Cancer Chemoprevention: Volume 1: Promising Cancer Chemopreventive Agents

Springer Science & Business Media
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Much progress has been made in discovering and developing agents that have promise, or have already been successfully used, to treat precancerous conditions or inhibit carcinogenesis. In Cancer Chemoprevention, Volume 1: Promising Cancer Chemopreventive Agents, leading researchers in the discovery and development of chemopreventives comprehensively survey all aspects of these emerging therapeutics. For each agent, the authors review the relevant mechanisms of action, the criteria for populations benefiting from intervention, the safety and pharmacodynamics, clinical study design emphasizing the use of precancers, and early associated cellular and molecular biomarkers of carcinogenesis. The pharmacologic and/or mechanistic classes discussed range from antimutagens, antiinflammatories, and the nuclear receptor superfamily, to signal transduction modulators, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. The classes vary widely in terms of their stages of development as chemopreventives and include both extensively studied groups and those with recently identified potential based on such mechanistic data as protein kinase inhibition. Attention is also devoted to nutriceuticals (food-derived agents) because of their high promise for prevention in healthy populations. The overall focus is on molecular targets and mechanisms. A second volume, Strategies for Cancer Chemoprevention, describes the exciting methodologies that are accelerating progress in this field and discusses the state of clinical development of chemoprevention in the various human cancer target organs.
Up-to-date and highly practical, Cancer Chemoprevention, Volumes 1 & 2, offer oncologists, pharmacologists, medicinal chemists, and toxicologists a comprehensive reference survey on the identification of promising cancer chemopreventive agents that will help stimulate further research and the development of novel approvable drugs.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Jun 4, 2004
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Pages
697
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ISBN
9781592597673
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Clinical Medicine
Medical / Oncology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Despite significant advances in cancer treatment and measures of neoplastic progression, drug effect (or early detection, overall cancer incidence has increased, pharmacodynamic markers), and markers that measure cancer-associated morbidity is considerable, and overall prognosis as well as predict responses to specific therapy. cancer survival has remained relatively flat over the past All these biomarkers have the potential to greatly augment several decades (1,2). However, new technology the development of successful chemoprevention therapies, allowing exploration of signal transduction pathways, but two specific types of biomarkers will have the most identification of cancer-associated genes, and imaging of immediate impact on successful chemopreventive drug tissue architecture and molecular and cellular function is development—those that measure the risk of developing increasing our understanding of carcinogenesis and cancer invasive life-threatening disease, and those whose mo- progression. This knowledge is moving the focus of cancer lation can “reasonably predict” clinical benefit and, therapeutics, including cancer preventive treatments, to therefore, serve as surrogate endpoints for later-occurring drugs that take advantage of cellular control mechanisms clinical disease. Thus far, the biomarker that best measures to selectively suppress cancer progression. these two phenomena is intraepithelial neoplasia (IEN) Carcinogenesis is now visualized as a multifocal, because it is a near obligate precursor to cancer.
With a new foreword by Dr. Dominic D'Agostino, PhD and epilogue by the author

A masterful synchronization of history and cutting-edge science shines new light on humanity's darkest diagnosis.

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With contributions from Thomas Seyfried, PhD, author of Cancer as a Metabolic Disease; Miriam Kalamian, EdM, MS, CNS, author of Keto for Cancer; and Beth Zupec Kania, consultant nutritionist of The Charlie Foundation.

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Despite significant advances in cancer treatment and measures of neoplastic progression, drug effect (or early detection, overall cancer incidence has increased, pharmacodynamic markers), and markers that measure cancer-associated morbidity is considerable, and overall prognosis as well as predict responses to specific therapy. cancer survival has remained relatively flat over the past All these biomarkers have the potential to greatly augment several decades (1,2). However, new technology the development of successful chemoprevention therapies, allowing exploration of signal transduction pathways, but two specific types of biomarkers will have the most identification of cancer-associated genes, and imaging of immediate impact on successful chemopreventive drug tissue architecture and molecular and cellular function is development—those that measure the risk of developing increasing our understanding of carcinogenesis and cancer invasive life-threatening disease, and those whose mo- progression. This knowledge is moving the focus of cancer lation can “reasonably predict” clinical benefit and, therapeutics, including cancer preventive treatments, to therefore, serve as surrogate endpoints for later-occurring drugs that take advantage of cellular control mechanisms clinical disease. Thus far, the biomarker that best measures to selectively suppress cancer progression. these two phenomena is intraepithelial neoplasia (IEN) Carcinogenesis is now visualized as a multifocal, because it is a near obligate precursor to cancer.
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