When the Tour Came to Auckland

Bridget Williams Books
Free sample


‘At 2.40pm Patu charged. A human tank. The first time during
the tour that a protest squad charged police lines with the intention of
breaking through . . .’

The Springbok rugby tour of New
Zealand in 1981 provoked the biggest mass protests in New Zealand
history. For two months tens of thousands of New Zealanders took to the
streets every week to register their opposition to the tour.

In When the Tour Came to Auckland, Geoff Chapple, author of 1981: The Tour,
describes the dramatic events in Auckland as a light aircraft
flour-bombed Eden Park and protesters battled police in the streets of
Mt Eden in the tour’s violent conclusion.

Includes a new introduction prepared especially for this BWB Text by Geoff Chapple.

 

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About the author

Geoff Chapple is a journalist, author and musician. He was arrested twice during the Springbok tour, and convicted of disorderly behaviour. He became known subsequently as the founder of the Te Araroa trail.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
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Published on
May 14, 2014
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Pages
50
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ISBN
9781927277461
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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This thought-provoking book is a search for answers to the vexing phenomenon of why the world's undisputed greatest rugby team can't win the World Cup. It is an in-depth investigation that explores how societal change, combined with the arrival of professionalism, has impacted on the ability of the All Blacks to perform on the biggest stage.The entire development programme for professional players comes under scrutiny to determine why the system keeps failing at critical junctures. Every aspect of the game is examined: the changed motivations of players since money was introduced; the New Zealand Rugby Union's obsession with the World Cup; the failure to produce strong leaders; the consequence of the arrival of Generation Y; the fixation with style over substance in terms of how the All Blacks play; and how the influx of Polynesian players has altered the way the nation coaches the game. All of these factors are analysed, with conclusions drawn on how each has played a role in preventing the All Blacks from winning the World Cup since 1987.Running through the narrative are the thoughts of many of the men who played for the 1987 All Blacks. Some of the greatest names in All Black history - Sean Fitzpatrick, Alan Whetton, David Kirk, Grant Fox and Brian Lochore - give their thoughts on the key themes and compare and contrast the amateur and professional eras.The end result is a compelling and authoritative read that gives the most detailed and comprehensive answer to a question everyone has asked but no one has ever satisfactorily answered.
The hero of 2011 was Martin Snedden. Not even a terrible earthquake prevented him from staging a magnificent World Cup. The hospitality and warmth of the New Zealand welcome at the World Cup is a memory I will always cherish.' - Paul Ackford, Sunday Telegraph, London. The story of New Zealand's greatest sporting event - and, ultimately - one of its greatest triumphs. Fascinating insights into some of the political machinations, this is not a sports book per say, although A STADIUM OF FOUR MILLION will still appeal to sports fans on many levels. Rather, this book is a compelling behind-the-scenes look at the managing of a large international event. As such it will appeal to business people and others in many fields, as a story of how a vision can be brought to stunning reality. On the night of 23 October 2011, anxious fans endured the heart-stopping last minutes of the Rugby World Cup final as the All Blacks ground out a win by the narrowest of margins to again lift the Webb Ellis Cup. Watching in the stands was Martin Snedden, who had been charged with organising and delivering the Rugby World Cup in New Zealand. In A STADIUM OF FOUR MILLION, Snedden provides an erudite and brilliantly insightful analysis of the event, the largest to date in New Zealand, with a detailed background of its successful staging. He takes us on the journey from the drama and excitement of 'selling our story' bidding for the tournament, through the organisation process to getting everyone working together to deliver it, with all the successes and speed bumps on the way. National and provincial rugby unions, tourism, accommodation and transport providers, two successive governments and, ultimately, all New Zealanders rallied to the cause. The 'stadium of four million' delivered - and delivered something special.
It remains a unique achievement. In 1971 the British Lions went to New Zealand and beat the All Blacks in a test series on their own soil.

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But this unique rugby feat also spawned a unique book, for after the touring party had returned to the UK, the Lions captain John Dawes had the idea of organising an International Players' Conference, at which he and some of the key members of his victorious team would discuss the latest trends in rugby and offer the fruits of their experience in how to beat the greatest rugby team in the world. These talks and lectures were subsequently edited into a book, The Lions Speak by the Daily Telegraph's Rugby Correspondent, John Reason. In the years since it was first published, it has assumed cult status as one of the best and most insightful books ever published about the game of rugby.

It stands as both a fascinating period piece about a sport that was played very differently in those days - when Bob Hiller would toe-punt penalties and conversions from a lovingly-crafted mud tee, and scrum halves like Gareth Edwards would launch his back-line from the scrum with a flamboyant diving pass - and a brilliant and witty deconstruction of the game's strategy and psychology by some of its most greatest and most intelligent practitioners, that is as relevant and valuable today as it ever was. Who better to talk about kicking and controlling the game than Barry John, or Mike Gibson on the role of the centre, or Carwyn James himself to reveal the secrets of his coaching methods that brought about the 1971 Lions' historic victory and British rugby's finest hour?

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