublishing@yahoo.com and I will publish them in Gary David Blount “Yearly” Perpetual Rocky Mountain Fishing Journal. 

 To preview excerpts from each one of Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals go to books.google.com and to view on You Tube.com in the search bar type Gary David Blount Rocky Mountain Fishing Journals.

Introduction

      The headwaters of the Bitterroot River originate from two-major Head Waters.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River originates from the Sapphire Mountains and Anaconda Pintler Wilderness Areas.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River originates from the Bitterroot Mountains and the Selway – Bitterroot Wilderness Areas.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River was dammed in the early 1900’s creating Painted Rocks Reservoir.  Below Painted Rocks Reservoir lies the tail-water fishery section of the West Fork of the Bitterroot River, which flows downstream to its confluence with the East Fork of the Bitterroot River north of the town of Conner, Montana.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River is still a free flowing stream.  The Wild Fires of “2000” burned much of the timberland in the headwaters of both drainages.  During spring run-off and summer thunderstorms the East Fork of the Bitterroot River turns turbid from the ash that is washed into the river from the tributaries flowing into the river.  The West Fork of the Bitterroot River however remains clear, Painted Rocks Reservoir allows the headwater run-off to settle out within the reservoir before entering the West Fork of the Bitterroot River below the dam.  The East Fork of the Bitterroot River confluence with the West Fork of the Bitterroot River forms the mainsteam of the Bitterroot River, which flows northerly to its confluence with the Clarkfork River outside the city of Missoula, Montana.

      The Bitterroot River trout fishery has experienced depravation from mankind since the early 1900’s when Marcus Daly “The Copper King” and others commissioned the building of an extensive network of irrigation canals throughout the Bitterroot Valley.  The largest canal is the Big Ditch, which runs northerly over seventy-five miles in length traversing the eastside of the Bitterroot River Valley.  They built large diversion dams across the Bitterroot River and diverted most of the tributaries in the Bitterroot Valley.  These diversion dams dewater the Bitterroot River severely during the summer months.  Most of the Bitterroot Tributaries become dry during critical spawning periods for Rainbow Trout, Westslope Cutthroat Trout, Brown Trout and Bull Trout.  With these depravation problems on the Bitterroot River there are still some sections of the Bitterroot River that offer good fishing for Rainbow Trout, Brown Trout and Westslope Cutthroat Trout and to a lesser degree Bull Trout.

      The Bitterroot River at time offers some excellent dry fly fishing.  In March and April there are Stone Flies: Skwala Stone Flies (Skwala parallela) and Winter Stone Flies (Capina sp.), May Flies:  Midges (Diptera / Chironomous), Early Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis tricaudatus), Dark Gray Quill (Ameletus connectus) and Caddies Flies:  Grannom (Brachycentrus occidentalis) and Green Sedge (Ryacophila sp.).

      In May, June, July and August there are Stone Flies:  Salmon Fly (Pteronarcys californica), Western Big Golden Stone Fly (Calineuria californica), Western Medium Golden Brown Stone Fly (Isoperla sp.), Little Yellow Stone Fly (Alloperla pallidula) and Little Olive Stone Fly (Alloperla delicata); May Flies:  Midges (Diptera / Chironomous), Late Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis parvus), Little Western Blue-Winged Olive (Ephemerella margarita), Western Green Drake (Drunella grandis), Pale Morning Dun (Ephemerella inermis and Ephemerella infrequens), Small Western Green Drake (Ephemerella flavilinea), Western Leadwing (Isonychia sicca) and Dark Gray Quill (Ameletus connectus); Caddis Flies:  Grannom (Brachycentrus occidentalis), Green Sedge (Ryacophila sp.), Great Gray Spotted Sedge (Arctopsyche grandis), Little Tan Short Horn Sedge (Glossosoma sp.), Ring Horn Microcaddis (Leucotrichia pictipes), Spotted Sedge (Hydropsyche sp.), Little Sister Sedge (Cheumatopsyche campyla) and Little Plain Brown Sedge (Lepidostoma pluviale).

      In September and October there are May Flies:  Late Blue-Winged Olive (Baetis parvus), Little Western Blue-Winged Olive (Ephemerella margarita), Tiny Western Olive (Pseudocloeon edmundsi), Pale Morning Dun (Ephemerella inermis and Ephemerella infrequens), Gray Drake (Siphlonurus occidentalis), White Winged Black (Tricorythodes minutus), Caddis:  Giant Orange Sedge (Dicosmoecus sp.) and Midges (Diptera / Chironomous). 

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.