A Chapter of Adventures: Or, Through the Bombardment of Alexandria

Blackie & Son
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Publisher
Blackie & Son
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Published on
Dec 31, 1891
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Pages
288
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Language
English
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This content is DRM free.
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It would be difficult to find a fairer scene. Throughout the gardens lanterns of many shapes and devices threw their light down upon the paths, which were marked out by lines of little lamps suspended on wires a foot above the ground. In a treble row they encircled a large tank or pond and studded a little island in its center. Along the terraces were festoons and arches of innumerable lamps, while behind was the Palace or Castle, for it was called either; the Oriental doors and windows and the tracery of its walls lit up below by the soft light, while the outline of the upper part could scarce be made out. Eastern as the scene was, the actors were for the most part English. Although the crowd that promenaded the terrace was composed principally of men, of whom the majority were in uniform of one sort or another, the rest in evening dress, there were many ladies among them.
At the end of one of the terraces a band of the 103d Bengal Infantry was playing, and when they ceased a band of native musicians, at the opposite end of the terrace, took up the strains. Within, the palace was brilliantly lighted, and at the tables in one of the large apartments a few couples were still seated at supper. Among his guests moved the Rajah, chatting in fluent English, laughing with the men, paying compliments to the ladies, a thoroughly good fellow all round, as his guests agreed. The affair had been a great success. There had first been a banquet to the officers and civilians at the neighboring station. When this was over, the ladies began to arrive, and for their amusement there had been a native nautch upon a grand scale, followed by a fine display of fireworks, and then by supper, at which the Rajah had made a speech expressive of his deep admiration and affection for the British. This he had followed up by proposing the health of the ladies in flowery terms. Never was there a better fellow than the Rajah. He had English tastes, and often dined at one or other of the officers' messes. He was a good shot, and could fairly hold his own at billiards. He had first rate English horses in his stables, and his turnout was perfect in all respects. He kept a few horses for the races, and was present at every ball and entertainment. At Bithoor he kept almost open house. There was a billiard room and racquet courts, and once or twice a week there were luncheon parties, at which from twelve to twenty officers were generally present. In all India there was no Rajah with more pronounced English tastes or greater affection for English people. The one regret of his life, he often declared, was that his color and his religion prevented his entertaining the hope of obtaining an English wife. All this, as everyone said, was the more remarkable and praiseworthy, inasmuch as he had good grounds of complaint against the British Government.
G. A. Henty’s historical adventure stories have won the
admiration of readers across the world, helping to change the course of
children’s literature. For the first time in publishing history, Delphi
Classics is proud to present the complete works of G. A. Henty, with
numerous illustrations, many rare texts, introductions and the usual
Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Henty’s life and works
* ALL 92 novels, collected together for the first time, each with individual contents tables
* Many rare novels, available in no other collection
* Images of how the books were first printed, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts
* Excellent formatting of the texts
* Many of the novels are fully illustrated with their original artwork
* ALL of the shorter fiction, including many rare tales available nowhere else
* Special chronological and alphabetical contents tables for the short stories
* Easily locate the short stories you want to read
* Includes Henty’s non-fiction - spend hours exploring the author’s entire oeuvre
* Features a bonus biography by Henty’s friend and fellow author, George Manville Fenn - discover Henty’s literary life
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles


CONTENTS:

The Novels
A SEARCH FOR A SECRET
ALL BUT LOST
OUT ON THE PAMPAS
THE YOUNG FRANC-TIREURS
THE YOUNG BUGLERS
THE CORNET OF HORSE
IN TIMES OF PERIL
FACING DEATH
WINNING HIS SPURS
FRIENDS THOUGH DIVIDED
JACK ARCHER
UNDER DRAKE’S FLAG
BY SHEER PLUCK
WITH CLIVE IN INDIA
IN FREEDOM’S CAUSE
ST. GEORGE FOR ENGLAND
TRUE TO THE OLD FLAG
THE YOUNG COLONISTS
THE DRAGON AND THE RAVEN
FOR NAME AND FAME
THE LION OF THE NORTH
THROUGH THE FRAY
THE BRAVEST OF THE BRAVE
A FINAL RECKONING
THE YOUNG CARTHAGINIAN
WITH WOLFE IN CANADA
BONNIE PRINCE CHARLIE
FOR THE TEMPLE
GABRIEL ALLEN M. P.
IN THE REIGN OF TERROR
ORANGE AND GREEN
STURDY AND STRONG
CAPTAIN BAYLEY’S HEIR
THE CAT OF BUBASTES
THE CURSE OF CARNE’S HOLD
THE LION OF ST. MARK
BY PIKE AND DYKE
ONE OF THE 28TH
WITH LEE IN VIRGINIA
THE BOY KNIGHT
BY ENGLAND’S AID
BY RIGHT OF CONQUEST
CHAPTER OF ADVENTURES
A HIDDEN FOE
MAORI AND SETTLER
THE DASH FOR KHARTOUM
HELD FAST FOR ENGLAND
REDSKIN AND COWBOY
BERIC THE BRITON
CONDEMNED AS A NIHILIST
IN GREEK WATERS
RUJUB, THE JUGGLER
DOROTHY’S DOUBLE
A JACOBITE EXILE
SAINT BARTHOLOMEW’S EVE
THROUGH THE SIKH WAR
IN THE HEART OF THE ROCKIES
WHEN LONDON BURNED
WOMAN OF THE COMMUNE
WULF THE SAXON
A KNIGHT OF THE WHITE CROSS
THROUGH RUSSIAN SNOWS
THE TIGER OF MYSORE
AT AGINCOURT
ON THE IRRAWADDY
THE QUEEN’S CUP
WITH COCHRANE THE DAUNTLESS
COLONEL THORNDYKE’S SECRET
A MARCH ON LONDON
WITH FREDERICK THE GREAT
WITH MOORE AT CORUNNA
AT ABOUKIR AND ACRE
BOTH SIDES THE BORDER
THE LOST HEIR
UNDER WELLINGTON’S COMMAND
IN THE HANDS OF THE CAVE DWELLERS
NO SURRENDER!
A ROVING COMMISSION
WON BY THE SWORD
IN THE IRISH BRIGADE
JOHN HAWKE’S FORTUNE
OUT WITH GARIBALDI
WITH BULLER IN NATAL
AT THE POINT OF THE BAYONET
TO HERAT AND CABUL
WITH ROBERTS TO PRETORIA
THE TREASURE OF THE INCAS
WITH KITCHENER IN THE SOUDAN
WITH THE BRITISH LEGION
THROUGH THREE CAMPAIGNS
WITH THE ALLIES TO PEKIN
BY CONDUCT AND COURAGE

The Shorter Fiction
AN EDITOR’S YARNS
YARNS ON THE BEACH
THE PLAGUE SHIP
TALES OF DARING AND DANGER
STORIES FROM ‘THE BOY’S OWN’
THE RANCH IN THE VALLEY
THE GOLDEN CANYON
THE STONE CHEST
BATTLES OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
DASH AND DARING
BRAINS AND BRAVERY
HAZARD AND HEROISM
IN THE HANDS OF THE MALAYS
STEADY AND STRONG
AMONG MALAY PIRATES
A SOLDIER’S DAUGHTER AND OTHER STORIES
UNCOLLECTED STORIES

The Short Stories
LIST OF SHORT STORIES IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER
LIST OF SHORT STORIES IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

The Non-Fiction
THE MARCH TO MAGDALA
THE MARCH TO COOMASSIE
THOSE OTHER ANIMALS
QUEEN VICTORIA

The Biography
GEORGE ALFRED HENTY by George Manville Fenn

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Now, Hargate, what a fellow you are! I've been looking for you everywhere. Don't you know it's the House against the Town boys. It's lucky that the Town have got the first innings; they began a quarter of an hour ago. "How tiresome!" Frank Hargate said. "I was watching a most interesting thing here. Don't you see this little chaffinch nest in the bush, with a newly hatched brood. There was a small black snake threatening the nest, and the mother was defending it with quivering wings and open beak. I never saw a prettier thing. I sat quite still and neither of them seemed to notice me. Of course I should have interfered if I had seen the snake getting the best of it. When you came running up like a cart horse, the snake glided away in the grass, and the bird flew off. Oh, dear! I am sorry. I had forgotten all about the match." "I never saw such a fellow as you are, Hargate. Here's the opening match of the season, and you, who are one of our best bats, poking about after birds and snakes. Come along; Thompson sent me and two or three other fellows off in all directions to find you. We shall be half out before you're back. Wilson took James's wicket the first ball." Frank Hargate leaped to his feet, and, laying aside for the present all thoughts of his favorite pursuit, started off at a run to the playing field. His arrival there was greeted with a mingled chorus of welcome and indignation. Frank Hargate was, next to Thompson the captain of the Town eleven, the best bat among the home boarders. He played a steady rather than a brilliant game, and was noted as a good sturdy sticker. Had he been there, Thompson would have put him in at first, in order to break the bowling of the House team. As it was, misfortunes had come rapidly. Ruthven and Handcock were bowling splendidly, and none of the Town boys were making any stand against them. Thompson himself had gone in when the fourth wicket fell, and was still in, although two wickets had since fallen, for only four runs, and the seventh wicket fell just as Frank arrived, panting, on the ground.
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