Identity, Belonging and Migration

Oxford University Press
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This volume addresses the question of migration in Europe. It is concerned with the extent to which racism and anti-immigration discourse has been to some extent normalised and 'democratised' in European and national political discourses. Mainstream political parties are espousing increasingly coercive policies and frequently attempting to legitimate such approaches via nationalist-populist slogans and coded forms of racism. Identity, Belonging and Migration shows that that liberalism is not enough to oppose the disparate and diffuse xenophobia and racism faced by many migrants today and calls for new conceptions of anti-racism within and beyond the state. The book is divided into three parts and organised around a theoretical framework for understanding migration, belonging, and exclusion, which is subsequently developed through discussions of state and structural discrimination as well as a series of thematic case studies. In drawing on a range of rich and original data, this timely volume makes an important contribution to discussions on migration in Europe.
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About the author

Gerard Delanty is Professor of Sociology at the University of Sussex. Ruth Wodak is Professor of Discourse Studies at Lancaster University. Paul R. Jones is Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Liverpool.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Oxford University Press
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Published on
Feb 1, 2008
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9781846314537
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Ruth Wodak
Ruth Wodak
Austria does not often make political headlines. It has at least twice in recent years: in 1986, when the "Waldheim Affair" was debated worldwide, and in 1999, when the Austrian Freedom Party (FPOe) under Joerg Haider received 27 percent of the vote in national elections. Established by former Nazis for former Nazis, the FPOe entered the mainstream of Austrian politics when it became part of a coalition government. This volume explores whether its rise is a uniquely Austrian phenomenon or corresponds to broader social and political changes in Europe.

Parallels to Haider's party can be found in other European countries. Its anti-immigration agenda and rhetoric are similar to those of the French FN, the Belgian Vlaams Bloc, and the Italian Lega Nord. And its anti-European Union posture is similar to the sentiments of the "anti-Maastrich" wing of the British conservative party. However, European reaction to the FPOe's rise derives not only from its policies, but its linkage to past suspicions that the Austrians have not learned the lessons of history as had the Germans. The FPOe's success strengthened that impression. In response, 14 European Union governments downgraded their bilateral relations with the Austrian government to a purely technical level. Although the sanctions were lifted in September 2000, the spotlight is still very much on Austria, and concern about the FPOe remains high.

This important volume contains eleven chapters by internationally prominent scholars from a broad spectrum of the social sciences. Its cross-disciplinary approach provides perspective on the Haider phenomenon, its rhetoric, and its impact on daily life in Austria. It also analyzes the influence of right-wing populism on politics, culture, and society, and its implications in Austria as well as elsewhere in Europe. The Haider Phenomenon will be of interest to historians, political scientists, those in European studies, and scholars in contemporary political extremism.

Ruth Wodak is professor of applied linguistics and discourse analysis at the University of Vienna and director of the research center, "Discourse, Politics, Identity," at the Austrian Academy of Sciences. Anton Pelinka is professor of political science at the University of Innsbruck and director of the Institute of Conflict Research Vienna.
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