Cranial Meningiomas: Diagnosis — Biology — Therapy

Springer Science & Business Media
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The aim of the book is to describe the current approach to meningiomas on the basis of experience gained in the fields of histopathology, biology, radiology and surgery. The first section of the book deals with general diagnostic aspects. The typical histopathological features of meningiomas and the various abnormalities shown by imaging methods are discussed. The second section elucidates the growth pattern of meningiomas arising in various specific locations. Separate chapters are devoted to particular aspects of meningioma and to peritumoral edema. The third section covers the treatment of meningiomas. Surgical removal remains the basic therapy, while adjuvant methods include preoperative embolization, irradiation, and endocrine therapy.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Dec 6, 2012
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Pages
154
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ISBN
9783642725814
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Allied Health Services / Imaging Technologies
Medical / Clinical Medicine
Medical / Neurology
Medical / Oncology
Medical / Pathology
Medical / Surgery / Neurosurgery
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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