Chicano Education in the Era of Segregation

Al filo : Mexican American studies series

Book 7
University of North Texas Press
Free sample

Chicano Education in the Era of Segregation analyzes the socioeconomic origins of the theory and practice of segregated schooling for Mexican-Americans from 1910 to 1950. Gilbert G. Gonzalez links the various aspects of the segregated school experience, discussing Americanization, testing, tracking, industrial education, and migrant education as parts of a single system designed for the processing of the Mexican child as a source of cheap labor. The movement for integration began slowly, reaching a peak in the 1940s and 1950s. The 1947 Mendez v. Westminster case was the first federal court decision and the first application of the Fourteenth Amendment to overturn segregation based on the “separate but equal” doctrine. This paperback features an extensive new Preface by the author discussing new developments in the history of segregated schooling.
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About the author

GILBERT G. GONZALEZ is professor emeritus in the Chicano Latino Studies Department at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of numerous publications, including Guest Workers or Colonized Labor?, Mexican Consuls and Labor Organizing, Labor and Community, and Culture of Empire. Gonzalez co-directed and produced the award-winning documentary The Harvest of Loneliness.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of North Texas Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2013
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Pages
291
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ISBN
9781574415018
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / History
Education / Multicultural Education
History / United States / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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For over three decades the work of Antonia I. Castañeda has shaped the fields of Western History and Chicana Studies. From her early articles on Chicana representation and political economy, to her most recent work mapping gendered violence and gendered resistance in the history of the U.S. Southwest, her work is consistently taught in classrooms and cited extensively. Yet Castañeda's work has been scattered throughout journals and anthologies, a "paper chase" for historians to track down.  Three Decades of Engendering History ends the chase. This volume, edited by Linda Heidenreich, collects ten of Castañeda's best articles, including the widely circulated article "Engendering the History of Alta California, 1769-1848," in which she took a direct and honest look at sex and gender relations in colonial California. Demonstrating that there is no romantic past to which we can turn, she exposed stories of violence against women, as well as stories of survival and resistance. Other articles included are the prize-winning "Women of Color and the Rewriting of Western History," and two recent articles, "Lullabies y Canciones de Cuna" and "La Despedida." The latter two represent Castañeda’s most recent work excavating, mapping, and bringing forth the long and strong post-WWII history of Tejanas.  Finally, the volume includes three interviews with Antonia Castañeda, conducted by Luz María Gordillo, that contribute the important narrative of her lived experiences, political perspective, her commitment to initiate and develop scholarship that highlights gender and Chicanas as a legitimate line of inquiry, and her drive to center Chicanas as historical subjects.
Based on articles written for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, author Richard J. Gonzales draws on his educational, inner-city and professional life experiences to weave eyewitness testimony into issues facing Chicanos, including economic, health, education, criminal justice, politics, immigration, and cultural issues. Raza Rising presents a personal recounting of a Chicano's struggle with and understanding of the socio-economic policies and historical actions that impact their ascendancy. Raza Rising offers first-hand observations, supported by well-documented scholarly research, of Chicanos' growth and subsequent struggles to participate fully in North Texas' political and economic life.  Raza Rising takes the reader to the organization of a Fort Worth immigration reform march, to the actual march with 20,000 people on Main Street on Palm Sunday, to a protest demonstration of the City of Farmers Branch's attempt to prohibit renting to the undocumented immigrant, to the author's awakening in Chicago on the importance of learning, and to his poignant experience as a guest speaker in a Fort Worth public school classroom. Other observations offer insight on how Chicanos struggle with their ethnic identity and understanding of their history. In addition, the book highlights important historical and political events that illustrate Chicanos' attempts to overcome barriers to their rise.  At a time when global economic competition threatens the United States' first world status, this country must nurture academic excellence for all its citizens. Raza Rising provides specific explanations for the Chicano educational lag and workable solutions to accelerate their political, economic and academic achievements. Prophetic state and national demographers have forecasted the steady increase in Chicano populations and decrease in white populations. Raza Rising offers students, instructors, policy makers, politicians and neighbors a deeper understanding of Chicanos, who in the near future will transition from minority to majority status in Texas.
Four undocumented Mexican American students, two great teachers, one robot-building contest . . . and a major motion picture

In 2004, four Latino teenagers arrived at the Marine Advanced Technology Education Robotics Competition at the University of California, Santa Barbara. They were born in Mexico but raised in Phoenix, Arizona, where they attended an underfunded public high school. No one had ever suggested to Oscar, Cristian, Luis, or Lorenzo that they might amount to much—but two inspiring science teachers had convinced these impoverished, undocumented kids from the desert who had never even seen the ocean that they should try to build an underwater robot.
And build a robot they did. Their robot wasn't pretty, especially compared to those of the competition. They were going up against some of the best collegiate engineers in the country, including a team from MIT backed by a $10,000 grant from ExxonMobil. The Phoenix teenagers had scraped together less than $1,000 and built their robot out of scavenged parts. This was never a level competition—and yet, against all odds . . . they won!
But this is just the beginning for these four, whose story—which became a key inspiration to the DREAMers movement—will go on to include first-generation college graduations, deportation, bean-picking in Mexico, and service in Afghanistan.
Joshua Davis's Spare Parts is a story about overcoming insurmountable odds and four young men who proved they were among the most patriotic and talented Americans in this country—even as the country tried to kick them out.
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